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CDR_Ret

What is Keeping Me from My Ship Model

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Posted (edited)

This thread was made for me.

 

I have been working on reconstructing the plans for the Galilee since around 2000. My son calls this work the 30-year ship model.

 

However, since moving to Colorado Springs in 2017, there are other things that have demanded my time.

 

Refurbing my back yard:

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No. One Grand-daughter's Leaf Press:

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Outfitting a Young Knight with an Authentic Shield:

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Tearing Down and Rebuilding a Deck (almost finished):

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No. Three Grand-daughter's Paper Press:

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And most recently, No. Two Grand-daughter's Puffin:

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Besides all the honey-do items and planting new shrubs, who has any time for a ship model?

Edited by CDR_Ret

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Thanks, and these are in addition to homeschooling three of the G-kids in science and math, and holding down a Board position with our HOA. I actually looked for a local job when we first moved here. But now that I'm fully retired, who has time for a job?

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Great projects CDR, you cross the line between handyman and artist with ease!

Sounds just about right, life always getting in the way of boat building. I have accepted this as part of the hobby. It could be work, family, health, it is part of the magic and myth really, working against all odds to produce after many years a model boat that very few will appreciate and that probably will not last a lot more than the maker.

 

Keep Walking

Vaddoc

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Join the club!  I started my first and only build over three years ago.  We were living in a rental until we found a house down here.  Once we moved into the new house, the ship build started collecting dust.  I take it down from the shelf once in a while.  I've even left it on one of the workbenches.  It's there now.  But it still gets ignored.

 

I recently purchased a full size sailboat.  Even the house has fallen to second place.  And the model?  ... What model? 🙄

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7 hours ago, Julie Mo said:

I recently purchased a full size sailboat.  Even the house has fallen to second place.  And the model?  ... What model? 🙄

Heh. And how is that "hole in the water into which you throw money" working out for you?

 

I bought a 27-foot Catalina sloop when I was still in the Navy, stationed in Charleston, SC. This was shortly after Hurricane Hugo, and there was virtually no intact dock space available anywhere in the area, so I had to moor it out on a buoy. The Navy marina was about 20 miles from where I lived. Every time a thunderstorm kicked up, I was worried that the mooring line would part or some other disaster would befall the boat. I put it back on the market two months after I bought it. After a lifetime of dreaming of what it would be like to sail my own boat, I discovered that the little time I had to spend on it wasn't worth the worry and expense of maintaining it.

 

Hope you find yours more of a pleasure.

 

Terry

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I'll admit I'm a bit nervous, Terry.  We're leaving for the boatyard tonight, about a 3 hour drive.  It will take us a week or more to bring her back.  I've made trips more potentially dangerous than this but I'm still feeling butterflies in my stomach and I can't pinpoint the source.  It may be we have no history with the boat.  I don't know the ins and outs nor has the engine proven itself to me. 

 

If you don't hear from me again, look in Davy Jones' Locker. ;)

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Posted (edited)
14 hours ago, Julie Mo said:

... I've made trips more potentially dangerous than this but I'm still feeling butterflies in my stomach and I can't pinpoint the source.  It may be we have no history with the boat.  I don't know the ins and outs nor has the engine proven itself to me.... 

Julie, I know exactly where you are at. Hope your trip goes better than mine did...

 

Because of the lack of docks or moorings at the Naval Base in Charleston, we had to berth our Catalina Screamer (named after my G-G-Grandfather's packet ship) at a small marina on Stono Creek, well inland from the south shore of Charleston Harbor. I and my family, consisting of my non-boat-person wife and two children under the age of 10, took delivery of the boat at the Naval Base Marina. We had minimal gear, mainly life vests, a chart, and some snacks. I had decided to remove the main sail for cleaning, but kept the big Genoa jib rigged, but furled. After having the boat put in the water and gassed up on a Saturday morning, I checked out what equipment we could—engine, bilge pump, fathometer, etc. Plotted out our route to the Stono Creek berth on our chart and then away we went under engine only. Strange boat. Untrained crew. No cell phones (this was 1990)—just a low-powered bridge-to-bridge radio for comms. What could possibly go wrong?

 

Things seemed to be going well until we were off the Battery of Charleston. Then my daughter yelled up from the cabin that there was water sloshing on the floor and smoke was in the cabin. I jumped down and checked things out. After some panic I discovered that the engine's mild-steel exhaust pipe had broken at a rusted threaded joint. Both the exhaust cooling water and exhaust gases were dumping into the engine compartment which adjoined the cabin. The bilge pump was able to keep up with the influx of cooling water, but the cabin quickly was becoming uninhabitable.

 

I decided to kill the engine and try to continue making progress under the jib alone. Well, that required unfurling the sail that was equipped with a roller reefing rig, which I had no experience with. Finally got the jib set, but none of the rest of my crew knew what to do about steering the boat while I was forward dealing with the jib. We ended up doing several jibes right off the Battery (that's a jibe with the jib). Practically wrapped it around the forestay several times. I'm sure that grabbed anyone's attention who was watching us. On top of that, soundings got down to five feet, and I just knew we were going to go aground on the Battery, on top of all our other troubles. 

 

I finally got the boat under control and the wind was fair for Wappoo Creek. But once we got into the creek, the wind died. I had to use the engine again and just live with the toxic smoke in the cabin. To make a long story endless, we eventually made it to our temporary berthing, which included having to communicate with a drawbridge, which didn't go well.

 

After that experience, we-the-family were not very happy with our first boat outing.

 

Over the next few weeks, I repaired the broken exhaust pipe and moved the boat back to the Naval Base Marina once they had a mooring ready. I think we had one day on the boat as a family before we sold it, and that was under engine power only.

 

I still love the idea of sailing boats, I just don't like the idea of owning one anymore!

 

Best wishes.

Edited by CDR_Ret

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    Well, once again it's my elevator!  While it was just completed in late December, the door doesn't open.  The send and call buttons are functioning but there is no way to get the door open, so what's the point of that?  Luckily I found this out today while I was upstairs!  Had this happened while I was in the basement, I would have needed a bit of help getting me and my wheelchair back up the stairs.  (Especially since there are no "facilities" down there.)  Of course there is always 911, but that would be a very expensive trip upstairs!

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I think you may have had a good case against the elevator company if you would have needed rescuing from your own basement. I have no idea what the fire department charged to get me off of my stairs and out to the sidewalk where I could get onto the ambulance stretcher when I broke my ankle but I am almost certain it would have been about the same to get you and your chair upstairs! Their equipment should be more reliable than just a few months just for that reason!

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    Whoopy!  The elevator problem is fixed already!??  It took almost a week to get someone out here, so it's a good thing that I wasn't trapped in the basement or worse yet trapped inside the cab!  If you are stuck in the cab there is no way for you to get out of it unless someone else is around to insert a key into the outside of the cab frame.  THAT is my wife's worst nightmare, as she is claustrophobic, and is the reason that even though her knees make stairs difficult, she still hesitates to use the elevator!

    Luckily no parts needed to be ordered as it just needed an adjustment. :Whew:

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CDR,

 

Personally, although I love building ship models, doing things with and for the grandkids and great grandkids ranks far higher in my book!

 

Your comment about not having time for anything since you retired really hit home! After I retired I became involved with eleven boards, committees and councils, including being a Director for one 501(c)(3) and treasurer for three organizations. I have cut back to only six boards and committees and that freed up some time. But combined with family life, home maintenance and my favorite pastimes of hiking, backpacking and nature photography there is little time for modelling.

 

But that isn't a problem. I took 15 years to finish one wooden sailing model kit, 14 years to finish a CAD model of a cruiser, and I am now working on a kit that I started in the mid 1980s. Whenever I tire of all the other activities I have some ship modelling project waiting for a little more research and work.

 

I guess I am like the tortoise - maybe it is a good thing I am going so slow because I might be going in the wrong direction!

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On 5/3/2019 at 7:46 PM, CDR_Ret said:

I still love the idea of sailing boats, I just don't like the idea of owning one anymore!

Very happy your sea trial turned out well, it could have easily gone the other way, If you get the bug again do not take it out until you have gone thru all with a fine tooth comb and please take a boating course or have a friend that is an experienced sailor instruct you in the finer points of sailing. They can be a pleasure and fun for the family or a family disaster. 

 

Anyway time for modeling git r dun.

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16 hours ago, Altduck said:

Can you have a phone installed in the cab?

    Actually part of the building codes for elevators requires a land line phone to be installed in all elevators.  This is due to a tragic incident way back when residential elevators were just starting to be installed in private homes.  In this case it was in a mansion in Newport Rhode Island in the 1800's where an old man and his wife became trapped in their elevator while their staff were gone for the season.  When the staff finally returned they found them both dead in the elevator apparently from lack of food or water.   

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