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Excellent booklet! One of best I had seen on the subject.  And most important I comes fee of charge and without copyright demands. 

Edited by Y.T.

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Thanks a lot for the excellent and detailed description. Also thanks for ensuring that eyeballing is a proper method.

Clark

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11 hours ago, Clark said:

Thanks a lot for the excellent and detailed description. Also thanks for ensuring that eyeballing is a proper method.

Clark

Hi Clark, Oh yes I am a great one for just "eyeballing". If it looks right it must be somewhere near right.

Regards

Allan

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7 hours ago, alpayed said:

Hi Clark, Oh yes I am a great one for just "eyeballing". If it looks right it must be somewhere near right.

Regards

Allan

Within all the discussions about CAD and precision modelling, I felt a bit old fashioned when trusting the eyes.

Clark

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26 minutes ago, Clark said:

Within all the discussions about CAD and precision modelling, I felt a bit old fashioned when trusting the eyes.

I feel the same way when I am reading about CAD, but when I am at my workbench with a piece of wood I use what I have and am satisfied. 

 

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4 hours ago, Clark said:

Within all the discussions about CAD and precision modelling, I felt a bit old fashioned when trusting the eyes.

Clark

I spent most of my working career designing machines etc and in latter years all on CAD.

I don't make models to do that. I can understand why people get excited about 3D printing something they have modeled in CAD.

I spent so long doing that the interest has waned. I would much rather wind up rope.

I built a rope walk to make the rope for my models. This type of thing is what I enjoy and eyeballing sizes etc is all part of it.

However I get huge satisfaction from building an item from scratch with raw materials, basic tools, my hands and eyeballing.

Although I don't mind kits and kit bashing I throw out any component that is not up to scratch and make it myself.

If the part is good and I know I could make it myself, why bother, just use it.

Here is a pic of "Lightning's" rigging with some of that rope walks product.

Also a CAD drawing of Chapman's Lobster Howker I did in 1985.

The drawings and the CAD modeling is only a means to an end for me.

 

Regards

Allan

IMG_5546.JPG

Lobster_hoy.jpg

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I'm going to move this topic and pin it in the planking area.  I will get more visibility.   

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Thank you for sharing, I just downloaded it to my various other digital "Ship Books", as the folder on my computer is called. I'll be reading through it in the days and weeks to come as I begin my second build.

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1 hour ago, mtaylor said:

I'm going to move this topic and pin it in the planking area.  I will get more visibility. 

No problems Matt.

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Thanks for this, alpayed!  I just had a quick look and definitely a big help for a complete novice like me.  I haven't built anything yet as I am trying to get as much information I can before building a ship.  This might be a bit off topic, how did you get that kind of colour on the ship on your first page.  Is that just varnish?  Will the colour/type of paint part of the instruction?

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Hi Jag. The model is just coated with polyurethane. (varnish) No colours have been used.

The planking is New Zealand Kauri. Wales are heartwood Nectarine.

Deck planking is Australian Murray pine.

Model is of HMS Supply.

The document was originally written for plans of HMS Supply

 

Regards

Allan.

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aaP8052886.JPG

supply002.jpg

supply001.jpg

supply003.jpg

supply004.jpg

supply005.jpg

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