Jump to content
Bedford

Miss Caroline by Bedford - Scale 1:8 - model of my full size build

Recommended Posts

The baby sister is coming on nicely !

 

For the the D-profile, you could mill a groove into a straight piece of wood, temporarily glue the brass rod into it and then mill away as much as you need. However, I would have thought it to be possible to find half-round brass profiles at that size.

 

I am curious as to how you will be replicating the excellent leathering jobs on the full-size boat in 1:8 scale ;)

 

Edited by wefalck

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, wefalck said:

I am curious as to how you will be replicating the excellent leathering jobs on the full-size boat in 1:8 scale ;)

 

Mate, I knew I could count on you to consider the finer details :)

 

I have seen in one of Michael Motts models that he scraped the back of the leather to make it thinner so that's in the back of my mind, still not sure how I'll go actually fitting it though. As for the "D" brass, I can find half round in larger sizes but half round is the wrong shape anyway. Draw a 45mm diameter circle then rule a line 30mm long across it edge to edge and you'll see the kind of profile I need. 

 

I was considering making a steel guide with a tangential hole through which I could pull the brass past a mill bit but that would be begging to fail badly. Your idea of gluing it into wood is now at the top of the list. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Johann, in his log on the CREOLE, has shown a simple leather-splitter, kind of an inverse plane. Seems to work well for him for 1:48 scale stuff.

 

I cemented (with superglue) 20 mm sections of 0.4 mm copper wire onto a flat milling sub-table and turned it into 0.2 x 0.4 half-round stuff. The principle has been used by watchmakers for the last 150 years or so, employing what they called wax-chucks (the 'wax' was actually shellac), that is a small face-plate. What is obviously important is that the rod/wire is absolutely flat and perpendicular to the Z-axis of the mill. I would mill the groove and then leave the wood in situ for cementing the rod on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Superb.

Beautifully modelled.

If you did not come up with an idea for the brass rub rail here's my two pence.

Get some brass rod of the correct diameter and anneal it.

Then clamp it at one end to the bench and draw file it away from the clamp until you have the section you want?

Pete

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Peter, draw filing is a good option, I'll try milling it first as suggested above but your idea is filed in case that fails.

I am no stranger to the (as some see it) mystical world of soldering so I could easily do it in short lengths and solder together.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Keith, she's no Germania but she's going to be a nice model of a knock about dinghy.

 

The mast step is in and the floor boards are cut from left over mahogany. I've been trying to cut small blocks to go between the planks and toggles to hold them down but the wood keeps splintering so I'll glue the planks down and make individual "T" shapes to replicate the original setup, hopefully that will be easier.

 

DSCF1558.thumb.JPG.fac9dff7376eee15410f247b960b6322.JPGDSCF1561.thumb.JPG.a37064b43c09557e587b0d06f9039b30.JPGDSCF1563.thumb.JPG.75b6639d85856040c666799f68be0285.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I scraped the hull of the full size version while getting it on the trailer when I sailed it on Tuesday so I had to get the white paint out to effect the repair so while it was out...........

 

DSCF1571.thumb.JPG.fecfa2d82987e243ffb6ff37b185c5b5.JPGDSCF1572.thumb.JPG.a47e3ac04362f4c98538f052b2b2acbb.JPGDSCF1574.thumb.JPG.5dcbb3af7de615a18443589f30f1ae51.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It feels like building the real boat, I'm doing pretty much everything the same way only it's nice to be able to pick it up and turn it over or around!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stern sheets made, now to do 4 more cleats for the sheet bearers then I can finish of this part of the build and varnish out the hull then glue all the sheet planks in. Then onto the breast hooks etc.

 

DSCF1580.thumb.JPG.0684e24db088793690e484145d5d67f9.JPGDSCF1581.thumb.JPG.8df28cf43da51c76711b0310c6cd977d.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Bedford, You have been busy, what a beautiful job you are doing on the model! looks like the same superb standard that you executed on the big one. Regarding the thin leather I eventually opted for some very thin commercial dress leather that was picked up at a thrift store it was a ladies leather skirt before I took it apart.

 

michael

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

About us

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research

SSL Secured

Your security is important for us so this Website is SSL-Secured

NRG Mailing Address

Nautical Research Guild
237 South Lincoln Street
Westmont IL, 60559-1917

About the NRG

If you enjoy building ship models that are historically accurate as well as beautiful, then The Nautical Research Guild (NRG) is just right for you.

The Guild is a non-profit educational organization whose mission is to “Advance Ship Modeling Through Research”. We provide support to our members in their efforts to raise the quality of their model ships.

The Nautical Research Guild has published our world-renowned quarterly magazine, The Nautical Research Journal, since 1955. The pages of the Journal are full of articles by accomplished ship modelers who show you how they create those exquisite details on their models, and by maritime historians who show you the correct details to build. The Journal is available in both print and digital editions. Go to the NRG web site (www.thenrg.org) to download a complimentary digital copy of the Journal. The NRG also publishes plan sets, books and compilations of back issues of the Journal and the former Ships in Scale and Model Ship Builder magazines.

Our Emblem

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research
×
×
  • Create New...