Jump to content
norm1116

Portland by jbelwood and norm1116 - BlueJacket

Recommended Posts

As far as the ht of wheel boxes I would nt get to concerned.  the bluejacket model is not that accurate . to reality.  If you folks are realy into accuracy i suggest you buy the book titled Paddle Wheel Steamers and their Giant Engines by Bob Whittier.  This book is available on Amazon and gave me great insight into the things that are seen on this model.  For instance no one will see the space  above the paddle wheels because it is covered by the brass decorative piece.  However they will see the engine.  If you want to get crazy focus on that area It is beautiful.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very nice work John,

I enjoy catching up on your Portland, a beautiful build...

 

Nils

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, dan evans said:

As far as the ht of wheel boxes I would nt get to concerned.  the bluejacket model is not that accurate . to reality.  If you folks are realy into accuracy i suggest you buy the book titled Paddle Wheel Steamers and their Giant Engines by Bob Whittier.  This book is available on Amazon and gave me great insight into the things that are seen on this model.  For instance no one will see the space  above the paddle wheels because it is covered by the brass decorative piece.  However they will see the engine.  If you want to get crazy focus on that area It is beautiful.

Thanks, Dan, for the book suggestion.  I just ordered a copy from AbesBooks; about fifteen bucks... can't wait to get it!

 

Rob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have been away from my computer for the past week. Spent the week visiting my daughter and SIL

in their summer cottage in Digby, Nova Scotia. Photo was taken in November last year. All last week

the Bay of Fundy was extremely calm. Digby is advertised as the World's Scallop Capitol. Bought them

fresh off the boat.

 

1867427044_IMG_0003_opt(8).jpg.0961e74be5fc62244f186db47078265a.jpg

Thin line in my photo of their photo is due to failed pixel sensor. 

 

John Elwood

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
15 hours ago, jbelwood said:

Have been away from my computer for the past week. Spent the week visiting my daughter and SIL

in their summer cottage in Digby, Nova Scotia. Photo was taken in November last year. All last week

the Bay of Fundy was extremely calm. Digby is advertised as the World's Scallop Capitol. Bought them

fresh off the boat.

 

1867427044_IMG_0003_opt(8).jpg.0961e74be5fc62244f186db47078265a.jpg

 

John,  What a spectacularly beautiful place; it looks to me like a perfect movie set!  I have never been to Nova Scotia, and scenes such as this make me realize what I've missed; and makes me want to go.  A week there must have been wonderful.  Thanks for posting.

 

Rob

 

Edited by RFP

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Sponsons

 

My stepson and I got this far when he started his Portland back in 1996.  At the time, the plank on frame instructions did not seem to be the best way to conquer them.  I'd like to show what we did back then, then I'll show the 2019 model.

 

In 1996, we decided to make the sponsons out of solid balsa.  It actually worked out!

 

Having stored the kit for 23 years, one of the sponsons was dented.

IMG_0868.thumb.JPG.a2c9f79176b8b97377e8aca8bb417e1d.JPG

IMG_0869.thumb.JPG.cf600038f2f305fa77c41f52cf76a19e.JPG

Not bad!  We only got 2 completed.  That was the end of the 1996 build.  I considered doing it again on the 2019 kit using basswood this time.

IMG_0864.thumb.JPG.7064c0c9b80b438fa898a51796cc6cf3.JPG

I couldn't remember how we got the shape down so well the first time.  After some consideration, I abandoned this method.

 

I really liked John and Clarence's method described by John in his sponson post.  I got everything together successfully, but didn't feel I could hold it in place to glue it down.  Then I saw Dan's sponson build.  He used 3 frames as a support for a one piece sponson like John's.  I went one step further.  Probably overkill, but It kept my brain on the right track.

 

 

Using 2 sided tape, I taped the back of the plans to a 1/16th basswood sheet and cut out the sponson profiles.

IMG_0867.thumb.JPG.3b63adfb18780cca2e301c75874cb6db.JPG

 

The stern sponson profile for under the deck was too wide.  I trimmed it back so the clearance to the deck edge was the same as the plans.

I cut some spare profiles out of old file folders.

IMG_0866.thumb.JPG.77d68ff2b90210e06aec38a2dba139a7.JPG

IMG_0861.thumb.JPG.0790c277687c5378f3979a4765af83fb.JPG

 

The additional step I took was to cut out an additional deck and hull profile out of 1/16" basswood.  On the deck profile, I scribed back 3/32" to accommodate for the angle of the one piece sponson.  I also cut it off where it will meet the formed rounded tip of the sponson.

 

IMG_0871.thumb.JPG.e08a3dc0a6740bc79fd99c36f5b9ce1b.JPG

 

I glued that piece down.  It's just framing.

IMG_0873.thumb.JPG.286fae27790d97a60661af96025a6253.JPG

 

I cut out a hull profile and scribed it 5/32", 3/32 for the angle, and another 1/16" for the thickness of the other profile.  Again, I cut off the rounded end where I would place the tip of the sponson.

IMG_0872.thumb.JPG.079fca01a7c41f8e58869d6953b4888e.JPG

 

IMG_0874.thumb.JPG.33b0e64da0ea4b08e89c67fcadac837b.JPG

I installed 3 frame pieces.

IMG_0875.thumb.JPG.228c5f08fa7a060ed549bb5a401e82df.JPG

 

I shaped the rounded end from the basswood supplied with the kit and glued it in place.  John mentioned he cut a rabbet to slip under the one piece sponson.  It provides a lot of additional support and was easy to add.  Thanks John!

 

IMG_0876.thumb.JPG.bf335e3463fa4a225515925ee6225c95.JPG

IMG_0877.thumb.JPG.7046f5a470b1869dd8fa3ae7d479f912.JPG

 

I used John's method to determine the size of the sponson.  That worked perfectly.  I cut out those parts.  I soaked the thin end of the sponson so I could get it against the hull.  I CA'd the part into place.  The molds were probably overkill, but it really kept me on track.

IMG_0878.thumb.JPG.81f12f97dc7ab04250267d83b87c8c4e.JPG

Once it dried, I started using filler.

IMG_0880.thumb.JPG.8f2abe0ec9ac697852a93571565325fe.JPG

IMG_0881.thumb.JPG.73c17d6a2a8e6cf45a3597d38a05cdd1.JPG

I'll sand this out and add more filler as needed.  So I'm calling this "1 out of 4 done".  I'll add more photos as I move through the filling/sanding, and I'll add a few photos of the remaining 3 sponsons. 

 

I'm sure it's been done successfully, but the plank on frame method does not appear to be the easiest way to go.  I'd like to thank John, Clarence, and Dan for getting me where I needed to be on sponsons!

 

Lots of filling and sanding to do, but here's the 2nd sponson. 

IMG_0882.thumb.JPG.3cfe59273e230280190eae3413bbbf42.JPG

IMG_0982.thumb.JPG.b239f3026e986bd4fa5d551a73eb2de0.JPG

I started one of the forward sponsons today.  I had made measurements per John's instructions, and cut out 2 sponsons a few weeks back.  Both looked good, but I still wanted a bit more support behind them.  I went a different way with this one.  I glued 1/16" strips on the back of the sponson.

IMG_0983.thumb.JPG.b3bdf1897fc4579744d56c55a565b6f1.JPG

I sanded the edges so the entire thing would sit in place correctly.

IMG_0986.thumb.JPG.b65f72a8a08b918b99a309d91894ec74.JPG

I CA'd the first 3 inches, and continued until it was in place.  I worked on the bull nose piece.

IMG_0987.thumb.JPG.da19bca1a72ffba572d8224c6375396d.JPG

I have plenty of filling and filing to do, but I'll do that after completing the 4th sponson.

 

IMG_0988.thumb.JPG.786458ea92d36dd64ca6fe951ca90486.JPG

 

Monday 08/12 I installed the 4th sponson.  I will post additional photos after the filling/filing/sanding ritual that is next.

 

Edited by norm1116

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/19/2019 at 11:29 AM, dan evans said:

As far as the ht of wheel boxes I would nt get to concerned.  the bluejacket model is not that accurate . to reality.  If you folks are realy into accuracy i suggest you buy the book titled Paddle Wheel Steamers and their Giant Engines by Bob Whittier.  This book is available on Amazon and gave me great insight into the things that are seen on this model.  For instance no one will see the space  above the paddle wheels because it is covered by the brass decorative piece.  However they will see the engine.  If you want to get crazy focus on that area It is beautiful.

 

I am really grateful, Dan, for the book suggestion.  I found an excellent copy at Abe's Books and have finished it... fascinating!  These huge old engines were, well, huge!  And, considering the technology and manufacturing capabilities of the time, were an amazing accomplishment.  I also found a couple of interesting YouTube videos of walking beam engines. lots of hardware, there.

 

Thanks again, Dan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Here's a kit model for anyone that likes walking beam steam engines - it is 41" tall and over 175 pounds!  It could be one heck of a build log!

 

https://downrivertools.com/marine-beam-engine-castings-and-drawings-set.html

 

It interests me that the walking beam in the kit photo is red.  I noted that Dan painted his red, and the 1996 kit has a brass walking beam with red tinting - see the brass photos in the 1996 kit section.

 

After reading RFP's post, I went on youtube.  If I read it right, there is a video of a working walking beam engine that is being used in an RC paddle wheeler.  There is also a video of a walking beam model at the Naval Academy.  I'm an hour away from there and will go and get some photos of it.  I'm not going to go crazy, but I'd like to represent the engine as best as my skill allows.  I may reconsider using the red tinted walking beam from the 1996 kit.

 

Here's the link for the walking beam engine the builder is using in a RC paddle boat:

 

RC paddle boat

 

 

 

Edited by norm1116

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My current project brings me back to my first love of model railroading. The below image shows an HO scale steel trestle

and scenery that I built for a client some 15 years ago. I am currently building the same trestle kit (Micro Scale Models) but

in a longer (270') and higher (87') version for a close friend. Scenery to be added is yet another story. Quite a departure from

the Portland, I'd say.

264206685_IMG_0005_opt(3).jpg.e251575aee509deb7f04cedde768ba95.jpg

John Elwood

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

I went to Annapolis to visit the Naval Academy Museum.  They have quite a collection of models and other items.  Some of the models are as old as the original ships.  They have a model of a walking beam engine.  It is displayed in a position where it is difficult to get a shot of the back of it.  Also, it is attached to an electric motor and gear so you can see how it worked.  That part was out of commission, but there is a youtube video of it.

 

Here's a video of the walking beam engine I took.  If it doesn't work, message me.

 

Walking beam video

 

Here's a few pictures I took while I was there.

IMG_0903.thumb.JPG.42609f0d629792a9edf72387e173c6d6.JPG

IMG_0904.thumb.JPG.8e1b0ba7420c0b314c864da56cb76ca3.JPG

IMG_0905.thumb.JPG.652962865c1472b31320632965081c5b.JPG

IMG_0906.thumb.JPG.097db666a77be9c03a718cc2a6a32915.JPG

IMG_0907.thumb.JPG.fcb459228d8c6d01bcc889b373005c6a.JPG

 

IMG_0908.thumb.JPG.f07dbf78ab9d8668d7c084e6e979a227.JPG

IMG_0909.thumb.JPG.311963aab67fb3529669eb1ea97d8d7d.JPG

IMG_0910.thumb.JPG.dbd9bf011134e3a3f3f5454825205209.JPG

IMG_0911.thumb.JPG.3ed011a58e4cfda95684831276e42636.JPG

IMG_0912.thumb.JPG.62f6af33ff7f7d0418d5cd4c56627eb9.JPG

IMG_0913.thumb.JPG.acf0822146fa480b98f18dc08eb28a58.JPG

IMG_0914.thumb.JPG.6b178c3bddc50e46aed07964a2fe8e4a.JPG

IMG_0916.thumb.JPG.e93cd8d87510be63c2f8bf1e12df2fcf.JPG

IMG_0917.thumb.JPG.019dc6b1f41f8f3f8bd08fce08bff830.JPG

IMG_0918.thumb.JPG.1673ddfadf34e71a83d30f018b0a074e.JPG

IMG_0920.thumb.JPG.4910800e8acc4b645622b4df2f65c5db.JPG

 

 

Edited by norm1116

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Other photos from the Annapolis Naval Academy Museum.  Some of these models were 5 feet long.  At least one is considered to be one of the oldest models in existence, built in 1650!  If you are in Maryland and get the opportunity, try to visit the museum.  I tried to keep the placard photos in line with the ship, but one or two may be out of order.

 

IMG_0884.thumb.JPG.101d22bbf37b1d6882635fc6c52e6ce2.JPG

IMG_0885.thumb.JPG.81285c8df77609af2fa52ff9183eab39.JPGIMG_0886.thumb.JPG.8b0648d7816b303f491566adcda60079.JPG

IMG_0887.thumb.JPG.71734eb62cd228c93d1418d545deba5a.JPG

IMG_0888.thumb.JPG.97003bc9c69ad7bd40a30ab7a4bff146.JPG

IMG_0889.thumb.JPG.4d95f43e4ed8668e690d22022facfb27.JPG

IMG_0890.thumb.JPG.7e4b5c90715fb0267c6e32de2518fd5c.JPG

IMG_0891.thumb.JPG.83c2dc36a4165b6daf002c4e0bb89c98.JPG

IMG_0892.thumb.JPG.f0a729932d87230d85e8136a3dd6a915.JPG

IMG_0893.thumb.JPG.ab52f36dc3d23979ac08b4e94e30e14b.JPG

IMG_0894.thumb.JPG.bef126620f9000c9549e493083330278.JPG

IMG_0895.thumb.JPG.9eeae64d599422a857833930d5d02629.JPG

IMG_0896.thumb.JPG.3c79e719ab03b176d9595e08332f9c10.JPG

IMG_0897.thumb.JPG.4cb77dc79e54b80c3c34779ed8a73d36.JPG

IMG_0898.thumb.JPG.4baf9064afa73019a07fdeaefaf69625.JPG

IMG_0899.thumb.JPG.c8b608bcfb45daa8c9e177c64fe6e83e.JPG

IMG_0900.thumb.JPG.1d26eb54e3db78d423f442596779fcfb.JPG

IMG_0901.thumb.JPG.5dedf9c2c3d0372924d867571c344661.JPG

IMG_0902.thumb.JPG.3baa50b768363a9aa16cbc2d1aec7fd2.JPG

IMG_0915.thumb.JPG.5600f84fb60a383505c617c7d5ab5b87.JPG

IMG_0921.thumb.JPG.48609a9a571fb4e9f21482a0b734d2ca.JPG

IMG_0922.thumb.JPG.d289df86a54d7f761cd00afcceff7978.JPG

IMG_0923.thumb.JPG.2377436d086997fc326f0ddaac57a475.JPG

IMG_0924.thumb.JPG.59169ba35cf76685ee09e5327801ccd9.JPG

IMG_0925.thumb.JPG.a18b4b9cd580e1acce7c36211dbbd8d8.JPG

IMG_0926.thumb.JPG.6d1b034bf374209527fd30682920c0ac.JPG

IMG_0927.thumb.JPG.14f9e79bbf7d4c4cf0989dd106c1f647.JPG

IMG_0928.thumb.JPG.84e47847f9356f4a9eff67235019483f.JPG

IMG_0929.thumb.JPG.d25685eae3fde4b01b19b21cb581e827.JPG

IMG_0930.thumb.JPG.4c5929e77751c8e48825acb9774b0d87.JPG

IMG_0931.thumb.JPG.eb67b4b8f5f9a29d6e716f0f3c839cd0.JPG

IMG_0932.thumb.JPG.67932b93cb62a263829b8e900b06778d.JPG

IMG_0933.thumb.JPG.0224a7fa1f539863e36e384f39d55859.JPG

IMG_0934.thumb.JPG.2a81624c72e67956c2fab93b028eec7f.JPG

IMG_0935.thumb.JPG.e0445c2f137b20e60e9bb8fd93db6bf9.JPG

IMG_0936.thumb.JPG.644d11bc2a878e8542675682defd8ca2.JPG

IMG_0937.thumb.JPG.5607f8ff8212e09975e3cb564057cf47.JPG

IMG_0938.thumb.JPG.22686e06ba3b67f92329b58ba37ae0c9.JPG

IMG_0939.thumb.JPG.348e0a373872feba5e63b2ded10c9614.JPG

IMG_0940.thumb.JPG.deceb52e2e64302f24b0afcace87c83a.JPG

IMG_0941.thumb.JPG.0781b00a7f21758a79a7eab47898019f.JPG

IMG_0942.thumb.JPG.e1ddd5bb4c4b657257ebbd5847882c31.JPG

IMG_0943.thumb.JPG.882bfccc3a9459ba4938fa3202b0429c.JPG

IMG_0944.thumb.JPG.cc918754fc5f7108343ab321c9ae5e85.JPG

IMG_0945.thumb.JPG.18f9bfaf43da5628621b257a4faeec93.JPG

IMG_0946.thumb.JPG.6bafaca8c2e0073f95053bcd33b7e0a1.JPG

IMG_0947.thumb.JPG.56908ccb6b8806d437bd8a1cc61fbd00.JPG

IMG_0948.thumb.JPG.2c05e94088c24e3557586847d95fbc91.JPG

IMG_0949.thumb.JPG.62f531e2a57b8c0641b619f77c3eaa40.JPG

IMG_0950.thumb.JPG.a9058564712a2a98c670e46a8c76604d.JPG

IMG_0951.thumb.JPG.16c4c0d17c7b688176c0e43082bae464.JPG

IMG_0952.thumb.JPG.d6bd24a24e3e76249410c426586584e9.JPG

IMG_0953.thumb.JPG.2b12c957e5341ce54d4f3ba93a8a7728.JPG

IMG_0954.thumb.JPG.572c358bff53b18ff5911af3850f8c5f.JPG

IMG_0955.thumb.JPG.a46589f7d12204b3daf5ebeaae38f7d3.JPG

IMG_0956.thumb.JPG.73946f4dd086a3a2fcd6203bf701c6e9.JPG

IMG_0957.thumb.JPG.6f2a0c13e580d8d7d49d1c4e03586c95.JPG

IMG_0958.thumb.JPG.aaf26affd397571976746424df5829ab.JPG

IMG_0959.thumb.JPG.4afe9586adfb2a954a31214d4cbbe257.JPG

IMG_0960.thumb.JPG.c160f6c21375615dcffe7d13c9afb7ce.JPG

IMG_0961.thumb.JPG.2498d3709e3df0f08e8bdb3690193f20.JPG

IMG_0962.thumb.JPG.d83bbc4587a4f06769c0b8bcf6f47052.JPG

IMG_0963.thumb.JPG.2ceab25dbdfebe87f2081e306429a29a.JPG

IMG_0964.thumb.JPG.ce856f1f05f8fd93c972ab09c834c92c.JPG

IMG_0965.thumb.JPG.933f068b6313fed54272a555160cdc7a.JPG

IMG_0966.thumb.JPG.41e318d0e1f5123847233dc162e753d7.JPG

IMG_0967.thumb.JPG.46c3835e5449f6820873595aa1b49b59.JPG

 

IMG_0970.thumb.JPG.d2c9ee6c4cfa3828f7c0a8c71654c529.JPG

IMG_0973.thumb.JPG.99ca671f6baca6662494707573f5ce43.JPG

IMG_0974.thumb.JPG.05ae84cdbf33378e969312757a35e885.JPG

IMG_0975.thumb.JPG.4eb27db2cfc2c2cc6fbda2e99b2cc87c.JPG

IMG_0976.thumb.JPG.32c2e0ef1f5825e602b7c76b94b42871.JPG

IMG_0977.thumb.JPG.3caa9d156fa23876bd1a41fd17c86c7d.JPG

IMG_0978.thumb.JPG.59321b4d2f83cee60a62a957de158a16.JPG

IMG_0979.thumb.JPG.f45d0da28806b9121bdd754e7d723a91.JPG

IMG_0980.thumb.JPG.8933f3674964825d4ffd6398ac637233.JPG

 

 

IMG_0969.thumb.JPG.b93dddd8c70a91c52702c50231abe144.JPG

 

IMG_0971.JPG

IMG_0973.thumb.JPG.9be4386df3f0fa215740ae4e75072e5e.JPG

IMG_0974.thumb.JPG.22786e41dd0bd718cd52710c526d7595.JPG

IMG_0968.JPG

Edited by norm1116

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I took my granddaughter to see these models 5 years ago, age 7-8, she found it fascinating, even the  "mannequins". 

 

Great photos! Thanks for posting. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

very nice pics of the naval museum  those are some asmazing models.   The walking beam engine shows a lot of detail as far as the bolts and rivets.  Also i like the control levers.  great share.  The Poprtland is almost done should have pictures soon.

Dan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

John/Dan/other portland builders,

 

I have a question.  Reading the manual, it says that most of the walking beam engine is below the main deck.  According to the blueprints, we only need to build what shows ABOVE the main deck?  I'm figuring the final engine size to be 4.5 to 5 inches tall?  Does that sound right?

 

The instructions say to show as much detail as you can.  It would have been fun building more of it.

 

I'm painting my hull now.  More sanding, more filler.  I hope to have a new post in the next week or so.  Like I said, I'm also working part time too.

 

Any thoughts on the walking beam process?

Edited by norm1116

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hi Norm just got back from Lake Tahoe.  

As to the walking beam engine.  I think it is one of the most interesting aspects of the ship.   The opening looking down is rather narrow.  If you leave that way it will limit the veiw of the engine.

on my building I cut away some of that to allow the veiwer a clearer picutre of the engine and the room.   

I used a lot of wire and scrap peices from erector sets and old ships.    I also used evergreen plastci to form the crank  levers.   

the only thing i used from the kit was the brass walking beam which I thicken with plastci strip.

 

You can go as crazy as you like 

Good luck

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All,

 

Sorry things are going slowly!  I got a part time job stocking shelves at my local Walmart.  I could walk there if I had to.  I'm working 3 days a week 4 a.m. to 1 p.m.  After 21 years behind a desk and never exercising, this has been good getting me back into exercise, and I'm getting paid for it!  Of course, cleaning up 21 years of sedentary fatness is a bit painful. 

 

I painted the hull, so I will post those photos today.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Priming, Hull Paint, Waterline, Keel, Stem Post, Stern Post

 

I learned a lot about painting.  Actually I remembered most of it from the past, but it came rushing back while painting the hull.

 

I suck at painting.

 

Spray, brush, you name it, I am no good at it.  So here goes...

 

I felt that I did an OK job getting the hull ready to paint.  I figured after a coat of primer I'd notice a few spots to fix.  Let me tell you, painting the hull showed me how wrong I was.  My hull has many more imperfections than I would like to admit to.  I'm letting many of them go since they will not be visible on display, but they are there!

 

I did a couple of primer coats using a white spray primer.

IMG_0990.thumb.JPG.6ea2daba4a551b7a38f98871f2d97940.JPG

 

You may have noticed that I forgot a step.  I need to refer to that manual more often.  I should have installed the keel, stem post, and stern post first.  To get there, I needed to take care of my display needs.

 

I purchased the optional stanchions and display board.  Both are exceptional.  I knew the keel would need to be removed where the stanchions are located.  They recommend and send 3 stanchions for the Portland, but I want to try only 2.  My thought is I could set it up for 2 and add the third later if needed. 

 

I pulled out the display board and decided how I wanted the boat to sit on it.  I drilled holes for the stanchions. 

IMG_0992.thumb.JPG.1fb14ab4623785b1f876854b20779ff1.JPG

 

I used my string to find the center of the hull.  I set the boat on the stanchions where I wanted it to sit, lining up the center as close as possible.  I then pushed a screw up through the stanchion to mark where the hole would need to be drilled in the hull.  I drilled that 1 hole on the center line, and mounted it to the base.  I aligned the 2nd hole, and marked it with the tip of a screw through the stanchion.  I unscrewed the hull, adjusted the 2nd mark to the center line, and drilled the 2nd hole.

IMG_0991.thumb.JPG.5c7bace0e63e63eda3180e303fe81c09.JPG

 

I remounted it all to see the results.  Check out that display board.  It is really top notch.

IMG_0993.thumb.JPG.e918092b0c96337308c727ab5acfff22.JPG

 

I'm sorry I didn't take any photos bending the wood around the bow, but I followed the manual and here's what I ended up with.  Using the plans, I tried to have this part meet the keel where the thickness changes.  I don't remember the exact measurements, but the keel is the same thickness until it approaches the bow, where it thins out a bit.

IMG_0994.thumb.JPG.3af5fb9e95ea9b06c103c30e3e8b41fb.JPG

I knew the keel would need to be cut out for the stanchions, so I added the first piece.

IMG_0995.thumb.JPG.c5d6e523578db482e5891a76e23319d3.JPG

 

I added the keel between the 2 stanchion holes, and the keel post.

IMG_0997.thumb.JPG.d08f719b6e6fb47463cb385860366e5f.JPG

IMG_0998.thumb.JPG.4bb5b81c665fc65de1fb8664b8562268.JPG

Using a sanding block, I sanded this area so the keel smoothly rounded the bow.  I left the bow part thicker than the plans show.  I may need to resand it later, but I wanted a bit if insurance just in case.  You can see the final product below:

IMG_0999.thumb.JPG.562754c79e868263d9abeee127318015.JPG

IMG_1000.thumb.JPG.2c58094dd335ebdb291da99816ae228b.JPG

 

I used calipers to measure where the waterline is on both ends of the boat and marked the hull at those locations.

IMG_1001.thumb.JPG.b01cbbfeca9341e2ea9a4724515564a8.JPG

 

I needed a flat area to do this work, so I used the kitchen island.  I liked John's use of a large mirror, but if you saw me you would understand why there are no large mirrors at my house.

IMG_1002.thumb.JPG.83af693173160e8463188f0fd33e4b43.JPG

 

Using my highly professional Norm-O-Matic waterline marker, version 2.0, I lined my pencil to the mark on the bow.

IMG_1003.thumb.JPG.caefd0da60e519a8786f94c8a3b92fb7.JPG

 

The pencil did not align at the stern.

 

IMG_1004.thumb.JPG.73e28ef4fdbcb246222c319d3801302d.JPG

 

I added the necessary shim to raise the stern to the correct height.

IMG_1005.thumb.JPG.f87c879f1ac9bb4894d5b07b6357631b.JPG

 

That did it.

IMG_1006.thumb.JPG.fbbad85b84bf2e33b7ae70ffd042a36c.JPG

 

The next step was to make sure the port and starboard heights were the same.  I used the square and made necessary adjustments.  I went by the deck height.  It worked out alright.

IMG_1007.thumb.JPG.d190ffd3c98b583bdb67d3cf773c7b3d.JPG

IMG_1008.thumb.JPG.b3a8ff7918be7d2d19733e1f6eeccc41.JPG

IMG_1009.thumb.JPG.5cfc8b78d365c2c3a4bf3a92beb60e36.JPG

 

I drew the line around the hull.  Be careful around the sponsons.  It felt tricky.

IMG_1010.thumb.JPG.2f87af753601c276837e13de69aea26f.JPG

 

If I took a photo of both sides of the boat, the waterline looks "off" a bit.  But I think it's because of how I built the sponsons.  Not really noticeable, but it's there.

 

I think the first place I heard about Tamiya tape was on Dan's Portland page.  Then John mentioned it also.  So, I decided to buy some from Amazon.  Worth every penny!  I don't know how others do the waterline thing, but my thought was to use the tape to cover the line I drew, then mark the line again for cutting.  It turns out that the Tamiya tape is kind of see through!

 

IMG_1011.thumb.JPG.381d9bf628e7ec3b4b15c12fda2640de.JPG

IMG_1012.thumb.JPG.f1cc124c8879b8992242f2c40a7aefbc.JPG

 

So, using a fresh X-Acto blade, I carefully trimmed the tape at the marked waterline.

IMG_1014.thumb.JPG.9e5bb53a5d18f793ece098c1310b066a.JPG

 

I do not have a photo, but I added a 2nd layer of tape below the first so I wouldn't have any slip ups.  So here's the first coat of red, hand painted with the paint I got from BlueJacket.  Another plug for them.  It is really nice paint.

IMG_1016.thumb.JPG.87b82bb331d706c8b9114da2ae40ab60.JPG

 

A bit of sanding and a 2nd coat.

IMG_1072.thumb.JPG.682e792437ac9a5a708cede4099cc191.JPG

 

More sanding, a third coat, and remove the tape!  I have a touch up or two to take care of, but in display mode, I'm accepting my work as it appears.

IMG_1073.thumb.JPG.810805736f35aa211b7e85c8811ce496.JPG

Thanks as always! 

 

 

 

 

Edited by norm1116

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rudder -

 

I followed the directions for the rudder.  I did have to trim things more than I expected to get it to fit, but it looks fair.  I'm reading up to see what the next step is, plus I'm going to start the walking beam, so I hope to have more posts soon.

 

There is a steering arm that will be added to the rudder at a later date.  I'll put that here when I get to it.

 

IMG_1074.thumb.JPG.178d3f123d693ebb143317efca27eba5.JPG

 

IMG_1075.thumb.JPG.1842a067bc38fa640c617bdb4c9a2de1.JPG

 

IMG_1084.thumb.JPG.2308f15ffff52c8736bea3b1493dd8f9.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello!

 

Due to the holidays, we will need the dining room table back to normal, so my Portland is going into dry dock until January.  Wishing everyone a great holiday season!

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi there Norm,

 

Thanks for all those photos. I've heard many very positive comments about the museum from fellow modelers

who have visited there. From your many photos, I can see why.

 

I have yet to get back to the Portland. My overall health has slipped to a point where the passion to build has

diminished considerably. I did finish the trestle however.

 

861393639_IMG_0004_opt(6).jpg.6c49f0029c9260b84115066ecfbfdf3e.jpg

Although it doesn't show, there are 374 pieces in this model, all cut from sprues. I estimate 70+ hours of work. It is to

be installed on a friends Northern Pacific layout over Elwood Gulch. You couldn't pay me to build another one.

 

John Elwood

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

John,

 

Take care of yourself, and get well.  That trestle looks spectacular!

 

In a million years, I might be able to produce a model half as good as what you have produced.  Your train stuff is unbelievable.  I wish I had the skill you show in your work!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, norm1116 said:

Hello!

 

Due to the holidays, we will need the dining room table back to normal, so my Portland is going into dry dock until January.  Wishing everyone a great holiday season!

 

 

Truly looking forward to your next post!

 

Happy, happy holidays to you... stay healthy and happy.

 

Rob 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, jbelwood said:

Just thought I'd throw this photo in for something different. Perhaps the most

photographed scene on my layout. 

 

IMG_0007_opt.jpg.7f15b94f36e982882c6fbe7d9d7ac0fb.jpg

John Elwood

John, you're awesome!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wonderful craftsmanship.  I understand the kitchen table as your building area. We sold our house some years ago to down size to a Town Home.  We just did not need all the space of the then home, all the kids were gone and the up-keep was just too much for retirement.  So now I too use the kitchen table.  And yes, at times it all gets packed up and away until the end of the holidays as well.  Looking forward to more of this most excellent build.

Rick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

About us

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research

SSL Secured

Your security is important for us so this Website is SSL-Secured

NRG Mailing Address

Nautical Research Guild
237 South Lincoln Street
Westmont IL, 60559-1917

About the NRG

If you enjoy building ship models that are historically accurate as well as beautiful, then The Nautical Research Guild (NRG) is just right for you.

The Guild is a non-profit educational organization whose mission is to “Advance Ship Modeling Through Research”. We provide support to our members in their efforts to raise the quality of their model ships.

The Nautical Research Guild has published our world-renowned quarterly magazine, The Nautical Research Journal, since 1955. The pages of the Journal are full of articles by accomplished ship modelers who show you how they create those exquisite details on their models, and by maritime historians who show you the correct details to build. The Journal is available in both print and digital editions. Go to the NRG web site (www.thenrg.org) to download a complimentary digital copy of the Journal. The NRG also publishes plan sets, books and compilations of back issues of the Journal and the former Ships in Scale and Model Ship Builder magazines.

Our Emblem

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research
×
×
  • Create New...