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G.L.

Day gaff sailing boat with center board by G.L. - scale 1/10 - SMALL

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Yes...a simple vessel like a rowing boat!!!

I have often thought of doing just that and seen some nice longboat kits around just to keep my hand in with the planking.

When I first looked at model long boats, rowing boats and the like, I naively thought " what's the point"?....why don't they make a proper boat?

But it is only when one actually tries to clinker a boat one  quickly realises where the point is!!!!!

Pete

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On 9/22/2019 at 10:26 PM, Jim Lad said:

Beautiful work; she's really looking first class.

 

John

Thank you very much, John.

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The center board case is supported by six metal knees, three at each side.

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The knees must be 2.5 mm thick on the model. I do not have such a thick brass plate, so I will laminate the knees. First I saw some brass strips of 0.8 mm thickness.

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I forgot to make a picture of the first step: First I folded one strip in a right angle, L-shaped with two equal legs. Then I covered the two legs of the angle at both sides with a tinned strip. I try to show it schematically:

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Then I solder the whole knee together by heating it with a gas burner.

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Filing the knees.

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Drilling the nail holes.

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The six knees for the center board case.

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The metal knees stand on wooden floors. Between the keelson and the floor piece there is a small gap for the smooth flow of bilge water.

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Thank you to follow.

Thank you for the likes.

And thank you for the constructive comments.

 

Till next week!

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Part 6. The frames

The frames in the model are 3x3 mm oak frames. To be able to bend them to the hull form I will have to steam them. I use the steam barrel of a wall paper steamer to produce the steam and connect it to a steam box made of plywood.

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Inside of the steam box.

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The frames are laid on the small metal cross bars to allow the steam moving all around the frames.

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I place the steam box outside my workshop because of the escaping vapor.

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I leave the frames for at least 20 minutes in the steam.

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Then I press them gently into the hull. Sometimes one of them creaks but most of them go without problems.

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I use small wooden planks as spacers to glue the frames at equal intervals.

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After a night drying, I take out the frames, sand them and glue them into place.

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The placing of frames takes me several days.

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In the mast step area the frames are laying at half distance intervals.

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Thank you to follow.

Thank you for the likes.

 

Till next week!

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Lovely work Geert, just found the time to visit. I especially like the scale and the proper steam bending of the frames! 

The second method of planking you followed is much more likely to produce accurate results. Could I make a few suggestions from my experience:

 

You can take the pattern of a plank in segments, one third first, then add the second etc, see photo bellow

Use thicker card so that it cannot be bent laterally. The cardboard in the photo is 2 mm (The planks were also 2 mm)

The garboard plank should reach as low at the stem as possible, so the rest of the planks are less cramped and lie more fair. 

The shape of the planks, after the position in the frames is determined, need to somehow be faired. 

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Your hull looks great. What glue did you use for the ribs?

 

Regards Vaddoc

 

 

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On 10/5/2019 at 10:36 AM, Mirabell61 said:

beautiful job on the framing method Geert,

 

a nice light-weight hull, providing plenty of space for further fitting out to the inside of the shell......

 

Nils

I am glad you are liking my work, Nils.

 

On 10/5/2019 at 7:27 PM, mtbediz said:

Excellent build. Very instructive, thank you.

Thank you for your comment, Mustafa.

 

On 10/6/2019 at 3:39 PM, vaddoc said:

Lovely work Geert, just found the time to visit. I especially like the scale and the proper steam bending of the frames! 

The second method of planking you followed is much more likely to produce accurate results. Could I make a few suggestions from my experience:

 

You can take the pattern of a plank in segments, one third first, then add the second etc, see photo bellow

Use thicker card so that it cannot be bent laterally. The cardboard in the photo is 2 mm (The planks were also 2 mm)

The garboard plank should reach as low at the stem as possible, so the rest of the planks are less cramped and lie more fair. 

The shape of the planks, after the position in the frames is determined, need to somehow be faired. 

Your suggestions are very much appreciated, Vaddock. I am an enthousiast follower of your 5-tonner log. Exceptional job you do there.

As a matter of fact, Pete (Peter Cane) drew my attention to the planking tutorials on the HGR site. This week I spent some time on experimenting with the method that Tony (Tkay11) used also for his chaloupe armée. This method prescribes tu use planks with only one tapered side and one straight side instead of fully lofted out planks. For my try-out I remake the work boat of my smack cross section, this time in a 1/10 scale. I build it on a spruce block model mold. DSC00439.thumb.JPG.34b501a48f89e8263d9d112997347aa6.JPG

I am not convinced that it is really the method that I am searching for:2019-10-12_094048.JPG.89e37fe8d43b36bf299ff228604103f3.JPG

To make this answer I prematurely scraped an sanded a part of the hull to see what I still can make of this hull. Against my expectation the result is not as dramatic as I feared. Here some pictures. Port side is partly sanded, more sanding will still be needed. The pinholes in the strakes are filled by gluing a wood splinter  in it.DSC00504.thumb.JPG.f88bd15fd8bbbffdc1edb949b26f615e.JPGDSC00505.thumb.JPG.06602d41ef098ea8fc2fc7f3f88dfa62.JPG

I will finish this hull. I am curious  how it will look inside. Probably I will remake it another time, this time with lofted strakes and with templates in segments like you suggest. Maybe I should start a log of it on the forum.

On 10/6/2019 at 3:39 PM, vaddoc said:

 What glue did you use for the ribs?

 

I use ordinary white wood glue. To apply it I often use a syringe.DSC00500.thumb.JPG.c45b2f4cfa0a5dbf4073ff1847966b68.JPG

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Part 7. Finishing the hull

7.1. Breast hook, gunwales and rub rails

When all the frames are in place I shorten them all for 5mm to make space for the gunwale.

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Taking over the shape of the bow on tracing paper to make a sawing template for the breast hook.

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Sawing and fitting the breast hook.

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The gunwale is made of a 5x5mm oak bar.
Fitting the starboard gunwale.

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Gluing gunwales and breast hook.

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Without clamps

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I plane 2 mahogany planks to a thickness of 2mm.to make the rub rails.

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The two rub rails shaped...

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... and glued

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The rub rails:

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Thank you to follow.

Thank you for the likes.

And thank you for the constructive comments.

 

Till next week!

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Looks very nice Geert!

 

Going back to the planking:

 

I think that you might get away without spilling in 1:62 scale or similar but not in 1:10, especially with 3 mm thick planks. 

 

I think a guide to how the planks should be is that when looking the planks from the side, they should look almost horizontal

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In the Deben, the gardboard and the planks close to it where very curved upwards. The planks in the middle were straight (-ish). The planks near the sheer were quite curved the other way. All of the planks however, when put in place appeared almost horizontal. When defining their position in the frames, I used a 3 x 3 mm pear strip to make sure they were fair.

 

So in your boat, maybe it could be something like this (Sorry for the patches in the  picture)

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Considering the curved plank will need to come out of a straight one, and that trees have a given width, this tells you how wide the planks could be in the real boat and how many planks need to be on each side. Very curved planks need to be quite narrow otherwise they would need to come out of massive pieces of timber

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By changing the shape of the gardboard in the middle and aft at the sternpost and also changing how far up the stem it will end, you can change the shape of all the other planks.

 

1:10 is a great scale, you can use 1 mm screws to hold the planks in place and then fill the holes with tree nails.. Another thing, for 3 mm planks you would need to shape their edges a bit so they can sit closer when the hull has a significant curve.

 

Apologies for the long post, hope I did not hijack your log! Your hull looks great so your method in the end worked just fine

 

Vaddoc

Edited by vaddoc

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Thank you very much for this explanation, Vaddoc.

I will finish this hull as it is , but I will redo it (the mold is made anyway) following your advices and will let you know how it worked. It will take some time because since August I started a new POF project and I am now sorting the pictures to start the log within a couple of weeks.

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On 10/14/2019 at 5:50 AM, michael mott said:

The model is looking great, Nice work on the ribs.

 

Michael

 

10 hours ago, KeithAug said:

A very nice model particularly when considering how difficult oak is to work with at small scale. Well done.

Thank you very much for your comments Michael and Keith. As a follower of the work of you both I consider them as big complements.

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Part 8. The inside of the boat

8.1. Grating for the fore castle

The boat has a small forecastle. For its realization, the tutorial suggests some options: a closed deck or a grating. For the grating it gives two examples. If I was building a full scale sailing boat I would chose for a closed deck to have at least one dry spot on board to place the picnic basket but as I am building a static boat model, I chose for a grating because it looks more stylish. I will try to make a grating like in the left example.

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I start with making a paper design.

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I make a photocopy of my design and trace the frame of my grating on the back side.

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I glue three pieces of mahogany wood along the inner shape of the frame.

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With the copy of the design on the other side, it is now easy to saw and sand the outer contours of the frame.

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I use a bench vice as guide to saw out the notches in the inner side accurately. Poor photography, but it shows what I mean (I will have to follow a photography course at Gaetan Bordeleau😉).

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Sawing the cross slats ...

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... and gluing them into the frame.

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The grating:

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The carrying beams for the grating are laying on two short risings. Gluing them in. The temporally plank above each rising keeps it at the correct distance from the gunwale.

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Gluing the beams.

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Grating placed.

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Edited by G.L.

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8.2. The mooring bit

I take an oak stock of 1x1 cm to make the mooring bit.

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I first saw the fixing pin at the bottom of the bit.

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Fitting the bit in the hull.

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Shaping the top of the bit. The grating has to fit in the slot at the front of the bit.

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Shaping the bit with the Dremel.

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The mooring bit has a horizontal brass pin just below the top. Fitting the finished mooring bet.

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Thank you to follow.

Thank you for the likes.

And thank you for the constructive comments.

 

Till next week!

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This boat is coming along great G.L.  Good idea using a wallpaper steamer for the steam box.  The framing and grating turned out sweet - very nice.  And I enjoy the detailed description of your work process - thanks.

 

Gary

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On 10/19/2019 at 7:44 PM, vaddoc said:

Very nice Geert! Your boat has a wooden loveliness, a pleasure to follow!

 

On 10/19/2019 at 7:54 PM, KeithAug said:

The grating turned out very well - well done.

Thank you very much for the appreciation, Vaddoc and Keith

 

On 10/19/2019 at 8:37 PM, andante said:

Simply beautiful. I love that scale.

I like to work at large scales (1/25 and below). It goes better together with my thick short fingers to make things and it is easier for me to look to sturdy ship models.

On 10/24/2019 at 6:22 AM, FriedClams said:

This boat is coming along great G.L.  Good idea using a wallpaper steamer for the steam box.  The framing and grating turned out sweet - very nice.  And I enjoy the detailed description of your work process - thanks.

 

Gary

Thanks Gary, I learn a lot from the way you describe your build of the New England Stonington Dragger.

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8.5. The bottom boards

I make also a paper template to determine the shape of the bottom boards.

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Gluing the bottom boards together.

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And sawing them into shape.

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Drilling holes for tree nails. The attentive viewer will see that I added a plank at both sides of the board. When I fitted the board, it was much too narrow. There was plenty of room to add a plank.

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Placing bamboo tree nails.

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The central bottom board.

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The three bottom boards

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The central bottom board is secured with a bracket and a wedge.

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I place now also the knees of the center board case.

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While working at the center board case and studying the plan, I discovered that something was wrong with the center board. Two thwarts will be laying on the center board. It is hardly visible on the plan, therefore I colored the forward thwart red on the picture below. In hauled up position the arm of the center board must be high enough to give space for the thwart. Mine does not (see inset: the board is even not yet fully hauled up and there is no place for the thwart).

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I have to make a new, adapted center board. I make first a card board mock up to try it in both hauled up and lowered position. On the first picture you see the original center board to the left.

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Now I make it in aluminum. The new one to the left, the old one to the right.

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The new center board in hauled up position. Now there is place for the thwart.

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The boat as it is now.

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Thank you to follow.

Thank you for the likes.

And thank you for the constructive comments.

 

Till next week!

Edited by G.L.

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There's some very nice work going on there and I'm really enjoying the difference between your traditional type of boat and my modern glued lapstrake design.

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