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Jeffrey

Yankee Hero by Jeffrey - BlueJacket Shipcrafters

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I was disappointed to see that the kit’s hull is already under-sized at the stern before even getting started in removing any wood.  Is this common?  Can I easily correct this and still get a decent looking finished model? 

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The hull is the same size, and the deck is larger than what is on the plans.  This should be an easy fix.  Feedback?

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Hi, Jeff

This Kit was my first, as well. It was very frustrating to me to try to get the blank to match the hull profiles of the plans ... so much so that more than once the kit wound up in the trash can ( subsequently retrieved). But, with much filler, filing, sanding, more filler, more filing, more sanding, I finally got to what was pretty close to the drawings, and acceptable to me.  I found that hull blanks vary greatly from what you would expect to get based on the drawings (true for several manufacturers), and frequently are not symmetrical side to side or end to end (I even had one where the deck centerline was about 10 degrees off from the keel centerline!). Ultimately I found that building up my own solid hull using layers of Wood cut out based on the kit drawings and sandwiched together with glue gave me a much closer starting point than the kit blank. Since then, I’ve built half a dozen solid hull models, which turned out pretty good. 

 

Here is what I concluded:  Nobody is going to see my model in a museum so it just has to be good enough for me. Symmetry from portside to starboard side is desirable but generally not critical because one almost never sees both sides at one time. And, there is no sin in using a lot of filler, if the hull is to be painted. 

 

Yours looks pretty good. I’d prime the hull before adding the deck, as you may find the priming will highlight a lot of imperfections not noticeable at this stage. I typically have to prime/fill/sand several times before I’m satisfied. 

 

Its unfortunate that these hull blanks are frequently so far off ... I’ll bet that has caused many modelers to trash the whole thing and thus be deprived of the rest of the fun and satisfaction of completing the model. There must be something in the kit manufacturing process that makes good hull blanks too expensive to produce ( hence, the proliferation of plank on bulkhead models). 

 

Keep at it .. you’ve a good start. Will be following. 

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Thanks for the feedback.  It was my intent to prime/fill/sand, but as you suggested I will do this before adding the deck.  I will also cut down the deck to fit the hull, because the hull size matches the plans, and the deck is oversized.  My exact sentiments, good is good enough, and only I will notice.  I need to get past the hull challenge, because I am really looking forward to the topside building and rigging.

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Deck glued onto hull.  Deck did not line up forward into bow post.  Fix this with a bit of wood filler.  Similar with the stern post.  Here I will add a thickness of wood using scrap.  Toe boards will not line up exactly onto the posts, but good enough for a first timer. 

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Actually, just had a thought.  I could add thickness to the bow post to fill in the deck notch.  This might work, then the toe boards would match up on this end anyway.

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Deck is installed and awaiting a little wood putty and finish sanding.  Bow and stern posts still need trimming.  Onward to building the cabin, followed by deck staining before cabin installation.  Will take some time for working stiffs like me.  Enjoying this very much.  Later!

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Cabin is mostly built and temporarily installed so that I can eventually oil the deck and paint the cabin without any hassle.  Now onto minor wood filling and primer, and the next step.  Doing things a bit out of order from the instructions.  Using concepts from plastic model building to reduce painting hassles.

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Completed the cabin.  Moving to water lining the hull and shaping/installing rudder.  I gave up on the enamel paint.  I use solely acrylics for my models, which are far more forgiving, work faster, and less of a hassle.  The mahogany wood was clear coated using a water base semi-gloss by Minwax, the same clear coat that I will use on the deck after staining with a Minwax stain. For painting the hull, I will airbrush Tamiya hull red and deep green.  When using acrylics, I always seal the paint with a clear lacquer spray finish.  For this project I will use a clear matte finish.  

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Deck is stained and the completed cabin is temporarily fitted in place to see how everything looks.  On to the bowsprit, toe rails, and cabin molding.  Looking pretty good I think for a first timer wooden boat modeler.  Many skills and lessons learned gathered in other modeling hobbies definitely transfer to this hobby.

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Permanently installed the cabin.  Installed the deck molding around the cabin.  I've pre-formed and pre-painted the toe rails.  The bowsprit is completed and ready to installed.  Noodling with how to install the toe rail.  I may have to resort to super glue and install in portions while waiting for the glue to dry. I really try to avoid this stuff, but at times it is necessary.  The kit instructions suggests using pins, but from my extensive experience in building wood airplanes, that method will leave pin holes and may split the wood.  Any suggestions out there? 

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Jeffrey, 

I agree with you about the pins. So rarely use them myself. I just cant stand seeing holes. 

Even planking a hull that will eventually be painted, I wont use them.

Unless absolutely necessary, which does pop up once in a while. 

 

I'm a clamp guy. Use them on almost everything. 

From big plastic clamps to small surgical hemostats, cant have enough. 

 

I'm assuming the Toe rail needs to go where the deck edge and side of the hull meet. 

Strategically placed rubber bands work equally as well.

 

Great looking ship, enjoying the build.

 

Tom E  

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Thanks for the feedback.  I will look into the rubber band idea.  I was going to use super glue, but I hate the stuff since there is very little forgiveness in screwing up in the short time it takes to setup.

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Beautiful work!  I agree with you both regarding pins, I agree try rubber bands, perhaps build jig/spacer you can rubber band against?  Always have to problem solve with this hobby, after seeing the hull you started with and where you are at today I know you will do just fine.  

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I'll tell you how I go about attaching toe rails. I don't pre-bend them or paint them before installing. I start by placing the toe-rail stock at the stem. (You'll probably need to cut an angle on the stock so it fits properly.) While holding it in place with one hand, I drill hole, about an inch or so back from the stem through the toe rail and down into the deck. Then I insert a piece of stiff brass rod through the hole. Now, I move aft to the point where the toe rail needs to curve and repeat the above process. I continue doing that until I've gotten all the way to the stern. You don't need wire every inch or so - just at the points where the toe rail needs to curve.

 

Here's a picture of this that I did quickly on some scrap (just pretend it's on the edge of a deck):

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Note that I have NOT used any glue at this point! It's only the wire holding the toe rail in place. Next,  you can carefully raise the toe rail up on the wires. This will give you some space to apply small drops of medium CA.

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Push the toe rail back down on the deck and it will be glued in place. Rather than removing the brass wire, I cut it off as close as I can to the top of the toe rail, then sand it down flush. You can apply a small drop of thin CA right on the brass wire and that will anchor it in place. Once painted, the wire will pretty much be invisible.

 

Hope that helps.

John

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Question:  I am getting close to attaching the rigging blocks to the mast/gaff/boom eyes that I have inserted into the appropriate locations.  Both the rigging blocks and the eyes, each attach together to hold the rigging block, both have closed eyes.  Any suggestions as to how they attach together?

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Installed the mast and started on the rigging.  I seized the forstay I solved the hurdle of the eye bolts.  I did not like what was supplied with the kit for fitting the blocks, so I am using 30 gauge steel wire wound and shaped into an eye-bolt.  Hardly noticeable.  This is my first wood ship model, and I was very reluctant to start one, but after researching I really appreciate the quality of the kits and personal feedback that Nick and the folks folks at Bluejacket provide.  Light at the end of the tunnel.  I anchored the forestay using the seizing technique used by J Brent at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nzDl5MYOgmQ&list=FL-IuytKOPJkBPU7CHxuRS7g&index=4&t=68s

 

 

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Finished!  Not perfect, but good enough for my first attempt at a new kind of modeling.  I noticed the the mast sticks up a bit too far and the decal transfers did not work as well as I had hoped.  I have mixed results with these in the past.  Anyway, not bad at all and I really enjoyed the project.  I would welcome feedback to help improve my skills. 

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Jeffrey: after taking a look at the first picture in your log of the unfinished Hull to your finished ship I think you should be very very proud of your accomplishment!

 

Great work! I look forward to your next project.

 

Regards,

 

Dave

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I have the Revenue Cutter that I would like to start sometime; however, I would really like to tackle the We're Here.  I really like the lines on this boat.  Hoping not take on more than I can handle.  I would really like to have some plank on frame experience, so any suggestions?

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