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I  am starting the Endeavour's longboat to day, the only concern I have is the 2nd layer of planking calls for contact cement, I do not want to use anything toxic in small apt. can I use wood glue or is there anything  better? help Dick C

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I would not recommend contact cement for the job, even in a well-ventilated space! Any regular white or yellow wood glue will work. As these have water content, the planks will swell slightly across the grain, so make sure that each strake is well and truly dry before applying the next strake. If you don't wait, gaps will appear along the seams as the planks shrink slightly again.

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I am stunned that a kit mfg would suggest contact cement for anything.  The bond it makes has an expiration date - a relatively short one.  It is messy as well.  Even CA , which probably will reverse it bond over time - depending on the formulation, it looks like,  would be a better choice.  PVA or really old school= hide glue would be a much better choice.  The one complicating factor -  PVA and hide glue require clamping - up to the point where it crushes the wood, the stronger the clamping force, the stronger the bond.  That means that less space between the adjoining surfaces, the better the bond.

Clamping hull planking is very difficult.  I use hitch chocks, but that is not useful for POB and it pretty much requires trunnels to fill the pin holes, or nipping the pins and filling them.

 

If you are set on a contact cement type bond, experiment with this: 

coat both surfaces with PVA

let it dry  24-48 hrs

join the surfaces and apply heat - an iron or heat gun - just keep the temp and contact time of the heat below the burn the wood or denature it level.

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PVA (polyvinyl acetate) is fine, hide glue is a mess to work with as it comes in solid form and needs to be melted.  For wood, plain old aliphatic (yellow carpenters' glue) has worked the best for me.  Tite Bond or Elmers brands of aliphatic glue are found everywhere.   Aliphatic resin glue is chemically similar to PVA (white glue) but is modified to make it stronger.   It does not require clamps if the planks are spiled or at least prebent to shape.  30 to 60 seconds of finger pressure is all I ever need as long as they are not heavily edge set.

Allan

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Posted (edited)

I use PVA as an easy way to designate both white and yellow poly vinyl acrylamide wood glues as well as pH neutral bookbinders white.  The yellow has a more water resistant bond due to additives - which significantly lower the pH.  Titebond III  is very water resistant, but is light brown and is pH 2.5 which is close to dilute mineral acid range.  Because I live on the coast of mid east US, where the humidity can approach that of liquid water, I use Titebond II.  I have let my aversion to using anything synthetic or plastic to allow it.

I have used Franklin liquid hide glue for unimportant and temporary bonds - it seems to have an unfavorable rep.  I intend to play with Old Brown in the future.  I have never gone beyond arm chair musing with glue pot - flake hide glue,  but it has been shown to last for a couple of hundred years,  and can be repaired. 

Edited by Jaager

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Contact cement is a terrible choice. I have used contact cement for kitchen counter tops an once it touches the surface there is no adjustment. Titebond 3, clamps and patience is the way to go.

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Posted (edited)

For POF ships I use a combination of both CA and PVA to attach planks.  I first pre-bend the plank to closely match the shape needed using an electric plank bender.  I then put CA on the frames where the plank will touch, this will hold the plank in place rather than having to use clamps.  I also put wood glue (PVA) on the edge of the previous plank between the frames that will abut the new plank to provide a permanent bond between the planks.  The new plank is then put on and held in place with fingertips for about 20 seconds to allow the CA to cure. Then move on to the next plank, no waiting.  It is a lot easier to do than explain.

 

This limits the need for clamping and ensures a permanent bond between the planks.  If the CA should fail in the future it probably will not matter. 

 

Paul

Edited by bogeygolpher
Clarity

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I'll bet it's an AL kit...am I right?

My 1st plank on bulkhead ship model was an AL and it recommended the use of contact cement for the 2nd layer of planking which was a veneer. That was in the 1990's. Guess what? I built it that way and now almost 25 years later, all that planking is still in place. Nothing has come loose, so there you go. Maybe it was just dumb luck, and now that I've read all the negative view points on using contact cement would not do it again, but I really can't say it's all that grim an outlook.

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