Jump to content
Edwardkenway

What kit to get

Recommended Posts

Hi I'm new to model building in wood though I have modelled plastic kits  and was wondering which kit to go for (I would prefer a naval brig or cutter )

I would be grateful for any input 

Thanks 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gidday Edward and a warm welcome from the Land Downunder.

You pose a very interesting question and the answer is anything but straightforward.

Many considerations including, scale, type or class, budget and ability need to be considered.

I would suggest a search of the various build logs to assist in your model selection.

One major consideration is obviously your preference in model as you may receive a lot of recommendations.

Obviously these are just some of my personal thoughts and I sincerely hope I haven't confused the issue.

Wishing you all the best in your search.

Mark.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd suggest that for your first you look at something like the Endeavour's Long Boat. It'll give you a basic lesson in planking, rigging, mast tapering and a chance at mucking up without costing you a fortune. There are a number of builds here including mine below my signature. Get that under your belt then go for a cutter before attempting a multi-mast build would be my recommendation.

 

Rick 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the thoughts on my question. Although I have not built a wood boat I do have some experience of  modelling from scratch, mainly scenery for wargaming you know buildings, rivers, trees etc...  I have been reading some of the build logs on here and have been drawn to HM Cutter Sherbourne as she seems to fit my brief and will give me some experience with rigging a mast and yards. 

So thanks to all on here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good Morning Edward

Welcome to MSW and ship modelling.

A lot of first time builders run into trouble with the hull planking.

Certainly a major skill to master. I have seen but didn't take a lot

of notice, some kits come with pre-spiled planks, and off the top

of my head i don't think they were necessarily big ships.

Have a look through the kit logs and the model site adds on the side bar.

And most importantly when building, take it easy and enjoy

Hooroo Chris

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another thing to consider is what ever you choose it has to hold your interest (wouldn't want something that you get bored with).  The HM CUTTER SHERBOURNE (CALDERCRAFT 1:64) wouldn't be a bad choice. It has a reasonable scale, not terribly expensive, has all the elements you are looking for. For me a better choice for a 1st build would be something like a AL 1805 Pilot Boat. One can be had for less than $75.00. And if you screw it up your not out a lot of money but you will have learned a lot. Heck, you may find out model ship building isn't for you.

If you ask a dozen people, you'll get a dozen different opinions. Do what makes you happy.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would suggest reading the articles here as a starter: http://modelshipworldforum.com/ship-model-plans-and-research.php  It might give you an idea of what to look for in a kit.   The common advice is start small, maybe no masts or a single mast and work up from there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, RussR said:

Another thing to consider is what ever you choose it has to hold your interest (wouldn't want something that you get bored with).  The HM CUTTER SHERBOURNE (CALDERCRAFT 1:64) wouldn't be a bad choice. It has a reasonable scale, not terribly expensive, has all the elements you are looking for. For me a better choice for a 1st build would be something like a AL 1805 Pilot Boat. One can be had for less than $75.00. And if you screw it up your not out a lot of money but you will have learned a lot. Heck, you may find out model ship building isn't for you.

If you ask a dozen people, you'll get a dozen different opinions. Do what makes you happy.

  

I would advise against the AL pilot boat. It might have been a decent kit in the past but i recently bought the "renewed" version and was quite dissapointed. The wood is rather cheap, it has too few bulkheads and only a single layer of planks (which requires filling which isn't exactly beginner friendly) and the keel shaper was warped and too thin for it's size.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One of the kits I had the most fun with was the Batelina from MarisStella. This boat gives you the taste of almost all the elements of ship building besides masting and rigging at a scale (1:10) that is so easy to work with. You will get a taste of planking,, shaping, bending and carving, all essentials of ship building. At a cost of under $100 you are not going to break the bank. They have a link on the homepage. Also check out my build in my signature, I did add a few extras but then that's what the fun is all about.

 Finally look for a model with a larger scale,  !;48 or larger. It is much easier to learn on larger scales and it's not quite as frustrating.

Good luck and have fun!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, Edwardkenway said:

.... I have been reading some of the build logs on here and have been drawn to HM Cutter Sherbourne as she seems to fit my brief and will give me some experience with rigging a mast and yards. 

So thanks to all on here.

With that little ship in mind, you might also consider The Lady Nelson.. 

 

Several great build logs here also.

 

I don't believe you mentioned where you are,  but you will notice the link I provided for Lady Nelson is Cornwall Model Boats in the UK..

 

While their shipping rates to the US  may seem a bit high, the lower prices you will get for  some kits , Like Sherbourne, usually will come in at a lower total cost, than the same kit +shipping in the US.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My first bit of advice is to get yourself a copy of "Ship Modeling Simplified" by Frank Mastini. It's a great introduction to modeling and guides you through all the steps of building a ship in clear, easy-to-understand language. There is a chapter on choosing a first kit. One of the best bits of advice in there is to look for a kit that is double-planked - the first layer is the thickest and gives the model its strength, the second layer is paper thin, making it much easier to cover up any imperfections you might have encountered in the first layer.

If you are from the states, my second bit of advice is to get on the Model Expo mailing list. They are one of the top kit suppliers, have great customer service and their own line of quality ship kits. Their regular prices are competitive, but if you are on the mailing list you will see that they almost constantly run sales on all the manufacturers they carry, which can save you a nice bit of change. You can also go to the site and download the instruction booklets for several kits. This is only about 1/4 of the instruction you need, most of the direction comes from the drawn plans that come with the kits, but it will give you the start of an understanding of what you'll be doing.

You didn't say if you wanted a solid hull or plank-on-bulkhead kit.  The Model Shipways Sultana is an attractive, solid-hull kit that can be had for a reasonable price when on sale. It's a good starter kit. There is a great free tutorial (called a practicum) that can be downloaded here that shows how to turn what is a good kit into a really eye-catching model. You have to buy some extra wood, because it shows how to plank the solid-hull and build some items so they look better than the kit-supplied pieces. Even then, if you get it on sale it's a great bargain. The practicum is worth looking at even if you aren't considering the model, since Chuck Passaro is a master of the craft and you can learn a lot that can be applied to other models.

If the Sultana isn't your cup of tea, there are a variety of other Model Shipways kits that are good first builds. 

Whatever you choose, good luck and enjoy. This is a great site with lots of helpful folk, so don't be shy about asking for advice. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/26/2019 at 10:34 AM, Edwardkenway said:

Hi I'm new to model building in wood though I have modelled plastic kits  and was wondering which kit to go for (I would prefer a naval brig or cutter )

I would be grateful for any input 

Thanks 

With all this great advice, you are probably more confused than you were when you started. 

The HM CUTTER SHERBOURNE (CALDERCRAFT 1:64) would be a great choice. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

About us

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research

SSL Secured

Your security is important for us so this Website is SSL-Secured

NRG Mailing Address

Nautical Research Guild
237 South Lincoln Street
Westmont IL, 60559-1917

About the NRG

If you enjoy building ship models that are historically accurate as well as beautiful, then The Nautical Research Guild (NRG) is just right for you.

The Guild is a non-profit educational organization whose mission is to “Advance Ship Modeling Through Research”. We provide support to our members in their efforts to raise the quality of their model ships.

The Nautical Research Guild has published our world-renowned quarterly magazine, The Nautical Research Journal, since 1955. The pages of the Journal are full of articles by accomplished ship modelers who show you how they create those exquisite details on their models, and by maritime historians who show you the correct details to build. The Journal is available in both print and digital editions. Go to the NRG web site (www.thenrg.org) to download a complimentary digital copy of the Journal. The NRG also publishes plan sets, books and compilations of back issues of the Journal and the former Ships in Scale and Model Ship Builder magazines.

Our Emblem

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research
×
×
  • Create New...