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Discussions about chapter two - External hull planking for Winchelsea


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  • 3 weeks later...

Hi Chuck,

Will you be adding the billets of cedar for planking to your store? I’d like to purchase everything including the wood needed for milling once you have the starter packs available again...ship it all at once.

Thanks,

JJ

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  • 4 weeks later...

I took a stab at making some videos that show how I plank the bow of any ship model.  Specifically how to taper and edge bend a strip so that it lays flat against the bulkheads.   This is basically how I plank every hull at the bow.  I shot these videos at 720 HD quality so rather than string together the four videos into one long 20 minute session, I kept them individual.   They take forever to upload to you tube when they are 20 minutes long.   Literally hours.  So these are four short 5 minute videos instead. A lot easier to upload and process.   I will edit this post and add the other 3 as I finish processing them for upload.  Basically each part is split into an intro.....then tapering.....then edge bending.....and test fitting on the hull.

 

Let me know if you have any questions.   Keep in mind its weird making these when I am alone in my shop and basically talking to myself.  I had to reach around the tripod i order to get to the model and I was hitting it and had to start over many times....not my cup of tea all this video stuff!!!!  😂  Let me know if you think its worth the time as it is a real pain in the biscuit .  But I will continue if you guys get anything out of it.  I also must have had the camera too close to teh hull so the first two videos are not as crisp as the others.   Live and learn.....next time it will be better  but I tried to get as close to the hull as possible so you could see everything.

 

Planking the bow of HMS Winchelsea....part one - Intro to tapering

 

 

PART TWO.....Tapering your plank...

 

 

PART THREE....Edge bending with heat

 

 

 

PART FOUR.....Testing the plank on the model

 

 

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both.   I will use a metal straight edge and a sharp #11 blade to cut most of it off close to my line.  Do this with several passes of the blade. Dont try and cut th excess off in one pass.

 

Then I sand the remaining bit off to my line carefully with a sanding stick or emory board.  I use one of those wide nail files.  They are 180 grit on one side and 100 grit on the other.  

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2 hours ago, Chuck said:

both.   I will use a metal straight edge and a sharp #11 blade to cut most of it off close to my line.  Do this with several passes of the blade. Dont try and cut th excess off in one pass.

 

Then I sand the remaining bit off to my line carefully with a sanding stick or emory board.  I use one of those wide nail files.  They are 180 grit on one side and 100 grit on the other.  

Thank you.

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For me, these are amazingly well timed and helpful videos.  Thank you.  I'm right at the point of lining off my bulkheads and then continue with the tape method you describe in the articles database to measure and cut the planking strips.  The method shown on the video is so much easier.  My model is a Dragon sailboat and the hull shape is very different than the Winnie, but as you say, this method should work for just about any hull shape.  I post my results in the build log.

 

Thanks again,

Jim 

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Great videos Chuck! They may have been a pain to produce but they are absolute gold. Thank you for taking the time to do this for the community - I know that many, many people will benefit from this demonstration. If a picture tells a thousand words, then how much does a video tell? Well done, Sir!

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I havent finished chapter two yet.....but soon.   Nobody is that far in the project yet anyway.   Remember that chapter two is planking the outboard hull.   I am not even finished doing that yet.  So for now,  folks will need to use my log which is very detailed.   It has all teh info needed which will basically be copied into the actual chapter.

 

Lou its OK......because you can still buy them from me until that times comes.  LOL...:D

 

Chuck

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Lou....It was giving me a heart attack....literally, way too much stress and labor with zero benefit.   Only about a dozen or so people bought them.   You know, those few guys hung up on only building in 100% pear.  It wasnt worth it.  I couldnt justify buying so much pearwood to keep around the shop and have two kinds of blocks in stock.  It takes too long to make them.   24 sizes and configurations of pear blocks..(1000's of pear blocks takes time and then they just sit there)...those few people were really asking a lot when they wanted me to keep making them.   Some havent stopped holding a grudge about it either.  They didnt care that I had to spend $1000 to buy a slab of pearwood that half was bad and thrown away,   then I had to pay to have it milled,   then I had make 24 variations so a few people could buy $50 worth of blocks every two years.

 

As far as the special runs and custom jobs.... What I have learned over the last six years doing this is that those guys who ask for special orders and custom jobs with special wood.  The ones that want you spend hours and $$$$ doing something on the side....those guys dont buy much in the end, if much at all.  You know the guys.....everything asked for is preceded with "this shouldnt be too hard or take long for you to do".   They spend peanuts yet they do the most asking and the most moaning.   So for piece of mind and less stress I just stopped making the stuff and consolidated my inventory for the other 97%  of my customers.  Because they would literally spend $25 bucks a year and thought they were doing me the favor.   It was just getting ridiculous and I was close to having a heart attack.

 

Mix it up a bit and use the boxwood blocks.   They also stain beautifully so it really doesnt matter.   To really take your model to the next level....try dyeing them black or dark brown as David Antscherl does.  You should have a look at his rigging on Comet or Resolution.  Beautiful stuff.

 

Chuck

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On 9/21/2019 at 10:54 AM, Chuck said:

I havent finished chapter two yet.....but soon.   Nobody is that far in the project yet anyway.   Remember that chapter two is planking the outboard hull.   I am not even finished doing that yet.  So for now,  folks will need to use my log which is very detailed.   It has all teh info needed which will basically be copied into the actual chapter.

 

Lou its OK......because you can still buy them from me until that times comes.  LOL...:D

 

Chuck

Chuck: Thanks... I did notice you had the tick strips in the download section for chapter 2. Saw your videos on tapering the planks on the bow.. You made a onerous process for me a lot easier.. thanks... I did a less streamlined version of what you did (I soaked the wood) but I did have lots of problems in wood shrinkage and the wood getting "furry". 

 

I do have one question for you as well as the group build members and I apologize ahead of time if I missed something. I notice the plans for the project are at 1/4 scale and the wood products are at 1/4 scale but I notice a lot of the build logs are at 1/48 scale. I do admit I haven't read every group members log, I am curious in the interest at 1/48 vs 1/4 scale (either than the sheer size of the model?) Any information would be great.

 

Thanks again Chuck for this project. Its got me keen on starting something different and new as well as me renewed impetus to get my present Agamemnon project completed.

 

Mike Draper

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They are the same thing....its just another to way to say 1/4" scale.  It should really read 1:48 whenever anyone uses that terminology but they sometime type it wrong.  1/4" and 1:48 are the same size........same scale

 

It like 3/16" scale is the same as 1:64.  Its just another way say the same thing.  Its all the same size.

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1 hour ago, Chuck said:

They are the same thing....its just another to way to say 1/4" scale.  It should really read 1:48 whenever anyone uses that terminology but they sometime type it wrong.  1/4" and 1:48 are the same size........same scale

 

It like 3/16" scale is the same as 1:64.  Its just another way say the same thing.  Its all the same size.

Chuck: Thanks.. I was figuring that but I was wondering if I was missing something. 

 

Appreciate the quick response

 

Mike Draper

 

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On this model at 1/4” scale the planks are much wider.  Therefore they need more heat in my opinion.  In addition,  the hair dryer will work but it will take a lot longer to heat up the plank enough.  I think mike is using a hair dryer and its fine.  

 

The method of heat delivery isnt as important as the overall concept.  But i do find that the iron works quicker and is more effective.

 

i am still using a hair dryer elsewhere when a plank needs to be bent the other way or twisted.  For example at the stern where the planks bend and twist into the tuck of the counter.  So i am really using both.  Different tools for different situations that work best for that type of bending.

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