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Ilhan Gokcay

Question about paddle box and sponson of Paddle steamer ferry

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Posted (edited)
Hello again,
 

I'm still working on the drawing of my PS. Altough I have/collected much of information I came again to a dubious point and ask for opinions.
I marked the positions of the sponsons with red on the side view plan, I think there should be also a sponson where I marked with green as this is where the paddle box sits. I'm not sure if it is true what I think. Should there be a sponson or otherwise how is it constructed.
I have also a cross section drawing where there is no support shown for the sponson. I'm not sure if there are supports for all of the sponsons or not.
And if the other shorter sponsons are like the one on this cross section drawing.

Thanks in advance

Ilhan

Spns-1.jpg

Spns-2.jpg

Edited by Ilhan Gokcay

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Posted (edited)

Side wheelers often had iron stays that ran from the outer ends of the paddle beams to the ship’s hull, where they bolted to one of the ship’s frames. These are not supports to keep the paddle decks from sagging. The paddle beams are strong enough to support the decks.  The stays are intended to distribute the stress of water impacting the underside of the paddle deck from waves or from the sea surface as the ship heels.   

 

No stays are needed under the forward and aft ends of the paddle boxes because water can flow into the paddle box rather than slamming into the underside of a deck. So there wouldn’t be stays at the locations that you’ve marked in green. 

 

Vince McCullough

Edited by VinceMcCullough

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Hey Vince thanks for the info.
I believed that the stays (I call them "support") are to support the beams (I call them "sponson") and the paddle box. Interesting. 

So there are beams with no stays where I marked red as the one shown on the cross section plan.
Then next to these beams there are stays very close to them. Do these stays end simply at the outer edge or are there again beams to hold these stays and also support the paddle box deck.

 

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Posted (edited)

This gets a little difficult to describe, but here goes ...

 

The weight of the paddle box itself is carried by three beans: two “paddle beams” that run athwartship, and a “spring beam” that connects the outer ends of the paddle beams. The paddle beams sit under the forward and aft ends of the paddle box and the spring beam sits under the outer “face” of the box. 

 

The paddle decks, sometimes called wing decks, are forward and aft of the box, and are usually triangular in shape.  Like the paddle box, the paddle decks are supported by a series of atwartship beams. A fender beam mounted on the end of these beams forms the outer edge of the paddle decks. The fender beams join into the spring beam by scarf joints, producing a smooth transition from the fender to the spring beam. 

 

The paddle decks were often perforated using either gratings or perforated steel plate. This allowed water to drain from the decks and, more importantly, to go UP through the perforations when the ship was struck by a wave or heeled enough to submerge the paddle deck.

 

The stays aided in supporting the decks against the impact of the water.  Without them the paddle decks could be torn off by the force of water trapped under the falling paddle decks.

 

BTW, I learned most of this while researching and developing plans for a civil war blockade robber. The plans will be included with a book that will be published in the near future.

Edited by VinceMcCullough

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Vince, I appreciate very much your detailed explanation.
I see I'm going the same road as you, I'm also researching and develeoping plans of a British built Turkish paddle steamer ferry for Bhosporus/Istanbul.
I have a couple of books about steam ships but not much info about the construction of a paddle box and beams etc. (And also usually photos and drawings from Internet.)
That's why I keep asking questions.
But it is getting clearer. My last question would be about the beams of the paddle decks. I assume that their positions are where the stays are.
But they  are not like the two main atwartship beams of the paddle box (like the one on the cross section drawing), aren't they.
Can they be simple I beams or angles ? 

Attached some views of my plan.

Regards

Hale-1-05-Scale(1-50)-1-Gemi-15-Spnsn1_resize.jpg

Hale-1-05-Scale(1-50)-1-Gemi-15-Spnsn2_resize.jpg

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Ilhan

 

The deck beams could be either angles or I-beams, but I would bet on I -beams. The blockade runner I’m working on used I-beams constructed of steel plate sandwiched between a pair of angles on the top and bottom.

 

Your plans look great, and it looks like a sweet little steamer. Are you using a CAD program or drawing by hand?

 

Vince

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Thanks Vince, I will share the plans when they are ready.
I use a CAD program (2D) for drawing. It's QCad (https://www.qcad.org/en/) easy to use(and learn) and effective. It's also not expensive.
For the line plan I used "DelftShip" and transferred the file(dxf output) to QCAd. The free version of "DelftShip" is sufficient for my purpose.

She is built by Fairfield Shipbuilding Company, Glasgow in 1903, 52m long ferry. 


 

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Ilhan

 

Ive also been using a CAD program, Cadopia, to draw the plans for the blockade runner. I’ve never used Delftship. I’ll have to give it a try.

 

I took a look at your your Flikr albums. That’s quite a body of work! I was also impressed with your work area. It’s much neater than mine!

 

Vince

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