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Overworked724

USS Syren 1803 by Overworked724 – Model Shipways – Scale 1:64

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"Bringing in the Sheaves"...continued.

 

So I cut out the holes for the single and double sheaves.  After cutting the sheave holes, I reset the piece on it's side in the mini vise on my x-y table at the proper angle to drill the hole for the axle (is that the proper term) which will be 0.50mm brass wire.  For each section of wood, I could make 4 blocks comfortably, so made eight (8) singles and four (4) doubles.  I like to think I made this many to pick the 'best of the lot', but it's really because I know me and I screw up a lot!

 

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After getting the sections predrilled, I did a brief sanding using 400 grit sandpaper.  I cut some strips that would slide into the sheave holes, and connected them (back to back) in my mini-vice.  Then I just slid them into the sheave and I could do a touch up sand on both sides of the hole’s interior.  (I'm not looking for perfect...I'm looking for decent!)

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Afterwards, I cut my little sheaves from the mini-Skulpy noodle, and lined them up with the axle holes.  You'll notice the Skulpy sheave in the pic below has a hole in it.  I just ran my pin vise with a little drill bit down the center (again - I'm just eye balling here but it worked.)

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I got the wire set in the block with CA by touching one side of the wire with CA and slowly pulling the other end through until the wire seized in the wood.  Then I trimmed off both sides and sanded with my 220 girt sanding stick (my most useful tool!).  Now the strips with the sheaves can be put away until I'm ready to cut the individual blocks to place on the ship.  

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The blocks have enough room on front/back to sand down if required.  Not sure if they are accurate, but this is the best I can do with them...and I prefer these over drilling holes and simulating the sheaves by carving.  I don't trust my expertise enough in carving to do that...

 

Moving on....

:cheers:

 

 

 

 

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Didn't think of this until now....but this little side trip into making the sheave blocks is identical to how I would make the sheaves for the catheads.  The block height for the double sheaves in the stern bulkhead is roughly the same as the cathead width...awesome.  One less thing.  :piratetongueor4:

 

And what's funny is that I just imagined a simple jig to make reproducible cross sections with exact thickness...will try on the catheads!!

 

Moving on...

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10 hours ago, niwotwill said:

Patrick your fixed blocks with the sheaves came out really nice. kudos for a job well done. I never thought of using sculpey for my sheaves instead of turning them from wood.

Thanks, Will!  Very much appreciated!!  Like you, I get ideas from other build logs and read yours as well.  Many different ways to simulate the sheaves. I liked your approach to making the sheaves.  Since I don’t have a mill or mini-lathe, I needed to go a bit out of the box...which is the fun part of our gentle hobby.  
 

But...Making them is one thing...getting them on the ship is another. Seems Jesse’s build log was the right approach. Have the sheave blocks made and make the openings for them as you plank up the exterior bulkheads.  🤔

 

I’ll make the block openings before I put in the shear strake. So I’m now working on that approach while I continue to noodle over planking. 
 

Planking is going slow...but here are a couple of boring pics. 😊

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Moving on...!

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Took a stab at trying to install one of my earlier sheave blocks. I used the earlier faux deck made of basswood and added some filler blocks to simulate the thickness of the bulkhead. 
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In the end, after making a horrible mess, I was able to get the block into my fake bulkhead. It’s ok...but It’s not as clean as I’d like.  I wish I’d have made clean openings to instal the blocks while building up the exterior bulkheads. 😣Sanding sticks and pin vise with drill bit...

 

I’ll be sweating bullets when trying to make these slots. 🙄

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OK...

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I wonder if making the block the same width as the plank might have made fitting it in a bit easier?

 

But then I'm not familiar with your build or the proper scale. So I could be way off base here.

 

 

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8 minutes ago, CPDDET said:

I wonder if making the block the same width as the plank might have made fitting it in a bit easier?

HI Dave.  The single blocks I made exactly one plank width.  The double blocks are by necessity a bit wider, but those should be slightly easier to cut as the stern area has no bulkhead behind that are of planking.  

 

I'll do my best!

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Looks really great.   I might have lost my mind trying to work out those tiny sheaves - perhaps I will when I get there.   Definitely understand how work gets in the way, I had a great productive few months and now Im all bogged down myself with "emergent issues." Though, your description is a bit more gracious that mine might be... :)

 

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Patrick your fixed blocks look great and as to installing them I found it easier to cut the double that the single blocks and you can see on the plans that the double is larger than 1 plank width. I found it best to install my blocks prior to the internal bulwark planking. With the blocks in place I could trim the planks to fit as needed. Just a note about fixed blocks: These blocks were designed and installed with the need to replace worn/broken blocks while at sea, so they should be somewhat loosely fitted. (don't remember where I read about replacing fixed blocks at sea but I think it was in one of Ed Tosti's logs)

 

Stay Well

Will :pirate41:

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I did plan to make the holes after sanding down the inner bulwarks and prior to installing the inner bulkhead planking.  The problem I referred to is in the technique needed to make straight edges to the holes, and making the holes themselves...without marring the hull overmuch.  

 

We shall see!! 

 

Moving on... 

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10 minutes ago, CPDDET said:

I find that hard to believe. Perhaps frustrated, but no worse than that.

Well, Dave...I'd say as a beginner, I'm probably right where I should be as my efforts are barely passable as far as I can tell.  I see a crap ton of wood filler in my future!  I had some initial thoughts of trying to get the hull planking done in a way that might allow me the option of leaving the hull natural and forgo the copper plating.  But I don't think that will be possible.  I'm doing ok...nothing horribly bad, but it's going a bit rough...the stern especially...

 

I have learned a couple of things first hand that I will not forget for my next model:

1. Basswood strips are absolute crap.  The basswood strips that came in my kit are bad even for basswood...knots everywhere, dry as a bone, and grainy as all get out.  After I get the hull planked, I'm not using basswood again.

2. If I ever do another plank on bulkhead I will be using filler blocks between every bulkhead frame.  I can see the imperfect depressions between the frames where I don't have fillers...and planking the bow and the stern area without full surface area makes the planking that much harder to put on.  So filler blocks it is...live and learn

3. Spiling or trimming planks is a mystery to me.  I need to technique to make uniformly trimmed planks.  Have no clue how other people do it...I'm using a razor blade and a ruler!  (I'm equipment challenged)

 

Ok....off to bed.  Pics to follow a bit later!

 

Moving on...to dreamland.

 

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Patrick you are not alone with the planking problems we've all been there and done that and I still have the same feelings each time I plank another boat. Search the msw logs and find ones the appeal to you and see what they've done. There are many tutorials on the subject and you'll find them on the msw logs and web searches. Chuck Passaro has written about lining off the frames and planking from there, I used that system on my Syren and was very happy with the results. Chuck also has videos of how he planked the group project HMS Winchelsea Google "youtube Chuck Passaro" and you will see all for videos about 30 minutes total.

 

Hope this helps

Stay Well and Safe

Will  :pirate41:

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Hi Will. Thank you. Yes, I’ve read many many blogs and watched several vids. I am attempting to use the method lining off the frames. As with all things, seeing is one thing, doing and developing the skill set is another. 😏
 

Again, my problem is understanding the technique needed to consistently thin down a plank. 
 

it’s funny you mention the Winchelsea. That’s probably going to be my next build...which could be a few years out at the rate I’m going. 🤔


Thanks for the helpful feedback on Chuck’s YouTube vids. I’ll check them out!

 

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I couldn't agree more on the basswood issue. Just not the best wood for the best results.

 

My plan is to slog through my Bluenose using what I have, doing my best and learning as I go. But my next build will be a larger scale, simpler ship which I will attempt to scratch build. 

 

I've already purchased the half hull planking tutorial and think I need to back up and relearn how to walk before trying to run. 

 

Right now I know more about brain surgery than wood, so a huge learning curve there also.

 

And tools is something else I need to think seriously about if I plan to commit to this hobby.

 

It's great to have this forum as a sounding board.

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