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Bedford

Miss Caroline by Bedford - Scale 1:8 - model of my full size build

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I know someone, who is really envious of the 1:1 version, but even once he will have the time (after retirement), he will not have the space (living in a city appartment) nor the right aqueous environment (though will be living at the coast) for this kind of boat 

😭

 

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I am thinking of a sturdy sea-boat, something like one of those replica Cornish Crabbers or indeed a Catalan type that is more suited to the relatively unsheltered coast off Valencia, but my wife thinks more of a motorboat ...

 

Or one of those traditional lateen-rigged boats that are used on the lagoon just south of Valencia: https://www.maritima-et-mechanika.org/maritime/albufera/Boats-of-the-Albufera.html. Would be a challenge, as I never sailed a lateen-rig. Will have to explore all this once we are settled down there.

 

https://www.maritima-et-mechanika.org/maritime/albufera/Fig-01-72.jpg

 

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Another one tricked ...

👹

... it is actually a low resolution photograph worked over in picture editors on my iPad and Mac. I outlined the main contours (the ApplePencil comes handy for that) in a transparent layer and using the 'watercolour' function juidicially in Photoshop before merging the two in Photoshop on the Mac. Should really become honest again and redevelop my skills with the pen and brush ;)

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Steve I really enjoyed the sailing video, I agree with Druxey your friends mainsheet is fouled probably because he was more concerned with teaching you and missed it The old saying about "there is nothing so nice as messing about in boats" comes to mind. The beauty of such small boats it that you really do get to feel the vagaries of our natural world and all its foibles, which teach us the best things in life.

 

Michael

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I don't know why I missed this MSW thread before but in reading through the progression of the build, not with standing the full scale "model", it is such a beauty and like others like Michael you are gifted! I have such a fondness for small craft. Perhaps it is because of their basic beauty or maybe it is just their fundamental essence and grace.

Joe

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Eberhard, you have a conundrum!

 

Michael and Joe, thanks.

Yes you become very aware of the slight changes in the breeze direction and strength as well as the tide and I still have so much to learn.

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I got a set of micro drills last week and they've been very handy despite the steep learning curve using such fine drills in a machine, I broke the 0.3mm while getting the 0.4mm out! I cross drilled three of the 0.8mm pins with the 0.4mm bit before it snapped on the way out after drilling the hole, I think a bit of swarf came up with the drill and jammed it. I had to drill the remaining three holes with the 0.5mm bit which required very accurate centering leaving only 0.15mm either side of the hole. I couldn't hold the pins in a collet because I haven't got one small enough so I just clamped them in the machine vice and then used the 1mm bit to start the hole to prevent the smaller drill running off the side of the pin and breaking. The wire I used to put through the pin is 0.3mm diameter

 

The pins were cut just past the holes

 

DSCF1775.thumb.JPG.32887aaa4433b92ec6014681766b545e.JPGDSCF1781.thumb.JPG.586445cee9a63f96442fae92c2dbe606.JPGDSCF1779.thumb.JPG.ed7db1a2259d24c8901c5cbfb4af2a16.JPG

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These carbide drills are very brittle. There are HSS drills down to 0.1 mm with shafts of 1 mm. Normally, they are ridicously expensive, but I got boxes full of old 'new' stock through ebay from a workshop sell-out or something like this. Standard HSS twist drills with a shaft as thick as the drill are available down to 0.3 mm at a reasonable price. I only use my carbide drills, when I am sure that they won't wander or slip.

 

People make themselves cross-drilling jigs. This can be a piece of square rod in which you drill a hole lengthwise of the diameter of the material to be drill and another one exactly perpendicular and centric to the first one. The material around the lengthwise hole doesn't have to be very thick. It should just prevent the drill from slipping off round material that is difficult to centre-punch and keeps your drill on centre line.

 

It can also be helpful to flatten the area to be drilled with a small end-mill that cuts across the centre. This give the drill less chances to slip.

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Yeah Eberhard I considered making something better to hold the pins but I only needed 6 and have about 500 to work with. I'll have to keep my eyes open for better HSS drills but these are cheap and plentiful

 

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Actually, yes, these carbide drills are available 'used' quite cheaply. In various manufacturing industries they are replaced by 'pre-emptive' maintenance before they really get worn. It is cheaper to regularly change the drills in production than to throw away poor or damanged parts. The drills are still good enough for our applications.

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8 hours ago, Bedford said:

but I only needed 6 and have about 500 to work with.

Yes Steve that's how I work. "Only a few to do so I will short cut it". When I am done I usually look back and think it would have been simpler and quicker to do it by the approved method.

I actually break more micro dills by dropping them a few inches on to the milling table than by drilling with them - I am an expert at it. I now buy every size in multiples of 10 - one of each size just doesn't cut it.

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Yeah Keith, I'm replacing the broken drills with 10 packs. The HSS ones Eberhard mentioned would be great but I haven't found any and these are cheap. As for work holding I still have patience to learn in that area, I'll always try the quick easy way first but I can generally tell when I need to go the long route before I start something. 

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Keith,

Get a thin layer of foam (maybe packaging type) and lay in on the mill bed when changing bits.   I started doing it because they'd  hit the bed and run off into space.  Now they stay on the bed.

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On 2/18/2020 at 1:39 AM, Bedford said:

I got a set of micro drills last week and they've been very handy despite the steep learning curve using such fine drills in a machine, I broke the 0.3mm while getting the 0.4mm out! I cross drilled three of the 0.8mm pins with the 0.4mm bit before it snapped on the way out after drilling the hole, I think a bit of swarf came up with the drill and jammed it. I had to drill the remaining three holes with the 0.5mm bit which required very accurate centering leaving only 0.15mm either side of the hole. I couldn't hold the pins in a collet because I haven't got one small enough so I just clamped them in the machine vice and then used the 1mm bit to start the hole to prevent the smaller drill running off the side of the pin and breaking. The wire I used to put through the pin is 0.3mm diameter

 

The pins were cut just past the holes

 

DSCF1775.thumb.JPG.32887aaa4433b92ec6014681766b545e.JPG

 

Steve you need to buy some #000 Centering Combined drill and countersink bit, the drill bit is .020" body is 1/8" dia and they are used before you use the drill bits you bought once you use these you will not have any more drills slip off and break.

 

Regards

Richard

 

 

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