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Milling cherry logs

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Hello, apologies if this is not correct forum for this type of question. I have a pile of cherry logs, app 3in in diameter and about foot long. I would like to mill it so i can use it in model building. I do have a 9in wood band saw, mini table saw, a planer and "normal" table saw. Logs still have a bark on it and they went thru some "drying" process laying on the floor in my shop.

I am not sure how to attack it to get the most of it for ship building so any suggestion/how-tos will be much appreciated.

Also, any recommendation in which stage of ship modelling i can use this type of wood (deck planking, deck furniture, etc) would be appreciated.

 

 

 

Thanks...

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Posted (edited)

I think you can use the same technique shown in this video    Even tho he is using a horizontal  bandsaw I think the same technique can be used with a vertical bandsaw, especially since your logs are only 12 inches long and 3 inches in diameter. 

Edited by Jack12477

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Posted (edited)

Black Cherry is useful for most everything.  The color would be a bit eccentric for spars and deck planking.  But frames timbers, beams, hull planking, bits,  a lot of antebellum merchantmen seemed to have clear finish Spanish Mahogany for hatch coming and similar trim and when oxidized - time - Black Cherry is an excellent miniature replication.   If you have Sweet Cherry,  the color is a lot less red, but the grain is about the same.

 

Now milling from logs is a different thing.  To reduce checking and splits during the drying process,  it is imperative that the cut ends and branch cuts be sealed.  The last thing I used for this is left over latex enamel paint and used paper towels to glob on a thick coat.  Anything liquid, which when dry blocks water.

3 inch logs on a 9" band saw - too thick - both for clearance and motor power.  Find a local wood workers club and team up with someone with a larger band saw.  Buy your own blade to fit his saw.  Get a bimetal blade - initial cost is higher - all steel blades dull quickly and break when pushed when dull.

 

You need two perpendicular cuts.  A log wants to roll.  A 1/2" thick board - edge against the fence - riding on the table - Use right angle framing braces and long #10 or so screws to fix the log to this 1/2" carrier.  After the first cut, the cut face goes on the board - After the second cut, the carrier is no longer needed.  

I do 1:60 scale POF - 2 inch thick billets are working well foe me now.  At least 2 years drying time for this.

Edited by Jaager

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2 hours ago, Jaager said:

Black Cherry is useful for most everything.  The color would be a bit eccentric for spars and deck planking.  But frames timbers, beams, hull planking, bits,  a lot of antebellum merchantmen seemed to have clear finish Spanish Mahogany for hatch coming and similar trim and when oxidized - time - Black Cherry is an excellent miniature replication.   If you have Sweet Cherry,  the color is a lot less red, but the grain is about the same.

 

Now milling from logs is a different thing.  To reduce checking and splits during the drying process,  it is imperative that the cut ends and branch cuts be sealed.  The last thing I used for this is left over latex enamel paint and used paper towels to glob on a thick coat.  Anything liquid, which when dry blocks water.

3 inch logs on a 9" band saw - too thick - both for clearance and motor power.  Find a local wood workers club and team up with someone with a larger band saw.  Buy your own blade to fit his saw.  Get a bimetal blade - initial cost is higher - all steel blades dull quickly and break when pushed when dull.

 

You need two perpendicular cuts.  A log wants to roll.  A 1/2" thick board - edge against the fence - riding on the table - Use right angle framing braces and long #10 or so screws to fix the log to this 1/2" carrier.  After the first cut, the cut face goes on the board - After the second cut, the carrier is no longer needed.  

I do 1:60 scale POF - 2 inch thick billets are working well foe me now.  At least 2 years drying time for this.

 

Thank you very much for detailed replay, really appreciated. I think i will try to find some local woodworker, dont want to overuse my saw..

 

I believe it is a Sweet Cherry judging by your explanation.

 

Thanks again, much appreciated.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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3 hours ago, Jack12477 said:

I think you can use the same technique shown in this video    Even tho he is using a horizontal  bandsaw I think the same technique can be used with a vertical bandsaw, especially since your logs are only 12 inches long and 3 inches in diameter. 

Thanks, appreciated. I will try to do it with my saw but most likely will try to find someone local with more powerful saw...

 

Thanks again.

 

 

 

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Have you seen this thread?

The piece I put through in the pictures was the maximum the saw would take. I was using an 18 tpi blade and this was a mistake. It started out slow but OK, however the blade was finished by the third log. Now I use an eight tpi blade and it cuts smoothly without overloading the 350W motor.

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If they are three inch "logs," and you have a planer, why not just plane down one face until it's wide enough to lay flat against your planer fence and then plane another face, and so on, until it's square. You should be able to then cut what you need off the billets with your band saw or table saw. Let them dry with sealed ends, one year for each inch of thickness.

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22 hours ago, bruce d said:

Have you seen this thread?

No, thanks for a link, appreciated. I think i got the idea how to do it to save wood, saw and fingers..

 

 

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21 hours ago, Bob Cleek said:

have a planer,

I will definitely try this approach, never thought about it..

 

Appreciated,

 

Cheers

 

 

 

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