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What can be done to prevent seeing unwanted stuff through windows?

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I am working on the hull of HMS Victory from a kit. Victory has many stern quarters windows. I plan making semi transparent windows with mica glazing. Behind these windows there will be internals which are better not to be seen. What is normally done by modellers to prevent seeing unwanted stuff through windows?

 

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This is a good and simple solution.
I also do this with my military modeling.

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I dont know what mica glazing is but you can buy self adhesive films to imitate sand blasted glass. This comes in various degrees of transparency. It allows the light to pass through but only shadows can be seen through or nothing at all. Maybe this will suit your purposes. 

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You can also use white glue to make windows.   Lay the frame flat on some wax paper, add white glue (you might need to spread it around a bit) and allow to dry.  When dry, it has the appearance of the "old" glass, not the newer stuff that is even and perfect.

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Might I suggest dark grey paint rather than stark black if you decide to go that route?

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3 hours ago, mtaylor said:

You can also use white glue to make windows.   Lay the frame flat on some wax paper, add white glue (you might need to spread it around a bit) and allow to dry.  When dry, it has the appearance of the "old" glass, not the newer stuff that is even and perfect.

Thanks mtaylor. This method is good if I have ready window frames. Issue is I do not have ready window frames. The frames will be build around mica sheet.

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21 minutes ago, druxey said:

Might I suggest dark grey paint rather than stark black if you decide to go that route?

Hi druxey. Thanks for reply. This is good suggestion. I may do this in conjunction with "muddying" the rear side of mica windows with something. One good friend suggested to have a polyurethane sprayed. Another way I think could be just spreading some PVA glue behind mica glazing, What do you think?

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I don't use anything between the mica or whatever 'glazing' material and the grey painted backing card.

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So you insert a grey painted backing cards behind windows? This is instead of painting all "behind glass" room with grey?

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Mica is a mineral, a so-called sheet-silicate. This structure allows to be be split into very thin layers. It comes in an opaque metallic-brown variety, called biotite, and a transparent variety, called muscovite. It is called muscovite after Moscow, where once is was used as window-glazing in the poorer houses. It does not crack easily under stress and can be even bent into some radius. It is also more heat-resistant than ordinary silicate glass. For these reasons it was used as glazing in ships, lanterns, and still is used in looking glasses in furnaces etc.

Until the early 19th century it was frequently used in ship windows.

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Just being silly.  

 

Thanks for for the resource!  A few years ago I tried to get some mica for a Mayflower build and I found a rock collectors source, but was not happy with what I received. I would go with Druxey’s suggestion or maybe a blueish black, but not straight black.

 

Kurt

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you can also use the glass stuff for plastic models/ or 

you can cutt out some sheet from copy paper, (transparange) its ruff on ome side and blanco on the other side 

if you use set the ruff side out you cant see inn .

this can be glued on from the inside .

there is some thing else also to use ...

the clue stutt the use on windows /bathroom windows to prevents everione to see inn when you take a bath... can also bee used😊

 

svein-erik

 

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I think a painted barrier slightly apart from what ever you glaze the windows with give a more natural depth to the appearance, than applying something directly on the “glass”. You’ll just have to experiment until you get the look you’re happy with.

 

Kurt

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I would try a piece of craft paper - experiment with the color - or use a color magic marker to shade it.

The stuff we used in elementary school-  it is loosely pressed, mat, and flexible,  Press it against the hull.

It gives depth to the quarter gallery.  For the stern windows, just a bit back.

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