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Justin P.

HMS Bounty Launch by Justin P. - Model Shipways

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Posted (edited)

Hi All (Again)

 

First let me say that this is probably the third build-log Ive started since joining NRG and MSW back in 2014.   Some of those early builds are still with me, and one in particular Ive tried twice and which went so irrecoverably badly that Ive tried to forget the whole affair and have since stuffed in a "box of shame."   Much of my early failure (to complete) has had a lot to do with over-ambitious kits and a level of perfectionism that Ive found somewhat debilitating at certain steps.   Also, Ive found that learning this stuff is very difficult in a vacuum, and with little to know organized groups in my area its hard to find more seasoned modelers to learn from.  Also, when things start looking really bad (to me) I find it somewhat difficult to carry on.   Mostly, however, my forward progress has been difficult due to having small kids, a full-time job, a long commute and an ever repopulating "honey do list" and other assorted house-ownership projects.  My interest has remained steadfast though, and my kits never fully stored away.  I think this was an intentional thing, as I just couldn't bear the idea of walking away. 

 

All that said...   here we go again.   Ive bought quite a few kits and read about a thousand build-logs and feel (finally) that this kit might be the perfect level of beginner that I won't find it too challenging but also not so easy that Im just bored.   Ive been blow away reading the logs of others and really want to joint the ranks of having "completed" a build.   Ive had a pretty good start, and I think Im ready to start my log.  

 

Unfortunately I had earlier decided NOT to log this build as I'd failed to move forward with my others and I was worried the same thing would happen with this one, but as Ive moved ahead pretty well and found a window in my schedule  I think I can actually do this.  For this reason my early photos were never taken...   

 

As for my goal, myinterest is not so much in the Bounty (1784) launch as it is in the Discovery (1789) launch.    As some may be aware, the Puget Sound was named for Peter Puget, 3rd Lieutentant of Discovery during Vancouver's survey of the Pacific Coast.   Being originally from the area and currently living and working here my interest in this particular boat is deep.   Puget surveyed much of the lower Sound from a Launch not unlike that of Bounty's and many (including the Center for Wooden Boats) have built their versions of the Puget "Longboat" on the designs of the Bounty's "Launch."   Ive yet to determine why Bounty's is a "Launch" and why Discovery's is a "Longboat."    In either case, it seems the McKay plans and the other original Bounty launch plans Ive seen are much more accurately represented by the MS kit than the clinker built "Puget Longboat" that is claimed to be based on the Bounty launch.   (See Here).  

 

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Im not sure how the builders of that replica decided that the transom should be so different or that it ought to be clinker when the original plans are so obvious.   But there it is.    I referenced the plans I saw at Cap'n Rat Finks build here and I think posted in other builds elsewhere.   I don't recall reading anywhere that the Bounty's launch was a clinker built boat.  

 

In either case, my build here won't deviate from the MS plans aside from paint/finish and a couple details that others have somewhat universally adopted (transom finish and installing cherry frames as a single piece).   

 

Thanks for reading. 

 

I started as many others have in reading the entire manual first, which I wholly recommend and reading many build logs (in some cases, repeatedly) which I think may be even more valuable.   I counted, cleaned and attached the sheer tabs as prescribed.   

 

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After squaring and installing the bulkheads I then installed the bulkhead reinforcements.   I then faired the hull as best I could.   A point I'll make here is that my fairing went extremely well as did the cleaning, sanding and construction of the keel. I realized in my past projects that part of my problem with fairing is that I was paying too much mind to the goal of a step, and not so much to the description.  For example...   instructions may say something vague like "Fair the hull with a sanding stick..."   and in many logs you may see nicely faired hulls and a sanding stick in the background.   One may think, I just need to sand the hull into shape...   no big deal.   How wrong I was.   The key part I missed was the "sanding stick."    Sanding blocks, or sponges or a piece of paper in your hand will not work as well or at all when compared to a long, flat and hard plane upon which the sanding paper is attached.   Foam or cushion of any kind will result in a slightly rounded edge and ultimately an unseemly wide joint between two pieces.   This took me too long to realize.  Fairing went extremely well when I used a 5-6" long, .5" square dowel.   No unsightly seems, and a pleasant experience overall. 

 

I will endeavor to weigh all points of instruction with equal gravity.  It is not so much the goal as it is the way you achieve it. 

 

Since fairing Ive laid some spare balsa battens to check the hull and at this point am pleased.   I am almost certain I removed too much material, but am trying very hard not to over think this and let my worry of making a mistake keep me from moving forward.   Something tells me there is quite a lot of maneuvering as you go that may not often be obvious to beginners.   So...   if I have indeed removed too much material I shall deal with the planking issue when it arises.   My new motto, a badly built model is still better than a half finished hulk on a garage shelf.   

 

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Ive also decided to go with a painted/stained hull as others have done.   So Ive managed to come up with a weathered look that I like.  Using 1:1 Driftwood / Special Walnut Miniwax, applied after a pre-stain and all applied separately.  I've been able to get a nice color that I like.   I wanted the keel a bit darker than the planking so Ill likely change this ratio up as I move forward.   Unfortunately the photos make it look a lot richer/redder/darker than it really is.   

 

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Ive got to carve the rabbet and get the transom sorted out this weekend.   As well Ill be attempting to steam bend a few frames after a good soak.   Looking forward to it.  

 

Thanks all. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Justin P.

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Posted (edited)

G'day maturin,

 

I have almost finished my Bounty launch and need to get off my butt and do a retrospective build log ;)

 

I've been doing other things recently so this reply may be a little disjointed.

First off, you probably haven't faired the frames enough. You need to go beyond what is suggested or you will finish up with a gap to fill.

 

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This was after I faired both the frames and the cherry ribs.

 

Second, the laser cut planks have bevelled edges (from the laser cutting), this works for you on one side of the hull but against you on the other. You need to re-bevel the bad side so there are no gaps both inside and outside the hull then do the planks for the good side so they match the widths of the other side. All without taking off too much to help prevent the gap above.

 

Third Transom, @#$@#$&%^$#$^% laser etched label.  Anyway I chose to fully support the transom and it worked well.

 

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The ply on the back gives a small lip to hold the transom, about 1mm.

 

Fourth, I finished up boiling the cherry ribs for 15 minutes and fitting them as 1 piece as my judging the middle of the keel wasn't great and some ribs kept popping out when I tried separate port and starboard ribs.

That also worked out as I kept the first set for the intermediate ribs. One or two of the ribs still cracked but I just stuck a clamp on them to force the crack closed them superglued them later when they dried.

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Lastly (for the moment) there is a large copy of 'The Bountys Launch' plans for download at our state library here it's a little bit trapezoidal, you need to stretch both top corners out a little in some graphics software.

 

 

 

 

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Edited by iMustBeCrazy
Fixed images

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Posted (edited)

This is great stuff...   I had a moment of panic last night as I was peering over my fairing job and still wondered if I hadn't taken too much off.   Though as you say, it may be that Ive yet to take ENOUGH off.  Its hard to say.   Ill look for the bevels as I begin planking.   For now, Im just fitting and testing the keel and thinking about the process of bending the frames.   I think Im somewhere between soaking in boiling water at the outset but leaving to soak over 24 hrs and then using heat applied with a tool as I bend them in one piece.   

 

Perhaps these photos will help the experienced eye judge wether my fairing is adequate to continue. 

 

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IMG_0052.jpeg

 

NOTE:  I also realize Ill need to continue the fairing down past the sheer tabs to prohibit any problems with the ribs.   Thankfully, looking at my photos as I wrote this reminded me. 

Edited by maturin

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5 hours ago, maturin said:

Though as you say, it may be that Ive yet to take ENOUGH off.

The first thing to understand is that this is a model which might resemble the Bounty's launch (by the way, the term launch later became longboat) and despite the implied connection to the drawing I linked to above it's not the same.

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So don't panic about taking too much off, nobody really knows what the launch looked like. (original in grey model in green) Look how high he has the thwarts, the crew must have had really long legs.

 

Don't forget you have to fair the transom. This is one of the reasons I glued the jig to a board.

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Taking more off will also help with the plank lengths

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Oh, it was the port planks that fitted better.

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Again, you need to bend 2 sets of ribs.

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My fairing stick, some 1/8" ply with the outer layers cut cross grain. Flexible enough but not too much. Push-pull with the handle while using three fingers of the other hand to curve it over the frames.

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Remember, frames 1-3 are faired separately as the don't have ribs during planking (but still bend some). Be careful if you mark/highlight frames 1-3 as suggested as it might stain the planks.

 

 

 

 

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This was my first wooden boat/ship kit and it's great for learning. Large enough scale to not be too fiddly and simple enough construction to learn without getting overwhelmed. Seems like you're off to a good start.

 

When you're bending thin frames like this, it helps to look at the grain of each piece. Some may have a clear weak point or knot that will make them extra likely to fracture if you place the stress in the wrong place or direction. Noticing these places and rotating the frame 90° to keep the bend from following the grain can be enough to save it, or you can move its location so that such a weak place doesn't fall on the maximum curve.

 

I just went back and checked my log, where I wrote that 5 minutes in boiling water worked great in combination with a planking iron.

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Also, do not just grab the end of the rib and bend as it will bend and probably fail at the weakest point.

 

Start with say your middle finger pressing the rib against the frame at the keel then use your index finger to press the next bit down. Slowly Cautiously work down along the rib using your other hand to hold it as you move your fingers until you can place your first clamp below the sheer tab. Then go back and place your other clamps. I found the smallest bulldog clips worked best here. Remember to clamp the rib against the faired angle, not square to the frame. You may have to 'tilt' the clamp to achieve this. After they cooled/dried I glued the bottom below the sheer tab and faired the ribs, gently. Use clamps to hold the ribs on the frames next to the areas you are sanding.

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Posted (edited)

Thanks all for the great advice and feedback.  Particularly Cathead's words about this being a great beginner kit, which confirms my own feeling that earlier failures were a lot to do with inexperience and poor kit choice.   

 

Since my last post, I had a productive weekend.  I went ahead and just looked over my situation still a bit worried that I had removed too much material during the fairing process but also noticed I did not line the last three aft bulkheads with the bottom of the building jig, but with joinery at the center (duh!).   This resulted in those last three sitting far too low.   Looking at the building jig with the keel attached I could see some pretty obvious issues with more than half of my bulkheads no longer meeting the appropriate plane along the rabbet.   Had a moved forward and attached the ribs, they wouldn't have meet properly.   The below images should illustrates what I mean...

 

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The above image illustrates how low the aft bulkheads ended up.    I pulled those off, rather successfully without breakage, and refit them. 

 

After going over several rather desperate options, I decided to back fill a bit and re-fair these areas.   Taking some thin stock I glued it down and brought the bulkheads back up to their intended heights onto the upended building jig, in some areas requiring two layers: 

 

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After being satisfied with this fix-up I then turned my attention to the transom, which has been much maligned.   I took some thin veneer, cut to an average width of the hull planks and glued them on and stained to match the keel: 

 

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After fitting the transom and the keel and bit of very minor re-fairing I started in on the frame bending.   I took the above advice in parts and wound up carefully selecting 15, 10" lengths that seemed the most uniform without knots or other obvious weak points.   I boiled these for 15 minutes and applied them in one piece starting at the keel and working my down the each side separately.   I did not glue them until after they had moderatly dried, simply applying a small bit of glue above the sheer tabs.  I noticed that giving them a minor bend in two directions revealed the grain pretty readily as they obviously seemed more interested in bending in one direction over the other.  I only ended up with three for the boneyard.  Im leaving them over night to dry as I write this:

 

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A again with the keel replaced and glued over the frames.   The alignment of the frames to the rabbet is really nice now and Im pleased with how everything turned out.   The net effect on the net few steps (planking) is yet to be seen, Im sure there will be some.   Though I think I can manage those issues when they come.  

 

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Edited by maturin

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37 minutes ago, maturin said:

I'm pleased with how everything turned out.

Well done!

 

Don't forget to fair the ribs a bit.

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When glueing I used a syringe, it gave me nice control.

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One of the others used used an off-cut from where the stem was cut out to support/restrain the planks at the stem. If I were to do it again I would probably use two pieces of plastic cut to shape and clamped to the stem so I could work on both sides without moving anything. It was a bit fiddly just using a clip.

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You may have to reshape planks as you go, I think this one was to allow the next plank to reach the transom.

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Posted (edited)

Thanks Crazy.   The note about fairing the frames is well taken.  Though as I went back out to the shop last night I started wondering if I don't need to replace a couple as they seem to have taken on a rather interesting twist as they've dried.  The frames are largely bent and set against the angle of the faired bulkheads so I were not completely square at the bow and stern anyhow, but in the below pictures there seems to be a degree of twist that I didn't impart during the bending process.  

 

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You should be able to see how much they curl towards the bow in the above photos, and I admit that the curl is in the direction and along the intended curve of the planking but this seems a bit extreme.  Below shows how they curl away from the faired edge of the bulkheads:

 

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The question is, should I just gently fair the ribs and not worry about it so much?   Or should I go ahead and pull the offending frames and bend/install new ones?   Im now starting to worry that I may have glued my keel in too early...   the idea of pulling and replacing three to four frames now that they're glued into the keel stresses me out, especially when considering that all the rest are in place and darn near as perfect as I could expect I would achieve.  Ugh.

IMG_0080.jpeg

Edited by maturin

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How set are they in that twist? If you were to lay and clamp a few planks against those twisted ribs, would they straighten sufficiently? The two support each other, and it's possible they'll work together as you assemble the actual hull. Also, as the twisting all seems to be far from the keel, you could consider rewetting the twisted ribs locally (like with a small piece of damp cloth) and seeing if you can reset them with a plank iron and more clamps. There's no important glue nearby that the water would affect.

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Posted (edited)
35 minutes ago, Cathead said:

How set are they in that twist? If you were to lay and clamp a few planks against those twisted ribs, would they straighten sufficiently? The two support each other, and it's possible they'll work together as you assemble the actual hull. Also, as the twisting all seems to be far from the keel, you could consider rewetting the twisted ribs locally (like with a small piece of damp cloth) and seeing if you can reset them with a plank iron and more clamps. There's no important glue nearby that the water would affect.

Im not sure I entirely understand what you mean by laying a plank and seeing if it straightens out.   If it is what I imagine, that might be more fiddly than Im prepared to deal with at this point, ha!   Im sort of leaning towards just fairing the frames and leaving the twist as is.   They are fairly set in that twist, though its a hard to tell as Ive already spot glued them above the sheer tab so they don't move much as it is.  Thinking about the amount of glue I used however lets me believe it wouldn't really be much to undo them.  Rewetting them is an idea, I hadn't thought of that.  I'll give that a try on one tonight and see if I can get anywhere.   Thanks for the input. 

Edited by maturin

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Sorry, what I meant was, if you lay a few planks laterally along all the ribs (the way they'll eventually be installed) and clamp the twisted ribs to them, does the stiffness of the planking help straighten the rib out or does it stay twisted such that the rib hits the plank on edge rather than on a surface? If they'll happily twist back when clamped/glued to a plank, it shouldn't matter. If they have to be really forced to meet the plank's surface or won't go at all, you probably do have to do more. Just using a clamp alone won't tell you, what matters is how they interact with a plank, so I thought it might be worth a test.

 

Either way I think the rewetting is worth a try, though I don't know if it'll work. One thought on leaving them and just fairing, consider that once you remove the bulkheads, the ribs will be really visible. So even though fairing the outer surface will eliminate the twist up against the plank, from the inside (as the final model will be viewed) it'll be really obvious that some ribs are weirdly twisted because you'll see their inner surfaces non parallel with the hull and they'll look oddly trapezoidal with the fairing on one side.

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3 hours ago, Cathead said:

Either way I think the rewetting is worth a try,

I think I have to agree, what do you have to lose?

 

I see you have a bending iron. I would wet the wood, apply the iron (starting maybe 1/2 an inch above the bend) let it sizzle for a while, perhaps adding more water with an eye-dropper, then try twisting. Rinse and repeat until it works or fails.

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Hi All, 

 

Well the rewetting and twist method worked well enough for me to feel like I could move forward.   The affected frames twisted back into more acceptable alignment with the building jig bulkheads and after a bit of waiting everything seemed ok after removing the clips.   Then, as you do, I took off on a sailing trip of my own...   

 

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After returning and getting back to to the build, I managed to fair the frames enough to feel confident in a start in on planking.   I followed the instructions and went alternating between the garboard and sheer planks and managed four total in about a half-days worth of work.   I was bending/twisting on a soldering iron with a plank bending attachment and doing this dry seemed to work find so long as I was careful.   No scorching or burning was observed.  

 

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I did however note that my addition of the thin planking over the transom did put me at risk of not having enough material as the planks are not quite long enough for comfort.   It will work but their will not be much material and so little room for error. 

 

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Ive also noticed that unfortunately my planks are quite tight at the stern and will require a bit something to get things to work properly.   Right now I can bend the planks down to fit flush against the transom with my hand, but I cannot devise a suitable clamping arrangement to actually hold them...   I may have to use a bit of CA which I was reticent to do.  I absolutely abhor the stuff, but I suppose I don't have much of an option at this point.   Ive also noticed that in a few places a certain frame just isn't meeting flush against the planking, and Im thinking that after the whole thing is complete I'll be able to flip the hull and reglue that frame down into and against the hull.   In the last photo this is illustrated at the #4 bulkhead.  Im wondering if I should have faired a bit more off the frames...   its difficult for me to know.   Im also wondering if the planks are meant to meet flush against the 1-3 bulkheads despite the fact that they aren't going to receive frames until later.   As it is right now, my planks float a bit off the bulkheads but meet nicely at the rabbet.  

 

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The above photo shows how horribly the planks are coming together at the transom...   Im certain this is not how it is meant to be.  I may be coming back to this after all the planking is done and mounting the transom last as others have done.   Its very difficult for me right now to see this and not know what to do.   I know Ive done something badly, I don't know exactly what that is, so my gut says order more parts, start over.   But I also just want to carry on and see where it goes and how I might be able to recover from it.   When this stuff happens do we just keep moving forward and try to recover later...  how far along is too far along to back up and start all over?   Its very frustrating given my past experiences and how discouraging it can be.  In my professional life, the best lesson has always been "You are only ever as good as your ability to recover from your mistakes..."    Good rule in ship modeling or will it compound and compound...   I just don't know.

 

IMG_0099.jpeg

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2 hours ago, maturin said:

did put me at risk of not having enough material as the planks are not quite long enough for comfort.

And the bitch of it is that they could easily have cut them all a bit longer. (they could have also left enough spare to cut another transom)

 

2 hours ago, maturin said:

The above photo shows how horribly the planks are coming together at the transom...

For bending the planks, I just dipped them in boiling water until pliable (about 15 seconds?) then clamped them in place to dry overnight. You should be able to reheat the last section and apply more twist, but clamping is still not easy there.

 

Later in the build I started using rubber bands with balsa blocks and wedges. Easy to cut and soft enough not to damage much.

 

 

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I see what you mean about the transom planks. I think you said you were bending the planks dry with an iron? I wonder if that's part of your problem, I don't think that'll get them fully formed. Ideally each plank should dry into its final shape, such that you barely need clamps when you glue them on, and dry heating may or may not achieve that. It's a pretty tight compound curve into the transom after that final bulkhead and they're going to want to spring back out of that (as it looks like they're doing to my eye) unless they hold their own shape. The compound binder clips you're using should be sufficient for this, they're all that I used (as far as I can recall) and were fine for wet bending.

 

I wonder if you could use a similar trick here as for fixing the ribs (glad that worked out okay!)? Release the glue between plank and transom with some alcohol, get a brush or small cloth, wet down the end of each plank (past the last bulkhead) a few times with hot water until it seems pliable, then clamp it in place solidly with a binder clip. A hair dryer on high really accelerates the drying process and the extra heat also helps set the wood fibers. Although you have two down, I bet you could slip a clamp in under the inner ones while you redo the outer ones.

 

It's worth a try, and would keep you from being tempted to rip off the planking entirely. It probably makes sense to address this, as trying to force those planks into a proper shape later could end up with trouble as wood doesn't like staying where it's forced. I think a good rule of thumb is, if a binder clip won't hold it in place, it's not ready to be glued and needs more bending and setting.

 

Finally, I wonder if you could fair that last rib (or its bulkhead) a bit more? From the angle of the photo you gave, it looks like the planks come off that rib nearly straight at the camera, with very little angle slanting them into toward the transom, making the last bend extra-hard to achieve? I can't tell for sure, but that's how it looks in the image.

 

All this being said, you're doing great on most of it. The forward planking looks good, especially the angle on the garboard plank and its successor, as that can easily end up too sharp and produce difficult angles.

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18 hours ago, iMustBeCrazy said:

 

For bending the planks, I just dipped them in boiling water until pliable (about 15 seconds?) then clamped them in place to dry overnight. You should be able to reheat the last section and apply more twist, but clamping is still not easy there.

 

 

 

I think this is probably some very good advice, as well it seems to be reinforced by others as well.   I should take more time and soak, clamp and let dry before even considering any glue.   

 

 

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17 hours ago, Cathead said:

I see what you mean about the transom planks. I think you said you were bending the planks dry with an iron? I wonder if that's part of your problem, I don't think that'll get them fully formed. Ideally each plank should dry into its final shape, such that you barely need clamps when you glue them on, and dry heating may or may not achieve that. It's a pretty tight compound curve into the transom after that final bulkhead and they're going to want to spring back out of that (as it looks like they're doing to my eye) unless they hold their own shape. The compound binder clips you're using should be sufficient for this, they're all that I used (as far as I can recall) and were fine for wet bending.

 

Yes, and that's what Crazy mentioned too.   I think bending them dry may have been problematic, as well I should start shaping them and letting them dry BEFORE glueing them.   When I bent them dry though, they did take and hold a shape but it was far less gradual than what was observed bending the frames.  

 

17 hours ago, Cathead said:

I wonder if you could use a similar trick here as for fixing the ribs (glad that worked out okay!)? Release the glue between plank and transom with some alcohol, get a brush or small cloth, wet down the end of each plank (past the last bulkhead) a few times with hot water until it seems pliable, then clamp it in place solidly with a binder clip. A hair dryer on high really accelerates the drying process and the extra heat also helps set the wood fibers. Although you have two down, I bet you could slip a clamp in under the inner ones while you redo the outer ones.

I think some measure of redoing will be required for sure.   Im using Gorilla Bond wood glue, do you think just isopropyl would be sufficient to release the planks?   I think I may redo the sheer planks completely, but as the kit only provides so much Ill have to be VERY careful with removal.  

17 hours ago, Cathead said:

 

I think a good rule of thumb is, if a binder clip won't hold it in place, it's not ready to be glued and needs more bending and setting.

This is very good advice.   Im writing that on my wall!  

17 hours ago, Cathead said:

 

Finally, I wonder if you could fair that last rib (or its bulkhead) a bit more? From the angle of the photo you gave, it looks like the planks come off that rib nearly straight at the camera, with very little angle slanting them into toward the transom, making the last bend extra-hard to achieve? I can't tell for sure, but that's how it looks in the image.

I think if I can get the two sets of sheer planks off, then I will try this.   It is a hard bend and I can tell looking at the thing that I maybe should have removed a bit more.   I was a over-zealous with the bulkheads and now too conservative with the frames.  Just running battens across the fairing just doesn't provide enough information...

17 hours ago, Cathead said:

 

All this being said, you're doing great on most of it. The forward planking looks good, especially the angle on the garboard plank and its successor, as that can easily end up too sharp and produce difficult angles.

 

Thanks.   This is encouraging. 

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Posted (edited)

Keep your head up. Having people telling you what to do different can be discouraging, even if you asked for the advice. I've never used that brand of glue so I don't know, but one way to find out would be to make a small mockup of a plank and frame with glue, let it dry, then try alcohol and see what happens before you try it on the real model. I often use mockups to test things I've never done, before trying them on an actual model. It's a great way to learn without screwing up the real thing.

 

You may or may not need to take all the planking off; even removing them from a few bulkheads going back could give you enough room to work if you're careful. Certainly better than undoing all the work as the rest looks good.

 

I pulled mine off the shelf and looked at the hull near the stern. Far as I can tell, the planking follows a smooth, flowing curve into the transom, i.e. it doesn't suddenly change direction as it bends around that last frame. I think in a lot of cases, that's a good rule of thumb for fairing and planking; if you can clearly tell where a bulkhead/frame is by a distinct change in the hull's shape, it's not faired enough or something else is wrong. I'm sure there are exceptions and I'm not an expert, but it's a useful conceptual model.

 

Quote

I should take more time and soak, clamp and let dry before even considering any glue.   

Post this on your wall, too! One of the strongest lessons I learned from MSW when I was starting out, treat each plank like its own model and get the plank to sit where it's supposed to with minimal extra help.

 

Oh, and you know what's discouraging? Seeing you get to take a sailing trip while I'm stuck in the landlocked Midwest. Man, I miss sailing. I haven't had a tiller in my hand since 2004 or so. Enjoy your blessing.

Edited by Cathead

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Ok...  so first thanks for encouragement.   I took a deep breath and started the painstaking process of pulling the sheer and neighboring planks.   I left the garboard and 2nd planks as I though those were going well enough.   Using Acetone I was able to run a bead of solvent and the planks immediately released.   I had to do some picking and scraping but otherwise they came off and the frames seemed none the worse for wear.  

 

I decide to set those aside and just start running planks from the keel.   I decided to follow the advice from the above discussions and soaked the planks, bend them on an iron and then clamped them in place to dry.  This worked extremely well when I came back to start shaping the fitting the plank.   The plank gave very little resistance and fit so much more happily.

 

IMG_0147.thumb.jpeg.98aff6e2ae8c32d60902d9e51d9c1bb0.jpeg

IMG_0148.thumb.jpeg.fd41447853f2fdc24d13d65c5a530e19.jpeg

Following this procedure I managed to four planks bent, sit and glued and am thus far quite happy with the results.   Ive got a third set drying as I type this.  There are some obvious issues that I think Ill chalk up as lessons, but otherwise its going well.   Next session Ill turn my attention to resetting the sheer planks and work my way towards the shutter.   

 

IMG_0151.thumb.jpeg.c0b5af13df1649d7373610d7bc904bf9.jpegIMG_0153.thumb.jpeg.3da0c19257bc0b3b7382f3f3fe8658ff.jpegIMG_0152.thumb.jpeg.9cb0e10d7b5a222b69b7ee3c693bdc89.jpegMoving forward...   

 

IMG_0149.jpeg

IMG_0150.jpeg

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G'day Justin,

 

Only one step backwards before going forward is pretty good. Nice to see the planks bending better.

 

Re. Plank 3, see the last pic in post 8. Fixing that would move all the next planks further aft.

 

The other thing you can do if needed is remove the transom and shave a bit off the supports to move it forwards (by the way, what's holding your transom on?).

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10 hours ago, iMustBeCrazy said:

G'day Justin,

 

Only one step backwards before going forward is pretty good. Nice to see the planks bending better.

 

Re. Plank 3, see the last pic in post 8. Fixing that would move all the next planks further aft.

 

The other thing you can do if needed is remove the transom and shave a bit off the supports to move it forwards (by the way, what's holding your transom on?).

Yes, I think you are right overall.  Looking at this pic it may be easier to see that I did remove some material from plank #3 and the subsequent planks in order to get a better fit:

IMG_0153.thumb.jpeg.37e53ee0bb38d499768900adef0ff7aa.jpeg

I think at this point Im going to leave the transom in place to help shape the planks but not glue them down.   After planking overall, I think Ill do as usedtosail did where he ended up needing to remove the transom and cut a new one after planking.  I think Ill then do as you suggest and remove the transom and shave a bit off the keel support to bring it forward a "tiny" bit.   Hopefully this doesn't throw everything else out of wack.   

 

 

 

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3 hours ago, Justin P. said:

Hopefully this doesn't throw everything else out of wack.

Aesthetically, no problem.

However the transom will be smaller than the shape made by the planks unless the planks are narrowed. So moving the transom sooner means less to fix after.

 

Or you could cut a new slightly larger transom.

 

Life would be so much easier if we didn't keep stuffing up........... But where would the fun be in that!

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So glad to hear this went well! Great job on working this out. Looks really nice.

 

One other small note that I learned the hard way, when you're presoaking planks and clamping them to dry next to planks that are already glued, make sure they're not too wet. I wipe mine down first with a rag. If they release some water, that can wick in under the previous plank and soften the glue with rather frustrating consequences.

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16 hours ago, iMustBeCrazy said:

Aesthetically, no problem.

However the transom will be smaller than the shape made by the planks unless the planks are narrowed. So moving the transom sooner means less to fix after.

 

Or you could cut a new slightly larger transom.

 

Life would be so much easier if we didn't keep stuffing up........... But where would the fun be in that!

Yes, I came to this conclusion myself as well.   I decide to head out and go ahead and remove the transom now rather than wait.   I decided to remove it and thin it down rather than try to remove material from the stern post.   To gain additional cushion I also cut a slot into the transom for the stern post to fit into.   I did not have to reduce the overall dimensions of the transom as the existing planks seems to fit nicely.  Ill remove a bit more material from that final frame forward of the transom to better ease that transition but not so much that Im getting an unsightly bend and try to be mindful of the need to narrow the planks some at the stern as I move along with planking.IMG_0155.thumb.jpeg.2a258f42e8c68401e4834f8d550b1238.jpegIMG_0156.thumb.jpeg.0362713d8252b7b7b7df75cfd38e9f3c.jpeg

 

Thanks for the advice. 

 

 

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10 hours ago, Cathead said:

So glad to hear this went well! Great job on working this out. Looks really nice.

 

One other small note that I learned the hard way, when you're presoaking planks and clamping them to dry next to planks that are already glued, make sure they're not too wet. I wipe mine down first with a rag. If they release some water, that can wick in under the previous plank and soften the glue with rather frustrating consequences.

Thanks. 

 

Yes, definitely.   I work with various adhesives in my day job, so Im quite aware of reactivation.  Ive been wiping them down quite a bit before fitting and that has helped.   There have a been a couple spots where the drying plank has lightly adhered at the frames where there was a touch of excess glue from putting down the plank before it but no other big problems related to this. 

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Cool, sorry to condescend as you already knew that. Also just noticed you changed your username, confused the heck out of me for a minute.

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1 hour ago, Cathead said:

Cool, sorry to condescend as you already knew that. Also just noticed you changed your username, confused the heck out of me for a minute.

Ha..  yes, no offense taken!  It was a very important detail to bring up!

 

I did change my username, it seemed silly to me now as Ive met a few other members in person not to use my real name.  I also noticed there is another member using a similar moniker and I didn't want to get confused myself.    As I thought about it, "Maturin" and/or variations on the name might be quite popular in a ship-modeling community!   Ive gone 5 years as a member and it only occurred to me recently, ha. 

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And so goes the 4th weekend without an opportunity to return to my model.   The end of summer is always a busy time, and Im seriously missing making headway.   I head out to the shop and visit my model almost overnight wishing I had an hour setup and lay a plank.   October looks more promising. 

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