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I am considering building the Model Shipways Kate Cory.  I have looked at a number of logs and Model Shipways model ship instructions and practicums and find two approaches to carving.  They are to either leave the bulwarks on and carve away or cut them off at the start and add them later. The practicum on the Sultana is fairly clear that the bulwarks on the raw hull should be taken off. The Kate Cory instructions say cutting bulwarks off is an option.  The Phantom, Dapper Tom and Elsie don't seem to mention an option.  My question is this, from experienced solid hull builders, what is the easiest and/or best approach to to take?  My previous experience with solid hull builds was an old Scientific Models Cutty Sark which had no bulwarks on the raw hull.

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Cutting down to the top of the deck beam level and using veneer for the bulwarks - getting a uniform plank thickness is easier.  It also allows for an easier way to do the removable opening. It is also helpful if the upper works planking is simulated using extra thin veneer from the copper to the rail.

 

Consider this also,  if you copper, and the material that has been supplied has simulated nails, replace it with flat stock.  To avoid the new penny look, age it.  A flame treatment works,  but to get a dependable bond - the glue side needs to have the oxide layer that the flame produced = removed.

There are chemical aging agents.

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    I have tried both methods and as I am currently building the Phantom, I am of the opinion that they should be taken off.  I took it one step farther, by carving the additional thickness of the planking off of that portion of the hull above the coppered bottom. (There was no reason to carve and re-plank below the coppered area as it will be covered anyway.)  Then I notched the hull for the stanchions to give me something to apply the planked bulwarks to.  (This also makes it easier to put the scuppers in.)  The only thing that I would do different would be to put a very slight bevel to edge of the planks, as once the hull is painted it is very hard to discern the individual planks. :(

    If you have access to old issues of Seaways Ships-In-Scale magazine in the May/June 1992 issue, there is a description of a process similar to my method used by Robert Evans on building your MS Kate Cory kit. 

    There is also an article on building the Mary Taylor by Clare Hess in the same magazine from the March/April through July/August 2013 issues using a similar method.  

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Thank you Jaager and Betaqdave, I believe you have laid a good case for cutting the bulwarks off. I was somewhat hesitant to do this as it seemed drastic and definite. Do either of you or does anyone in the community have a copy of the articles Betaqdave mentioned who could make me a copy since I am sure they are no longer in print?  I would also be willing to purchase a copy of the magazines.  Thanks again for your help as I will probably cut them off. 

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I wonder why the included instruction manuals still favor carving the bulwarks and refer to cutting them off only as an option?  Is it perhaps just left over from another age??  It seems that the carving machines could be easily refigured or else perhaps they made a big run some time ago and have a big stock.

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4 hours ago, Jaager said:

Consider this also,  if you copper, and the material that has been supplied has simulated nails, replace it with flat stock.  To avoid the new penny look, age it.  A flame treatment works,  but to get a dependable bond - the glue side needs to have the oxide layer that the flame produced = removed.

There are chemical aging agents.

Is it possible to use chemical aging by applying Metal Black with a Q-tip or brush after the copper is applied?  I would not want to have the glue run or loosen the plates,

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37 minutes ago, Dr PS - Paul Schulze said:

Do either of you or does anyone in the community have a copy of the articles Betaqdave mentioned who could make me a copy since I am sure they are no longer in print?  I would also be willing to purchase a copy of the magazines.  Thanks again for your help as I will probably cut them off. 

The entire collection of Ships in Scale (except for 2011-2018 - coming soon) is available from the NRG store as Jaeger said.  NRG members get a 20% discount from the prices shown.

If you just want the one article contact the NRG office - see the web site for phone - ask Mary to have me make you a copy.  We have many of the Journal articles available singly and some day will have them all and I do up ones that we don't have upon request - so I can do it for this article from SiS.  The charge is $2.50 by pay pal and it is emailed as a PDF.

 

Kurt

 

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30 minutes ago, Dr PS - Paul Schulze said:

It seems that the carving machines could be easily prefigured or else perhaps they made a big run some time ago and have a big stock.

    According to the manufacturers, they are left thick to protect them from being broken when packaged or shipped.  The stern is also done that way for the same reason.

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Posted (edited)
35 minutes ago, Dr PS - Paul Schulze said:

Is it possible to use chemical aging by applying Metal Black with a Q-tip or brush after the copper is applied?  I would not want to have the glue run or loosen the plates,

    I have heard mentioned on this forum that a mixture of salt and vinegar can be applied and once aged should be sealed with varnish.  (I think it was mentioned in the Syren build log by Dubz.)  Another one that comes to mind is the application of sun tan oil and being placed in direct sunlight.  This one was also sealed with varnish once you get the effect you want.  I think both methods are done once the plates are applied.

Edited by BETAQDAVE
typo

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Posted (edited)
On 7/19/2019 at 3:49 PM, BETAQDAVE said:

    There is also an article on building the Mary Taylor by Clare Hess in the same magazine from the March/April through July/August 2013 issues using a similar method.  

        I looked for other magazine articles on whaling ships after mentioning the ones above and came up with a few more.

             -Model Ship Builder magazine Jan/Feb 1981 issue has an extensive article by Jim Roberts titled Masting And Rigging The                   Whaling Brig Kate Cory.

 

             -Model Ship Builder Mar/Apr 1981 also by Jim Roberts covering hull and deck details for the Kate Cory.

 

             -Ships-In-Scale Jan/Feb 1986 by Robert Evans on modeling try works.  

 

             -S-I-S also Jan/Feb 1886 by Jim Roberts on misc. features of whalers.

 

             -S-I-S Mar/Apr 1986 - May/Jun 1989 by Robert Evans on modeling the whaler Charles W, Morgan.

 

             - S-I-S May/Jun - Sep/Oct 1985 by James Adair also on modeling the C.W.M

 

         And don't forget all the build logs on various whalers in MSWs forums. B)

Edited by BETAQDAVE
typo

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Dave, thanks for the article list. I have not purchased the NRG Model Ship Builder and Ships-in-Scale archives as of yet. Do you know if any of these articles you mentioned contain more information  on building techniques than, say, Chuck’s practicum on the Sultana?

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