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On 6/28/2020 at 8:43 AM, John Allen said:

Rob S,

 

Don't worry about the bumps in the planking tiles even though there extremely thin they will take a lot of sanding, also you will probably have half the bag left over so don't be chincy if you break one or sand too much you will have plenty left.

 

Also late to your log always read ahead with Mamoli instructions you'll find on page 6 you should have added to page 2 (example). 

 

Looks Good

 

John Allen

Thanks for the advice John, very good to know. It did seem like there were a lot of them. Also I’ll be sure to spend more time looking ahead at the instructions. 

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This exercise is a mini planking task.  I’ve worked the tiles up from the midship section to the keel area on the starboard side.  You can see the tile curvature stretching to bow (top of picture) and stern (bottom of picture) areas.  I’ll be in a better position to adjust the tiles in these areas based on the number of rows required to cover the smaller spaces at each end.  So there are more tiles required to cover the midship area then at the ship ends.

 

Just call me ‘Captain Obvious’.  

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Progress as of today.  Still have some gaps to fill in for the starboard bow section.  The stern piece will follow after the port side bow area is complete. then the port side stern. Then the keel area/band.  Fortunately these small green tiles are easy to modify.  

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I apologize for an uninformed question, but can you explain the green copper tiles? I’ve seen copper plates and tape but this is the first time I’ve seen the green tiles. Are they part of the finish? Or do you eventually cover them? Nice work so far! I bet you’ll have quite a sense of satisfaction once these tiles are all done.

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9 minutes ago, VTHokiEE said:

I apologize for an uninformed question, but can you explain the green copper tiles? I’ve seen copper plates and tape but this is the first time I’ve seen the green tiles. Are they part of the finish? Or do you eventually cover them? Nice work so far! I bet you’ll have quite a sense of satisfaction once these tiles are all done.

Not a problem. Mamoli provides these green tiles made of wood to imitate the copper tiles used on the actual ship. Mamoli states the ship scale negates the need to show the copper rivets. However, I’ve seen some copper plates that show the rivets fine.  The tile color is meant to replicate the tarnishing effect of the seawater on the copper. I’m currently undecided on whether to paint them copper or some other blend of copper/green/brown to show the effects of the seawater.  No need to cover them with anything but paint.  I decided to stay away from the copper tape.
 

Good question!

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Thanks Rob

I have been considering scale and since my build is 98:1 the pieces should approximate 48” x14” tiles on Victory. That equates to about 0.5”x .14” or  12.5 mm x    3.6 mm. Not to get crazy but this is small. Just thinking.

Again thanks for the details in words and pictures.

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I’ve received several comments on the green copper tiles or ‘plates’ as described in the Mamoli instructions.  While many of the craftsman in this forum have chosen to use substitute material (and I don’t blame them) for the copper plates used at/below the waterline, I’ve chosen to use the green wooden tiles/plates provided by Mamoli.  You can see they come in various sizes to be used as fillers in some cases.  Below is a picture of the tiles in their native form with some of the various shapes and sizes.  Once covering the hull at the waterline and below, they can simply be painted copper or perhaps a mix of copper/green to show the hull in more of a used condition (I.e., in need of dry dock).  

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I am anxious to see what the finished product looks like.  As I have mentioned in my log my 98:1 scale makes it difficult to be do the copper to scale. I am still up in the air about how to do this. I like authenticity as much as possible.

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Have completed the bow area. Continuing to fill in the ‘copper’ plates in the stern area and beginning the rudder. The plates will be modified to the rudder shape after the glue has sufficiently dried. 
 

Will add the walnut strip to the keel shortly.

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I've just shaped and attached the keel wooden strip after soaking it in warm water for 15 minutes and bending it with a heated plank bender.  The wood material was walnut, 5mm wide by 2mm in depth.  It was difficult to shape.  Any suggestions out there for shaping thicker planks?  I'm thinking I should have left it in the water at least another 15 minutes.   I've got the lower wales still to shape and want to minimize the chance of breaking/cracking the wood. 

 

Thanks in advance.

 

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You might try steaming Rob.  I have seen where builders use a steam iron but I have not done it myself. Then again soaking for a long time might work. Perhaps repetitions of soaking,heat bending,soaking,heat bending.

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There are several techniques to bend and form wood.

I would say just plain soaking is the most common. 

Not all of us can use the steam iron ( the spouses).

I have tried using a tea cottle, the type that releases steam from the tip, it works but it's not pleasant for the fingers.

Lately I have been using a heat gun (model version, small nossle), yes it still freaking warm and you can burn yourself if not careful.

One advantage with the latter is that the wood will remain its dry characteristics. 

When soaking, wood expands.

Second disadvantage, you can't glue it directly specially if using wood glue.

So you have to place the plank in location,  pin it down, let it dry to shape.

It's time consuming but it works.

When I planked the longboat I used the heat gun exclusively. 

 

There's an iron that is widely used in the RC airplane building,  that you can use, some iron have just one temperature,  others variable. 

https://www.rcplanet.com/tools/covering-tools/hangar-9-sealing-iron-han101/

 

Best of luck,and feel free to ask questions. 

That's why we have 37k+ members!

Someone will have an answer. 

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Thanks Emmet and Nirvana for your advice. As I begin transitioning to the second planking, I think I’ll start with soaking the pieces longer and apply other techniques if they become necessary. 

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Now have shaped and fitted the starboard lower wales.  I soaked in warm water the thicker wale planks (5mm x 2mm and 4mm x 2mm) for 45 minutes and tried a new bending technique that I’m sure most of you experienced wood workers already used. I’m just late to the party.  Instead of marking and starting where the plank begins to bend, I started the shaping process using my heated plank bender at the plank end and progressively worked back along the plank until I was able to fit the plank with my hands.  That worked really well.  Otherwise, the curve I obtained where the hull begins to curve in toward the bow was too large.   

 

I used the Mamoli supplied 1/90 scale drawing to place the wales using the aft and forward lower gun ports for reference.  Thanks to Spider999 for supplying some helpful reference pictures from his Mamoli Vic build.  

 

I’ve also noted some areas near the bow where the hull needs some additional filler.  Otherwise, there is a gap between the wales and the hull surface. Once they have dried to shape I’ll add the filler as necessary, sand and then fit/glue the wales in shape.  Then ‘rinse and repeat’ for the port side. 

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2 hours ago, Christopher Smith said:

By coincidence I am at roughly the same stage as your model, I did not use the green plates I cut up tanganika  veneer into 1/2 inch strips looks fine.

Hint inside the gun ports will be red paint them before planking around.

Thank you Christopher.  Understand about the red gun ports. However, I was thinking I’ll add the red paint last, rather than before the ochre or whichever color is required.  But I will consider your advice - e.g., pros/cons of which goes first.  The overall painting approach, especially timing, is a bit of a mystery right now. I’ll need to do some additional research.

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Had a bit more time available between yard work tasks today.  Shaped and am now drying the port side lower wales in place.  Plan to permanently place them tomorrow and then begin planking the area below them but above the waterline. 

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Hi Christopher! Welcome aboard. Glad you are here. The forum is a great place to share information and ideas that has loads of resources. Suggest you read some of the up front posts for forum guidelines. Your build looks nice!

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