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Monograph - The Saint-Philippe -1693
Jean-Claude LEMINEUR
Ancre

Catalogue # PHILA (for the English, 1:48 complete edition)
Available from Ancre from €225,00 (scale drawing size dependent) 

 

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The Saint Philippe was a First Rank ship of the line of the French Royal Navy, the second vessel in the two-ship Tonnant Class (her sister being the Tonnant). This ship was ordered in late 1692 to be built at Toulon Dockyard, and on 20 January 1693 she was allotted the name Saint Philippe, taking the name of a ship lost in the Action at La Hogue in June 1692. The designer and builder of both ships was François Coulomb, and they represented an enlargement of his design of 1691 for the Sceptre, with an extra pair of guns (and gun ports) added on each level. They were three-decker ships without forecastles. The Saint Philippe was launched on October 1693 and completed in December of the same year. She was initially armed with 90 guns, comprising twenty-eight 36-pounders on the lower deck, thirty 18-pounders on the middle deck, twenty-six 12-pounders on the upper deck, and six 6-pounders on the quarterdeck. The Saint Philippe was rebuilt at Toulon from February 1699 to 1700; she took part in the Battle of Vélez-Málaga on 24 August 1703. In July 1707 - during the siege of Toulon - she and her sister were undergoing a refit in the basin of Le Mourillon and avoided the scuttling order which affected most other French ships at Toulon; they were sailed to counter the British attack, and subsequently were used as floating batteries. The Saint Philippe was condemned at Toulon on 18 August 1714 and was subsequently taken to pieces.

 

 

The Monograph

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The Saint-Philippe – 1693 is the very latest monograph from Ancre, having only been released a few months ago. I’ve seen numerous Monographs over the years, being lucky enough to thumb through them and be astounded at the levels of detail within. For me, this is the very first time that I’ve actually owned one, with this being sent by Ancre for review here on Model Ship World. It’s been a few weeks since I received this, along with a couple of other titles that I’ll be publishing articles for here in the upcoming weeks. 

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Be in no doubt, this Monograph is heavy. The website itself tells you that it weighs around 4.5kg (almost 10lbs, for our imperial users), and it arrived by courier in a superbly packed and padded box, along with the other titles. Saint-Philippe itself is also has a clear film wrap that needs to be removed before we can explore further. Written by Jean-Claude Lemineur and translated by François Fougerat, this set is presented in a large presentation semi-slip case that opens out totally to reveal the contents within. The slip itself is jacketed like a conventional book, with a beautiful photograph of José Tuset’s completed model on the cover. 

 

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General statistics for this Monograph are:

 

BOOK MAKEUP

  • 220-page brochure containing the source, the history and reduced-scale plates with commentaries
  • 16 page full-color booklet showing details of admiralty-style rigged models
  • 45 large format plates showing the full description of the vessel. (The sails and The Saint-Philippe under sail 1/96)

 

Chapter 1 - Presentation of sources

  • 1.1 Data defining the general architecture and construction elements
  • 1.2 Elements of decoration
  • 1.3 Colors used in the days of the Saint-Philippe
  • 1.4 Discussion about the theme of the decoration
  • 1.5 Origins of vessels of the class of the Saint-Philippe
  • 1.6 State of the Navy after 1692.

 

Chapter II - Flag-carrying vessels

  • 2.1 Saint-Philippe, 1662 – 1692
  • 2.2 Royal Louis 1668 – 1697
  • 2.3 Soleil Royal 1669 – 1692.

 

Chapter III- The Coulombs, father and son and the Toulon naval constructions.

Chapter IV- Evolution of bronze guns casting.

Chapter V- Summary of the Saint-Philippe’s operational career.

Chapter VI- Description of the timber structure.

Construction of the vessel accompanied by 31 reduced scale plates.

Chapter VII- Drawings and commentaries of the plates.

Chapter VIII- Commentaries on photographs of models.

 

1/72 dimensions

Hull                   L: 86cm, W: 24cm, H: 32cm

Fully Rigged     L: 105cm, W: 42cm, H: 90cm  

 

1/48 dimensions

Hull                  L: 129cm, W: 36cm, H: 48cm

Fully Rigged     L: 158cm, W: 63cm, W: 135cm

 

1/36 dimensions

Hull                  L: 171cm, W: 48cm, H: 63cm

Fully Rigged     L: 210cm, W: 84cm, H: 180cm

 

45 plates

  • Pl.1 Schematic elevation of the vessel
  • Pl.2 Schematic plan
  • Pl.3 Body plan
  • Pl.4 Construction of the head
  • Pl.5 Construction of the stern-frame
  • Pl.6 to Pl.14 Profile of the frames.
  • Pl.15 Elevation of the timber framing
  • Pl.16 Longitudinal section without furniture
  • Pl.17 Longitudinal section including furniture
  • Pl.18 Cross-section of the stern at station frame VI aft
  • Pl.19 Cross-sections at station frames V aft to III aft
  • Pl.20 Cross-sections at frames II aft to the main middle mould
  • Pl.21 Cross-sections from the main middle mould to frame II forward
  • Pl.22 Cross-sections from frame III to V forward
  • Pl.23 Plan of the hold
  • Pl.24 Arrangements in the hold and orlop deck
  • Pl.25 Plan of the first deck timber structure
  • Pl.26 Plan of the first deck including furniture
  • Pl.27 Plan of the second deck timber structure
  • Pl.28 Plan of the second deck including furniture
  • Pl.29 Plan of the third deck timber structure
  • Pl.30 Plan of the third deck including furniture
  • Pl.31 Plan of the quarterdeck timber structure
  • Pl.32 Plan of the quarterdeck accommodations and poop deck timber structure
  • Pl.33 Elevation view of the planked hull
  • Pl.34 Elevation view of the decorated hull
  • Pl.35 Structure of the stern and quarter-galleries
  • Pl.36 Decoration of the stern and head
  • Pl.37 Furniture I - Anchors - artillery - galley
  • Pl.38 Furniture II - Rudder - capstan - bitts
  • Pl.39 Furniture III - hatches - longboat - boats
  • Pl.40 Decoration and furnishings of the accommodations
  • Pl.41 Mainmast spars
  • Pl.42 Foremast spars
  • Pl.43 Mizzenmast and bowsprit spars
  • Pl.44 Sails (1/96 scale)
  • Pl.45 The St-Philippe under sail (1/96 scale)

 

Translated by François Fougerat

 

Model under sail by José Tuset

Michel Magerotte's single shell model

 

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St-Philippe-_anglais-2.jpg

 

Book Images

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Plate Images (very small sample)

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Images from colour brochure, of completed model

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Conclusion
I’m still getting to grips with actually owning something as beautifully presented and comprehensive as this publication for the Saint-Philippe. It really is a masterpiece in its own right, and you’ll need some considerable shelf space to store it. The book is a beautifully printed perfect-boundpublication with high quality finish paper. As Ancre themselves say, “The rare nature of studies dedicated to Louis XIV’s navy, the prestige surrounding the vessel under study, the abundance of pictorial information and the rich nature of the numerous commentaries makes this monograph a matchless trove”,and that really can’t be doubted whatsoever. This is an epic release, and if you like the large, triple gun deck ships, then this should have a place on your shelf, even if it’s only to pour over the sheer wealth of detail that has been put together by its author. Working with the plans will be a delight as the drawings are all fine line, ensuring the correct size of parts when you measure up against them. They are also all very neatly folded, with no unnecessary creases. Having the colour booklet with a completed model will also not just give inspiration but gives you a rough idea of what you need to be aiming for, as well as such gorgeous details such as the interior curved staircases and their unusual format/layout. The book not only grounds you in the history surrounding the vessel and its origins and protagonists, but also into the construction of what must’ve been a most impressive ship, even for those days of ornamentation. Amazing to think that you can actually build a complete, miniature ship from this set, down to every smallest detail.

 

Now….I just need a house big enough to build this model!

 

The Saint-Philippe – 1693 is available in English, French and Italian languages, and plans are available in 1:72, 1:48, and 1:36 scales. The plans may also be purchased separately without the book, in 1:72 and 1:36 scales. Check out the options on the Ancre website.

 

My thanks to Didier Berti of Ancre, for sending this Monograph out for review here on Model Ship World. To purchase directly, click the link at the top of the article.

 

 

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Posted (edited)

Does anyone else do anything like this? Lol the wife has said i can have it, but only  if i can scccesfully build the cutty sark in 1/48

Edited by Kevin

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Kevin,

No matter how much jest is involved,  unless you have access to a mansion sized building, either realization is a bit overwhelming.

The Cutty Sark would be easier, but larger.  At 1:48 a masted model is for all intents 6 feet long and about that tall.  The Saint-Philippe is about 6 inches shorter.  I have lofted Philippe at 1:120 and played with the framing.  The hull is about the size of a brig: USS Porpoise at 1:60.  Having second thoughts about doing a miniature, I looked at redoing the timbers at 1:60 using Navy Board style framing.  I hit breaks real fast when it demonstrated that the mid ship floor timber is too large to be had from a 2 inch wide piece of stock.  And the mid ship floor is the straightest, least carnivorous floor.   A POF at 1:36 ----  a Baby Huey that needs lots and lots of lumber to frame.  Framing at 1:48 would put a serious hurt on a 50 bf lumber stock.

If you were just married when you started these two, you would possibly be paying for your kid's college when you finished.

 

The Saint-Philippe is a late 17th century first rate with magnificent excess in its decoration.  It could easily stand as a magnificent magnum opus for any modeler.

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21 minutes ago, Jaager said:

Kevin,

No matter how much jest is involved,  unless you have access to a mansion sized building, either realization is a bit overwhelming.

The Cutty Sark would be easier, but larger.  At 1:48 a masted model is for all intents 6 feet long and about that tall.  The Saint-Philippe is about 6 inches shorter.  I have lofted Philippe at 1:120 and played with the framing.  The hull is about the size of a brig: USS Porpoise at 1:60.  Having second thoughts about doing a miniature, I looked at redoing the timbers at 1:60 using Navy Board style framing.  I hit breaks real fast when it demonstrated that the mid ship floor timber is too large to be had from a 2 inch wide piece of stock.  And the mid ship floor is the straightest, least carnivorous floor.   A POF at 1:36 ----  a Baby Huey that needs lots and lots of lumber to frame.  Framing at 1:48 would put a serious hurt on a 50 bf lumber stock.

If you were just married when you started these two, you would possibly be paying for your kid's college when you finished.

 

The Saint-Philippe is a late 17th century first rate with magnificent excess in its decoration.  It could easily stand as a magnificent magnum opus for any modeler.

A fair summary.

 

You could pull it in at just over 4ft long if you were to build the hull as an Admiralty-style model with all framing on show. I think that's how I would do it, or I'd need a much bigger house. 

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Posted (edited)
Lieber James,
 
 
Vielen Dank für Ihren Artikel hier. Also, wenn Sie möchten, bin ich sehr bereit, die nächsten fragwürdigen und gut gezeigten Ausgaben hier für Sie und Ihre Leser hinzuzufügen. Aber es wird keine Verbindung zu irgendeinem Rigging geben, was mit einem Rumpfmodell zu tun hat, und es ist weder ein PoF noch ein PoB, es ist einfach ein unkomplizierter und unkomplizierter Umbau in die SAINT PHILIPPE basierend auf dem Heller-Rumpf aus den 1970er Jahren SOLEIL ROYALE.   

 

In der Broschüre befindet sich eine S-Linie, die falsch eingefügt ist. Es fehlt in den Plänen - hier der Auszug aus meinem Baubericht:

 

Ich komme also auf die S-Kurven-Frage zurück, die im Buch auf Seite 154 behandelt wird. Diese S-Heilung wurde versehentlich in das Buch aufgenommen. Hier die Email von ancre.fr:

 

Christians E-Mail über die Tafel Nummer 36 von St-Philippe.
Ich konnte verstehen, dass die Frage die Linie in Form eines Doucins, der "S-Linie", betrifft, die die Füllung zwischen dem Vorurteil unmittelbar hinter dem 1. Anschluss der 1. Batterie, sichtbar am Bug des St. Philippe, zeichnet auf Seite 154 der Broschüre.
 
Tatsächlich lasse ich mich von der Ästhetik dieser Mädchen verführen, die Jean Boudriot am Bug von Boullongne entworfen haben. Diese Doucinen begrenzen die Füllung zwischen den Präzepten, die verhindern sollen, dass die Beine des Ankers daran hängen, wenn er gekreuzt wird, um ihn am Stay-Stay zu installieren. Ich habe diese elegante Zeichnung gefunden.
 
Aber als ich darüber nachdachte, wurde mir klar, dass es ein Unsinn war. Also habe ich es korrigiert. Ich habe die Doucinen durch 2 Reihen gebogener Dielen ersetzt, die der Kreisbewegung der Ankerlaschen auf allen DWG-Dielen folgen.
(...)
Seltsamerweise hat die in die Broschüre eingefügte Platine Nummer 36 im Maßstab 1/144 das Layout dieser Doucines beibehalten, während der PDF-Druck für jede der Maßstäbe aus der gleichen DWG-Ebene erstellt wurde.
Ich finde keine Erklärung für ihre Anwesenheit auf der Tafel Nr. 36 auf den Maßstab 1/144 reduziert. Dieser ist rein zufällig. Wir müssen es einfach ignorieren.
 
 
"Wenn Sie arbeiten, machen Sie Fehler.
Wenn Sie weniger arbeiten, machen Sie weniger Fehler.
Wenn Sie überhaupt keine Fehler machen
du wirst befördert. "
Deutsches Sprichwort
 
 
@ James H :
Ich würde gerne mit jemandem wie Ihnen zusammenarbeiten, der bereit ist, sie von Grund auf neu zu bauen - wie ich in einigen Jahren als PoB (Rumpf) -Modell.  

Aber eine größere Frage könnte interessant sein:
 
"Welcher Ritter oder welcher Vasall wird so mutig sein
, um in den Golf unten einzutauchen?"
See! I hurl in its depths a goblet of gold,
Already the waters over it flow.
The man who can bring hack the goblet to me,
May keep it henceforward, - his own it shall be.
Friedrich von Schiller,  Der Taucher *
(1797 für den Musen-Almanach)
 
Finden wir hier sechs ehrenwerte Mitstreiter einer Baugruppe, die sich mit der Schönheit der SAINT PHILIPPE messen wollen?

 

 

______________

https://germanstories.vcu.edu/schiller/taucher_dual.html

  
Edited by Heinrich der Seefahrer
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Posted (edited)
On 7/12/2019 at 2:17 PM, Kevin said:

Does anyone else do anything like this? Lol the wife has said i can have it, but only  if i can scccesfully build the cutty sark in 1/48

My wife* told me this isn't women's logic thinking! So look what a beauty she is:

 

IMG_20190102_061113.png.2372b17546867a8cc840c4356efb40e9.png

IMG_20190102_060608.thumb.png.7ad02887fdb518b3b60ef03ab914482f.png

These are thr two models at RochefortIMG_20190102_055449.thumb.png.161040e3af49eb889451ea0eebe0e4f8.png

IMG_20190102_060338.thumb.png.cbc998aa3083629601e6990a2a4f2594.png

- buy the book

- copy the plans to scale

-  tell her you are building the CUTTY SARK

- and by a plenty of enormous errors and titanian bad luck you got out with the SAINT PHILIPPE ;)

- there was nothing you could do about the MSW-forum misleaded you.

 

I think the SP is such a big project that we all together will support you in the very first phase of the start - so we all in here are to blame by your wife for being

 

giphy.gif.e79bd5a59b7b02a46c18675f0e558b17.gif

grumpyest and stubbornnessial old men. And I am shure we will hold out to  be blamed to behave in our natural way! What du you think?

 

 

__________________________

*We (Me, Myself, I & my wife)  in here also discussed the problem of enough space for the "a sunkings' foot is an inch"* scale - and after she realised the momentum of the hull this dwindled the SP down to a 1/92 version :(**  or she would use the 1/12 hull as a bed 4,28m long... And with 204,8 g wight of the boardside Berlins well-fortified bed!   

 ** .. as she is used to metric I tryed to keep thinks paedagogicly simple :D

*** Parturiunt montes, nascetur ridiculus mus.

 

Edited by Heinrich der Seefahrer
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11 minutes ago, Heinrich der Seefahrer said:

My wife* told me this isn't women's logic thinking! So

 

- buy the book

- copy the plans to scale

-  tell her you are building the CUTTY SARK

- and by a plenty of enormous errors and titanian bad luck you got out with the SAINT PHILIPPE ;)

- there was nothing you could do abozut the MSWforum misleaded you.

I think the SP is such a big project that we all together will support you in the very first phase of the start - so we all in here are to blame by your wife. And I am shure we will hold out - when you'll dio the same for us! 

 

 

__________________________

*We (Me, Myself, I & my wife)  in here also discussed the problem of enough space for the "a sunkings' foot is an inch"* scale - and after she realised the momentum of the hull this dwindled the SP down to a 1/92 version :(**  or she would use the 1/12 hull as a bed 4,28m long... And with 204,8 g wight of the boardside Berlins well-fortified bed!   

 ** .. as she is used to metric I tryed to keep thinks paedagogicly simple :D

*** Parturiunt montes, nascetur ridiculus mus.

 

lol that makes life so much simpler 

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39 minutes ago, druxey said:

Well, James, aren't you the lucky reviewer! 

 

It's a real privilege. There will be another Ancre review in about a week too.  

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I agree with the review, but I wish that the enclosed monograph, itself, were also hard-cover bound.

 

That and a few niggling construction details aside (and I am certainly no expert), I find the St. Philippe monograph to be an astounding piece of work, and an invaluable resource to anyone interested in modeling this epoch. Even at 1:144 - the scale pictured in the monograph book - the ship would produce a satisfying model.

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No harm at all, LH! One way to procrastinate completing your dissertation, unless you were crafty enough to make St Philippe your subject....

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, druxey said:

No harm at all, LH! One way to procrastinate completing your dissertation, unless you were crafty enough to make St Philippe your subject....

not quite.   I study Advanced Manufacturing, and this volume came a bi too latee to build it into a 3D model so I can use additive manufacturing techniques to build her:P

Edited by Landrotten Highlander

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