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Vane

In what order do you build your ships in?

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I do guess there are many ways to do it, but how does the build process look for you? Do u always start from page 1 in the instruction manual and work through everything in the "right order" or do you jump randomly back and forwards in the plans? Do you work on several kits in parallel?

 

 

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Edited by Vane

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When I did kits (and the one semi-scratch build) I started at page 1 but did jump around while glue was drying (especially during planking) to build bits and pieces that needed installing later.  I'm pretty much following that method doing my scratch build.  Have to something productive while the glue dries, right?

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Gidday all.

I usually read the instructions and accompanying photos, sometimes this leads to more confusion, as I like to get an overall idea of the build process. I do bounce around a bit as mark says in Post#2 building deck furniture or assembling masts etc. while waiting for things  to dry.

Very interesting subject and I am looking forward to others input.

Wishing you all the best.

Mark.

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Interesting question. I have a very linear mind and tend not to have several things running in parallel. I only work on one model at a time and then only one one step at a time. In theory it would be more efficient to jump around and build other parts ahead of time while working on an earlier step, but my mind just doesn't work like that. I like to think about the context of what I'm doing with each step and I can't do that if I'm way ahead (for example, building some bit of superstructure before the hull is finished). Part of this is that I've learned that I often like to change my plans as I go along, or adapt details to the way a project is going, so if I build ahead, I may end up with something I don't actually like or want when it's time to use that bit. Building every step to fit the model in front of me helps guarantee that I'll get what I want each step of the way.

 

I couldn't handle more than one project at once, though I'm quite susceptible to "dreaming ahead" when I'm not even halfway through a given project. Plus, I like to finish what I start and doing more than one thing at once seems to guarantee endless projects.

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I do one thing at a time. I scratch build and have to fabricate as I go along which means that some pieces have to wait until others are done in order to get the dimensions right. As an example, my current build is a two decker and I can't build the capstan until I have the exact height of the main/gun deck set. There are some things I could do such as carriages but one thing at a time works for me and helps to keep my clutter down.

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I can’t work on multiple projects in parallel or I end up with a huge number of unfinished projects.

 

 I will pause for a quick project to take a break when I have a large multi year project going and I need a small project that I can finish in a few days or a few hours.  Or a few months in the case of the Prince de Neufchatel.

 

As far as construction order goes, I try to look ahead so I don’t paint myself into a corner, so to speak.

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I tend to stick to one project at a time, but within a project it is necessary to plan ahead. You really need to be familiar with every step of the build before you start, otherwise you may find that you misunderstood how one of the later parts fits into the whole and find that you have to go back and reconstruct something. For me this is very frustrating!

 

In many cases I create my own plans for parts and assembly, even if it is a kit with plans. Kit plans often leave a lot to be desired! I read about how things worked on the real ships. That gives me a much better understanding of what it is I am building, and how it fits into the whole model.

 

For example, on my current build, while I was attaching the channels and chain plates to the hull I needed to know the angle of the shrouds from the mastheads to the channels in order to get the angles of the chain plates right. This required me to determine the heights on the masts where the shrouds attached, and that required a bit of study of the mast assemblies. I didn't actually construct the masts, but I learned how to do it.

 

Having said that, I am planning another 1:96 scratch build project of a guided missile cruiser. No plans existed for the ship so I worked 14 years to research and create a very accurate 3D CAD model to be used to create plans. After that I was pretty much burned out for a while on the cruiser project, so now I am "relaxing" with a revenue cutter kitbash build. But I started the kit build before I began working on the CAD model of the cruiser! One of these days I will restart the 1:96 scale project, and I suspect it will take several years to build it. I may alternate between the two builds in order to get a change of pace. Who knows which will be completed first?

 

The important thing is to enjoy what you are doing. If you lose your enthusiasm for one project, that is the time to put it on the shelf and work on something else. The first will keep, and will be there when you again have interest. Besides, in the interim you may discover something about the shelved project that will help you build a more satisfying model.

 

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15 hours ago, Vane said:

I have one huge problem and that is that I constantly think about what next projects to take on... if i dont stop myself i would probably have 10 opened boxes

 

There's a quote one of our members uses that applies: "Treat each part as if it were the complete model.  Pretty soon you'll be building more models in a month than many will do in a lifetime."  So you can buy all the kits you want, but just focus on one box at a time as it's full of models.

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i tend to bounce around but on the same model. currently building the De Ag Victory and have several start points.

ie the main build as per the instructions and also the ships boats as a separate project also have parts of the masts underway and other bits and pieces as well. one thing i find is that when i have completed each individual part it goes into a bag or box that is labelled accordingly with part and stage. then all those completed bits goes into another box for safety 

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Once I start a kit I am committing myself to finishing it before I start another one. I loose concentration and start making mistakes if I do too many things at once. You are also less likely to finish one, in my view. I am also not experienced enough yet to change the order in which the instructions are written. If the kits designer got to the finish line that way, I see no reason to mix it up.

I also don't break up repetitive tasks. Once I figured out the best way to do something and make a start, I keep going. The risk in taking long breaks is that the section before the break will look slightly different than the section after....lol

I do off course read ahead in the instructions and learn from the other logs on the forum.

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Working on several projects at the same time can be dangerous, as you may loose track of what you are doing and what you have been planning. Though it happens, that I slip a shorter project in between working on a long-term project.

 

When building from scratch, there are certain natural sequences, as certain parts have to be finished, before you can tackle others. For many details this is not so important and I can take on what I fancy or what seems to provide a particular manufacturing challenge. I may also work in parallel on different parts that require the same machine-tool set up. Or I stop working on something for a while that turns out to be too fiddly and continue with something else, where one can see more progress in shorter time. And then their is procrastination: some parts that seem to be too challenging or which there are different alternative routes I might push in front of me ...

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I have found that I can buy models faster than I can finish them. I wasn't able to pass up a "good deal". Then I realised, there will always be a "good deal".

I have since sold all of my stash. Someone else got a "good deal".

I have to keep my focus on one thing at a time  but I do sub assemblies while waiting for parts or glue/paint to dry. 

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Good topic and as usual, you will get as many different answers as people answering.

I usually work in strict order. One of my great pleasures is to go through all the manuals and instructions of a new kit while sipping my morning coffee. So the kit initially is built in a strict order, at least in my mind.

That being said, If I see a clear opportunity to do something  in a different order I go for it. As an example, some kits have the anchors as the final step... I (may) put them as soon as I finish the hull...

At this moment I'm in the process of rigging my Royal Louis. I am following the order of the lines in a strict order. Still not sure if this is the wisest thing to do. Time will tell.

Also, so far I have been working on one model at a time, but that was mainly due to lack of space. Since I moved to a new house with plenty of room (3 bedrooms all for my self ;) ) I've been thinking about working on two models at a time, and one being plastic and the other wood, to break monotony :) 

Cheers!

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