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Hello,


I do not know the value of the English pound at the end of the eighteenth century but if, considering that it has not changed (453 g) since, I apply it to 64 pounds, I get 27873 g.
The French pound weighed 489 g, which applied to 57 pounds gives us 28992 g.
There is therefore a significant difference of 1119 g which makes me think that they may not be English caronades but perhaps Dutch or ...

 

 

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  • 4 months later...

Wow - just wow - I have been collecting Ancre books and Monographs over the past few years.  This is by far the finest.  The incredible amount of detail in photos and plans are off the chart.  Some of the previous Monographs require back up of the 74 Gun Series (which I own) as a reference.  This one is a stand alone - everything is in here to make an incredible model - one that obviously influenced the Super Frigates of the US.  I ordered it two weeks ago and it arrived today.  I can't recommend this one enough - its a must have for anyone's library who love French ships.  Bravo Gerard ! 

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  • 11 months later...
On 11/23/2019 at 5:24 PM, G. Delacroix said:

Hello,


I do not know the value of the English pound at the end of the eighteenth century but if, considering that it has not changed (453 g) since, I apply it to 64 pounds, I get 27873 g.
The French pound weighed 489 g, which applied to 57 pounds gives us 28992 g.
There is therefore a significant difference of 1119 g which makes me think that they may not be English caronades but perhaps Dutch or ...

 

 


More, the English 8" carronades (not shell guns) fired a 7.92/7.925" shot of 68lb nominal weight, or a 56 lb hollow shot (boulet creux in the French style).  (A 56lb shot could be referred, but I don't know how common this lighter shot was this early, it taking considerably more processes to accurately form a hollow shot).
The (later) shell guns fired only the hollow shot or one of several designs of shell/bombe/shrapnel, while the coastal guns fired both hollow and solid shot, but ranged further with the heavier ball.

The 64lb gun was a RML rather than a smoothbore either as a new construction or a conversion of an 8" shell gun, by reaming out and fitting a steel liner of 6.25" internal diameter into which the rifling was engraved. This bore is the same as the 32lb carronade, for a significantly higher sectional density.

 

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