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I'm currently working on Artesania Latina's Bluenose II. I apologize if this was covered previously. If so, please direct me to the correct post. I have been running my rat line thru bees wax before attaching to shrouds. I have begun using a bit less of the wax and also running the cord thru my fingers. However, the black cord (in my opinion) just looks waxy and I have been noticing tiny wax particles that need to be cleaned from the ship's deck and other parts. I typically clean everything once the build has been completed. Should I NOT be waxing the ratlines? Should I be using a different type of wax? What do others use to have a more professional appearance?? Any help would be appreciated! Thanks. Ron  

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What mtaylor said. I find wax, even when applied thinned with turpentine and run between the fingers to work it in, is a dust magnet. I'm not just talking about models left out of cases. It's a problem while it's being built. It does serve to "knock the fuzz down," though. Using thinned white glue or shellac may require some running the line under a flame before coating.

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This is just another data point. I cannot refute what has been offered and only add the following. I just took a look at my 1983 built model that is in a case. I used bees wax to coat the lines which were linen. Upon up close inspection with a led flashlight I detect no attraction of dust particles. I will say that I built a temporary case/cover for it while rigging for dust protection. The former residence it was in ( and where it was rigged) had electronic dust control on the furnace and the house dust was minimal. You may want to consider better dust mitigation as it is beneficial beyond ship model rigging. Just a thought.

Joe

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Thank you Joe. I build cases for all my completed ships. I really need to cover my Morgan though as it is just sitting on my work bench not yet finished and has been there for a couple years now. You make a great point. I should be covering the ships to protect them once I start the rigging. Thank you for your thoughts. Much appreciated! Ron 

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I find that a good material for covering models under construction, particularly during the rigging phase, are the thin plastic bags dry cleaners use to cover cleaned clothing when you pick it up. They can be cut on the sides and opened up to a fairly large size and taped together if need be. They cost nothing and are very lightweight, so there's little chance of them damaging the model.

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