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Elia

Crown Timberyard

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Shipwrights -

 

I'm looking to purchase some Castello boxwood masting stock to replace the basswood I had originally used on my schooner model.  This past March I looked into Crown Timberyard and found their website down for business.  I've just looked again and it appears they are still down.  Do any of you know if they are still viable?  I haven't been around here much so I don't know what the current news and scuttlebutt is.

 

Thanks,

 

Elia

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Unfortunately, Crown Timberyard has become an unreliable source for high-quality milled hardwoods.

 

I recommend going to Syren Ship Models for boxwood; there are other sources but this one has inventory, reasonable prices, decent quality and is owned and operated by someone who is running a real business and not just a weekend gig hobby.

 

Ron

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I tried to post this earlier, but i guess I didn't push the right button

 

Syren Ship Model Company Has milled boxwood..

 

Not sure if he will do custom milling..   The largest thickness he lists is 5/16"...

 

For masts, the yellow cedar might be a less expensive but very workable option..

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Thanks for the ideas gents.  I contacted Syren and they don't produce strip stock as long as I need - my schooner has lower masts requiring 24 inch lengths.  Long ago I had purchased Oneida and some various hardwood stock from the Lumberyard so I'll look into them also.  Their wood was pretty nice.  I didn't purchase much boxwood back then; I think it was swiss pear, maple, and beech.

 

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Posted (edited)

True. Syren's woods are restricted to only 15" lengths, which can be problematic. However, the restriction won't be a problem for 80% of builds. I've been spoiled in the (recent) past with Hobbymill's 24" lengths which I found ideal for my needs. My takeaway: Chuck's 15" boxwood is better than 24" unavailable boxwood. BTW: Syren will mill strips. Do check out Lumberyard as an alternative.

Ron

Edited by hollowneck
forgot sign-off

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Just wondering--what would a shipwright of old do if they couldn't get lumber long enough for a mast? I have read about different techniques that were used but I don't remember the exact terminology. I bet, with a bit of research, you could have some very realistic masts.

 

Good luck with your masts, Harley

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This is a very good opportunity for someone looking to make a few extra bucks.   I am a very reluctant seller of wood and lumber.   Basically I have decided to sell my stock inventory of wood that I use for MFG as a way to service my customers left in the lurch by unreliable wood sellers.  The pieces are shorter out of necessity because that is what I need for laser cutting.  On the bright side.....my Boxwood is 4 - 5" wide which is fantastic.  My Cedar is even wider.  I could just as easily order a few billets that are 24" long and keep them on the sidelines for when a mast order comes in....BUT

 

 

Once again guys,  I do NOT want to get into the lumber business.  It is very time consuming and would suck up too much of my time where I could be spending it making products and prototyping kits.

 

There are two other sources of Milled....Boxwood and Swiss Pear and Hollly in the USA .

 

Crown which as you know is hit or miss for reliability.

 

AND the Lumberyard which is a big MISS on quality and accuracy.

 

This leaves a large opportunity for someone to jump into the space and fill a much needed supply breakdown.  I cant/wont do it and would actually love to stop offering the two woods I do offer so I can concentrate on other things.  Maybe some of you should think about jumping in!!!  

 

I may however (to temporarily help fill the gap) in the short term start to offer other woods in my inventory, but as everything I buy right now is 14-15" long and 4-6" wide, that will be what I offer.  I may open up my sales to include cherry and some other woods soon if Crown doesnt open up again for a while.

 

In the meantime for milled sheets.....take a look at https://ocoochhardwoods.com/scroll-saw-lumber/

For woods other than Boxwood, Swiss Pear and holly.  Excellent quality and great service.   If this unreliable gap in supply continues, I recommend that you guys might think about investing in a small saw like the Byrnes saw and mill your own strips from sheets.   

 

When a I get a large order of 3 or 400 strips of boxwood , that translates to three to four hours of me standing in front of my Burnes Saw.  I really hate to take 1/3 of my work day cutting one order of strip wood.   So hopefully something has got to give soon.  But if you jump in....remember to also offer Alaskan Yellow Cedar.  I would be more than happy to help any of you who decide to take a chance and start milling for folks.  Just ask.  

 

 

Wishful thinking....

Chuck

 

 

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For box wood masts one could also build up a mast around a core just like was done in many contemporary shipyards, depending on the height of the mast. Large lengths of box wood, if not properly sprung, have a tendency to bow in one direction or another. I have some 24" lengths of 1/4" boxwood that are as straight today as they were the day they were milled by HobbyMill. I believe he taught Jason this technique but he has had difficulties maintaining a full time lumber mill. As Chuck notes it is very time consuming and I suspect Chuck is constrained in charging what he really needs to due to the economics of the hobby.

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On these schooners - from what I've seen and read - the masts were made single, giant tree timbers.  It's quite possible some were built up as on clipper ships.

 

Elia

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What are your thoughts on purchasing a board of Costello and cutting sticks from it?  I have Byrnes saw (a gem), and while I don't (yet) have a full size tablesaw I have a number of friends who do.  While a board may cost ~$100 I could cut all I need and much more from that single board.

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Hi Elia - I have been milling my own wood for a while - few thoughts:

 

1) you will need a thickness sander as well.  you can't get the tolerances you need with a 10" table saw, and will need to sand out the saw marks.

2) consider a band saw.  when you cut billets  from a 2-3" block with the big saw, you have a big, scary blade raised pretty high above the table.  even with push sticks, it feels pretty dangerous.  I've been much happier since switching to a 14" band saw with resaw blade, where I have a lot more control and can keep my hands much further from the blade

3) you will have a lot of waste, particularly cutting stock for masts.  As you cut the strips from the billets, many will end up curved as the tension on the grain gets released.  Not a big deal when cutting planks, but a big problem for masts and spars.

4) won't be cost saving even with the prices of precut wood given the cost of the equipment, unless you are building more models than I will have time for in my life.  But it is fun, you never have to wait when you need wood, and you aren't limited to the sizes that are commercially available.

 

Dave

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Hi Dave,

 

I've been on the fence about purchasing a hybrid saw for some time, with its focus on home renovation projects.  I've made a cabinet with a friend who has a serious home woodworking shop and have a healthy respect for the tablesaw.  Now you've given me pause to consider it vs the bandsaw.

 

Those are good points.  I had wondered about sticks cut from a larger board warping and you've confirmed that that can occur.  I like the idea of not having to wait for an order - cutting what one needs as the need arises.  I don't have a thickness sander but am pretty close to ordering a Byrnes model soon.

 

My current schooner won't require much wood for the masting, though whatever my next build is will likely be a POF and boxwood is likely my wood species if choice.

 

 Thanks

 

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I started with the table saw because it is much more useful for other things around the house.    I use the table saw all the time for other projects, but only use the band saw (so far) for slicing billets for my models.  If I was only buying one tool, it would be the table saw, unless this is really the only thing you will be doing.

 

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Ahoy Mates

 

Do you wait to buy wood as you need it in your current build? It's not like in years past when you had hobby shops in your area where you could go to every day and buy just what you needed that day without worries about supply.  Like building balsa planes. I am 66 now and look back when I was a kid and how easy it was to find what I needed .

Now even with online shopping,next day shipping and the rest. Things have changed to in fact it's just the opposite. Even with all the instant buying and shipping,you now more than ever have to look ahead and plan ahead as to what you will need for your current and next builds.

Reason-Limited suppliers,with limited product . And producers going out of business due to either age or other demands since most are one or two person shops.

 

So we as builders now have to be pro-active in planning ahead for our own projects in materials we all know can be in short or no supply now or in the near future. Like our most used material-WOOD like boxwood,swiss pear and others.

 

Be a HOARDER with a real goal ,the wood you WILL NEED for your NEXT Builds. The same with fittings and other single  or limited source materials.

I am waiting for my last Order from Jason from Crown Timberyard now,and know he's doing his best to get current with the Orders he has now. And will be very happy with the wood I have Ordered. And it's not for a current build,but for my stash,I was getting low on my in house wood supply,and I have at least 15 kits waiting on shelves waiting to be built.

Look ahead,because that's the future and be HAPPY since you build wooden ship models!

 

Keith

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Ahoy Mates

 

 

Just received my Order of boxwood from Crown Timberyard yesterday from Jason. Great wood from a great supplier who has been under great demands for his limited time each day. It was well worth the delay in getting my wood for my stockpile for future builds. From 5/16" sq. to 1/32" sq. stock. I had just made my Order before he suspended taking Orders. I look forward to adding to my stockpile when Jason accepts Orders again. Thanks again Jason.

 

Keith

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