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bruce d

'Cedar of Lebanon' wood, Cedrus libani

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Hello,

Does anyone have experience using a wood called ‘Cedar of Lebanon’?

Wiki says ‘Cedrus libani, commonly known as the cedar of Lebanon or Lebanon cedar, is a species of cedar native to the mountains of the Eastern Mediterranean basin.’

 

I have a small, well seasoned stash of this. It is very easy to work with and takes an edge beautifully, but all the information I have found refers to large applications like doors and wardrobes. I have nothing to tell me how it behaves in small projects where it might be bonded to another wood: for example, is it stable enough to be used in bread-and-butter hulls?

 

Any thoughts appreciated.

 

Bruce

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55 minutes ago, Bob Cleek said:

The Wood Database is  your friend.

Hello Bob,

Yes, it is a wonderful resource which I was introduced to by an earlier thread in the forum. This wood was considered a superior choice in the past for furniture and house trim and that is the source of my modest stash. I don't have enough to make a useful wardrobe (the ideal use for this aromatic wood) but more than enough for a ship's hull and base.

Besides the general question, because you never know what will pop up, the particular point I was curious about was how it acts when bonded to another wood. It has resins, as all cedars do, and strong aromatic properties. Both could cause 'issues'. Any problems?

Pretty sure I will use some but it seemed wise to tap into the collective (and vast) wisdom of this forum.

 

Bruce

 

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Question do begat answers which mean more questions.   :P 

 

Is the wood porous?  Fine grained?  If not porous (the "vein" holes) and fine grained then that's good.  So, take a couple of small pieces say 1-2" long by 1/4" wide and maybe 1/4" thick.  Glue them together with some wood glue and clamp.  Try popping them apart once the glue is dry.  As a side note, Yellow Ceder works very well for modeling.

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13 hours ago, mtaylor said:

As a side note, Yellow Ceder works very well for modeling.

While I expect it won't make any difference to the question at hand, i.e. how well cedar of Lebanon holds with glue, Alaska Yellow Cedar is actually a cypress, not a cedar.

 

(I know, ... picky, picky, picky.  :D 

 

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Will it scale well,  or does it neon flash its presence?

Does it scale well?

If it has closed pores and an indistinct variation between Spring and Summer rings?

 

If to your eye, a cut and fine sanded surface would show well on a model, it would be a waste to hide it as a carved hull - if it is difficult to source.  If if fails these tests, then carving a hull using it would work, if the Database is correct about its compatibility with wood glue.  It is in the  Lime, Spruce, Fir, White Pine,  Aspen  range of hardness.  It should carve easily.

 

 

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Neon and fireworks. Although some pieces in my stash have straight, milky white grain the rest is contrasting rings. It carves very well and has closed pores in the yellow parts tending to open pores in the whitest areas.

The most appealing feature of this wood, and the reason I am thinking about using it, is the carving. 

 

Bruce

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9 hours ago, Bob Cleek said:

While I expect it won't make any difference to the question at hand, i.e. how well cedar of Lebanon holds with glue, Alaska Yellow Cedar is actually a cypress, not a cedar.

 

(I know, ... picky, picky, picky.  :D

 

  Nope, not picky to me.  I didn't know that. And for that, I'll go do penance.... maybe clean my apartment.

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