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Awful website but sander looks very good - most of parts made of metal!!!. I bookmarked this item for future consideration.

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Posted (edited)

The pictures are kind of vague..

 

Where's the motor?

 

 

P.S.

 

O.K.   I googled it and see there is a hand crank..  Interesting.

That would really limit it's usefulness in my opinion.

That would be some good information to provide on the web site.

Edited by Gregory

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I agree... the web site is bad. At first I thought this "hand cranked" sander was not for me. But when I thought about the types of sanding I do I began to think I could use this product. My "shop" is 6' x 12' and doubles as our office. With my current electric sander dust collection is a problem. Also some of my sanding needs are minor angle changes or touch ups so a hand cranked sander would work well. I also like the way angles can be adjusted. One downside (I think) is the inability to make compound angle cuts because the table isn't adjustable. ( I need to recheck the web site to check out the deck.)...Moab

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Moab, this is exactly my thoughts. I do not need electrically powered industrial size disk sander. My models are very small scale. I would use it just on rare occasions. As matter of fact I do not own one currently and not even sure when I could use this thing in building process. But thing looks cool. Hand powered one might be what I may be using. I however do not know what this product is. It is described so unclear at their site. Does the table tilt? I cannot see. Also item is made in Canada but price is in US $. Also it is very expensive. Looks fishy. May be site sells just pictures? Just a scam?

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Posted (edited)

$225 is a fair bit of change for a hand-cranked sander (apparently) without an accurate tilting table for compound angles and only a rubber disk pad. For another $100, you get a 1/3 hp motor and a highly accurate miter gauge and tilting table with preset angles and variable angle setting and with a thick (1/2" IIRC) disk plate that stores a lot of momentum, so no lagging when the piece connects with the disk. The Byrnes sander has a larger table of CNC machined aluminum. The Byrnes sander also has a very effective dust collection system that hooks up to any shop-vac. Then, too, the Byrnes sander has solid resale value and a manufacturer that stands behind it with a long track record of superior customer satisfaction.  Just sayin'. 

  http://www.byrnesmodelmachines.com/discsander5.html

 

DiskSander800.png

Edited by Bob Cleek

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Been using the Dremel version of grsjax's sander for decades, it is indeed a workhorse.

 

I wrote a log on improving the disk table a while back Modifications to a Dremel Belt/Disk Sander

 

You'll have to do a search, I don't know how to paste a link to it.

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12 hours ago, Gregory said:

I think I would spend $87 on one of these:

 

Harbor Freight

 

Before I would spend $225 on the " Ultimation " sander..

I changed my mind about this "Ultimation" tool. I imagined how would I had to use one hand to rotate the crank and other hand to hold part against the disc. They said "ultimate" precision? I think now this product is crap.

Byrnes disc sander is probably a Cadillac of modelling sanders. The one Gregory posted above is a working horse but for a modeller as I am it is a monstrously large. I work at my condo suite so on small scale models so I have no space or need for such large tool.

Please take a look at the wool I found on Canadian Amazon. It looks as some parts are plastic. Price is good.

 

https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B07SFZGHVQ/ref=ox_sc_saved_title_4?smid=A3F2CZ8RBTQB31&psc=1

 

Otherwise next size model (5" disc) moderately priced is here:

 

https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B078QWL1JB/ref=ox_sc_saved_title_2?smid=A3DWYIK6Y9EEQB&psc=1

 

or even this one same size but suspiciously cheap:

 

https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B01BSPALZO/ref=ox_sc_saved_title_3?smid=A1H137R4NNX9G3&psc=1

 

 

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I have the Dremel disc/belt combo - kicks up a dust storm - relegated to the wood shop where the dust doesn't matter. 

Got the Byrnes disc sander - it captures 99.9% of the dust, and is a world apart from the Dremel unit.  I was impressed that the Byrnes unit keeps spinning for darn near a full minute after killing the power - that's a matter of mass and great balance.  The disc runs true with no movement along the axis - the Dremel quits spinning in about 3 seconds and there is very noticeable movement along the axis. 

The Dremel disc will never be used on a model again - the belt is OK for non-model use but when the last belt I have is worn out the garbage guy can have the unit.

All that said I personally think it's a better unit than the one that started this thread.

Kurt

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, kurtvd19 said:

I have the Dremel disc/belt combo - kicks up a dust storm - relegated to the wood shop where the dust doesn't matter. 

Got the Byrnes disc sander - it captures 99.9% of the dust, and is a world apart from the Dremel unit.  I was impressed that the Byrnes unit keeps spinning for darn near a full minute after killing the power - that's a matter of mass and great balance.  The disc runs true with no movement along the axis - the Dremel quits spinning in about 3 seconds and there is very noticeable movement along the axis. 

The Dremel disc will never be used on a model again - the belt is OK for non-model use but when the last belt I have is worn out the garbage guy can have the unit.

All that said I personally think it's a better unit than the one that started this thread.

Kurt

I have to agree with Kurt. I've broke my own tool-buying rule more often that I'd like to admit: "Never buy a tool until you actually need it and then buy the best quality tool you can possibly afford." Like Kurt and probably most serious modelers, I have a "collection" of small power tools that I bought before I knew better, or when I was trying to save money, and which turned out to be a waste of money rather than a savings. A lot of them are still made and sold by companies that offer them for modeling use. Some, such as the Chinese-built knock-off sanders mentioned above, are "adequate" for those who haven't had the opportunity to know the difference. Quality tools do cost more, but when one considers how long they will last, the value of the work they can do, the pleasure to be had in using them, and even the resale value if one loses interest and wants to unload them, they are a wise investment and a bargain, considering their intrinsic value. 

 

I've highlighted the differences Kurt notes in his post above. I'd opt for any of the three power tools Byrnes makes, the table saw, disk sander, and thickness sander, over any other for the fact alone that they are virtually "dust free" when hooked up to a shop vac. You could use them in your living room and never have to think about dust.  There's more to it than that, though. For the purpose of scale modeling, accuracy is everything. Fine tools cost more because they are manufactured to operate at close tolerances.... in the case of Jim Byrnes' machines, tolerances of a thousandth of an inch and even half that, consistently and dependably. They have considerable mass because weight equals accuracy. For that reason, their working surfaces and adjusting mechanisms are made of CNC-machined solid aluminum plate, not stamped sheet metal and plastic or pot metal castings. Their fit and finish is impeccable, like a fine scientific instrument. They have expensive bearings because those also ensure accuracy. They have expensive motors because horsepower again means accuracy. If you examine the lower-priced products, you will note that their miter gauges and fences are often plastic, which wears and soon becomes useless for producing highly accurate work, The indexing on the low-priced tools is stamped or cast into the plastic parts, rather than machined or photo-etched into metal parts. There is no way a plastic setting knob is ever going to be capable of dependably holding a position to a fine tolerance. 

 

Plenty of ship models have been built with a razor blade and a tack hammer, but if you are going to spend money on tools, cheap ones are the most expensive ones in the end.

 

 

Edited by Bob Cleek

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I'm that way also, Gregory.   It still could be though.  I"ve looked at the product and scratched my head.  Not a product I'd use.

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No you have not been spammed. i just thought that depending on the scale of your project that the hand control would be more useful. At 1/72 a powered sander could remove more than you need just with a touch. A hand crank that stops and starts immediately would also be a benefit. Not for everybody judging from the comments.

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I have a belt/disc sander combo as in picture but a no-name brand.

It's doing a good job when no-precision sanding is required, but is very noisy in comparison to Byrnes disc sander.
I am some 100 dollars away from buying a Byrnes sander. Have the thickness sander of his and am very happy.

And it's very quiet too. Have an old Proxxon "workhorse" table saw that works real well, so the disc sander is more in consideration than Byrnes table saw.

 

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Spending 200+ USD seems to be a bit over the top. Hand-cranking seems to be attractive because of the speed control, but co-ordinating the two movements is not easy. I solved the problem through a speed-control and a foot-switch. You can put an ordinary plug-type dimmer (with the apropriate rating) between the disc-sander and the wall-socket and you got your speed-control.

 

I built myself a micro disc-sander around the headstock of a watchmakers lathe: https://www.maritima-et-mechanika.org/tools/microgrinder/microgrinder.html

 

And I also made this little hand-sander: https://www.maritima-et-mechanika.org/tools/handsander/handsander.html

 

Dust is not really a problem, considering the small quantities of material taken off.

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Wow, wefalck

Where did you get so much cool watchmaker's stuff? All these miniature fixtures could be really useful for my small scale work. Your small (I guess about 70 mm DIA) disc sander is just right size I could use. So far my need of a disc sander (I have got no any) was just when I need to miter some curved bulwark handrails at 90 degrees. Now I do this holding a 1.5 mm x 5 mm plank in my hands filing the ends down with a fine file and then fine sandpaper glued to a wood stick. It takes a long while till I get it to right size. Using a disc sander would speed me up ten fold.

IMG_0016.jpg

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Well, I have been collecting these for about 30 years now ...

 

The sanding discs are of various diameters, ranging from 40 to 70 mm. I have flat disc onto which wet-and-dry paper of various grades is stuck and diamond discs of various grades. I quite like the diamond discs, but they are not easy to get to run flat, though I have good arbors. They are quite cheap, so perhaps I should sacrifice one side and stick them to a flat running thick wood or metal disc.

 

It would be quite simple to build yourself a disc sander with the various components that are now available cheaply from ebay.

 

For really delicate work, I find that most commercial machines run too fast. Some times you need to take off just a few 1/100 mm in order to fit a piece. I am running the 40 mm diamond discs at around 100 rpm only.

 

Work holding is the major challenge, if you have really small parts. So I made various kind of clamps with defined edges/surfaces that can be guided by the fences.

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