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TomJonas

CA-glue for ratlines?

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I am building Di Agostini's Vasa. For the ratlines they suggest that CA-glue should be used instead of the usual knots.

And paint it black to cover the glueblobs.

 

What do you think?

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Posted (edited)

No, never use cyano for rigging. use watered down PVA wood glue and brush it onto the knots. Wait to cure and then trim the excess. Also, use clove hitch knots for the ratlines.

 

But do not use super glue!

Ratlines.jpg

Edited by chris watton

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Excellent advice from Chris, Never use CA on rigging anywhere except to treat the end of your rigging to stiffen it when you thread it through a block or other small hole.  I built kits years ago using CA and it has since crumbled or destroyed many of the knots where I employed it.  In those past years, it was recommended by many but it hadn't been time tested.  Diluted PVA glue is perfect for the job and the clove hitches are very easy to do.

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Since carpenter's PVA is vinegar range acidic - bookbinder's neutral pH PVA may be a more prudent choice..

 

And an armchair experiment to consider:

Sew the ratline thru the shrouds.

Overlay the join locations with a clove hitch using a rope with a diameter that is a step lower than the actual ratline.

I suspect that the knot when using a actual ratline looks larger than it would on an actual ship.  It may even be a quicker way and less to finagle.

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Posted (edited)

This was an excellent advice from chris watton on how to do ratlines. As type of glue goes I suggest - never use Cyanoacrylate adhesive in scaled ship building for anything . Period.

Edited by Y.T.

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Thankyou! I'll skip the CA-glue. The knots are no problems, but sometimes the line between the knots is slacking and not tight. But that is only inexperience - have to be more careful.

 

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As an alternative point of view, I use CA all the time, even sometimes on rigging. I agree though that white or PV glues are best for rigging, I’m not in agreement that CA has no place in ship models. It’s a question of where and how you employ it. It’s also a question of scale too, smaller models have tiny shrouds and I’ve done ratlines entirely in CA on my smaller models, such as my Sophie and Leopard.

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YT-  

  I agree totally with your statement "never use Cyanoacrylate adhesive in scaled ship building for anything . Period. "   CUDOS!!!!

Allan

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Posted (edited)

I would also like to add that you only apply the diluted PVA glue to the ends of the ratlines, where you trim off the excess, there is no need to add it to every knot. You can then carefully pull/manipulate the ratlines to that the shrouds do not appear to be pulled in.

 

I have always used PVA (except for applying CA to the ends of rigging to stiffen it to help get it through deadeyes/blocks/eyebolts) because the models needed to travel a long way, and the chance of mast and spar damage was high. If every part was stuck with CA, the damage would be much worse. As it was, it was only the rigging lines that worked loose on occasion, leaving the masts and spars intact - which would be much more difficult to replace/repair.

Edited by chris watton

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I am in the minority. I have been using CA on rigging lines for decades and have never had a problem. PVA may be a better choice based on those who have tried both, which I have not. I use a very small amount so as not to change the color of the line.  

 

Scott

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I never use CA or PVA on rigging above all for one simple reason: things cannot be undone, if needed. I always use a fast-drying solvent-based varnish. A drop of solvent allows you to loosen knots and adjust the lines, if needed - and often it is needed.

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Would totally agree that CA is mostly a no go in rigging. However, I used it once on knots when giving a final fixation with 0.25 mm black rigging lines. The knots were then covered with black ink. Applying the CA was a bit tricky. I made the experience that watered PVA also leads to changes in the colour of rigging lines (depending on the type of lines).

Clark

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The darkening of light coloured threads is the same physical phenomenon as for wood: the pores filled with glue act as a sort of optical fibre, leading the light deeper into the material, with less light reflected from the surface and the inside of the pores. This is more or less unavoidable for deeply penetrating glues or varnishes.

 

Low-viscosity varnishes applied sparingly do not fill the pores and, hence, lead to less darkening.

 

I am using cellulose-nitrate based lacquer (Zaponlack in German), which is traditionally used to protect shiny brass and silver from oxidation. It is colourless and can be redissolved or made to penetrate more with a drop of acetone.

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