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Rethink on next project

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Hello All ,

I have no doubt that many people get totally hooked into model coat / ship building and I can see why . As I have said in a previous topic I am in the process of making ALs "Marie-Jeanne" and really getting into it to the point of looking towards my next model to make . I don't want to get carried away with things and having looked at quite a few different models to make then changing my mind , I have once again decided to put it to this forum and seek help .

If I only ever make one more model , I want it to be a showpiece and something that I would be proud to pass on to my grandson , and with this in mind I now have a few different models in mind . I would like to make a classic / traditional schooner type boat approximately around 32" to 36" in length , and one that does not present to much difficulty with rigging and sails (one mast would be ideal) , but I know not always practical . It must have really nice lines and preferably pre made sails . Three that I have looked at are , "Bluenose" , "Pride of Baltimore" and "Dapper Tom" . I am looking for advice as to which of these or indeed any other models to go for . I know with Bluenose that several companies manufacture this model so some advice as to best one would be usefull .

All help appreciated

Mike

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Part of your decision will be based on your preferred building method. Bluenose and Pride II are both plank-on-bulkhead kits, Dapper Tom is solid hull. If you hunt around, you can find some other schooners available, too, such as OcCre's Esmeralda, Caldercraft's Ballahoo or Pickle, and some others.

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Thing is will you never ever achieve that one model, your skill sets improve as you go on, and provided you are not to old like me, there will allways be another "just one model" to improve on your last one 

 

 

Hope that makes some sence 

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After having looked at various models for my next project , I rather like the idea of attempting to make the plank on bulkhead "Pride of Baltimore" because it fits the traditional working schooner look that I am after . I know it will take me sometime to complete , but I am a little daunted by doing all the rigging and blocks etc , so for someone like myself who has never done rigging before what are your opinions for a first timer on this model ? Also I have not checked if the Model Shipways Pride comes with sails but I quite like the idea of only showing furled sails on this model , has anyone done this before  and do you think it would be effective enough ?

Appreciate any views or thoughts .

Mike

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Go to the link below and you can download the instructions and parts list for the kit to preview the entire build.    https://modelexpo-online.com/model-shipways-pride-of-baltimore-2-1-64-scale

 

This is a pretty small kit at 1/64 scale and in my opinion smaller kits are harder to rig.  Have you looked at their Glad Tidings kit?  It's a larger scale but not a large model when completed and the rigging will be easier at a larger scale  (at least in my opinion). 

 

Kurt

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First off, no matter what your next build is, it can be any model, but it's up to YOU to make it that show piece that would make you proud to pass down to future generations. A kit is a kit and only a starting point. But it's up to the builder on how much time, effort and research (oooops, there's a dirty word) that will either make an acceptable model or take that same acceptable model to the next level. I usually spend as much time researching a particular build as I do actually working on the model. I have built two out of the three you mention, the Model Shipways Bluenose, which went to a fellow in Canada. This is a great model for the beginner, easy to plank and it give detailed instructions on the proper way of deck planking. Model Shipways The Pride of Baltimore went to a fellow in Niagara Falls NY. It also was a fun model to build, but more of a second intermediate level model. It too has great plans and if memory serves, the plans on both were by Ben Lankford, who is one of the best at it.

 

A piece of advice, never look towards your next build until you have a few models under your belt. I have finished several models where the owner had all the intentions in the world of finishing them, but life gets in the way and they just never got around to finishing them. Then someone like me steps in and finishes the model. Ebay is full of them. The last two models rear paddle wheeler river boat, Chris Craft mahogany runabout I finished where latch key kids abandoned and not to mention the next two, a 1930 Chris Craft Runabout and a Vietnam Gun Boat I will have to finish.

 

Good luck on your current build and future builds,

mike

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Forgot to mention I was also looking at the Scottish Maid by Artesania Latina . This was actually my first choice but I was put off slightly by views on this forum that it was a common occurrence for AL to miss out parts or pieces from their kits ? It actually happened to my Marie -Jeanne . Apparantly AL have now gone out of business so there will be no chance of recuperating any missing parts from their kits now .

Can any member here tell me which of the two kits , Scottish Maid or Benjamin Latham would be the most difficult to make ?

Thanks for reading

Mike 

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The key word in your question is "favorite". They are both very nice models. I have seen a finished Latham at an exhibit, and it is really something special if one adds a full suite of sails -- the model in the box photo doesn't do the kit justice IMO. You should give some thought to which one really gets your motor running -- doldrums are inevitable in any lengthy build, and truly liking your kit subject goes a long way toward alleviating that malady.

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The Ben Latham is made by Model Shipways and one of my favorites, although I have never built that particular model, I have always wanted to.  If I had to choose between the two kits, I would always opt for the model shipways kit, some of the best plans on the planet as well as instructions and the fact that it's an American manufacture doesn't hurt either. I have never built the Scotish Maid, but I have heard that it's a bear of a kit to build as is most of the cheaper foreign kits are. 

 

I would like to add here that if you are into seller your models or might be in the future, picking American ship representations sells 10 times better than ship models represented from other countries with a few exceptions. Models of French ships are some of the worst to sell. I built a few and couldn't hardly give them away. So I steered clear of them after I realized this. English ships are second and Spanish ships are third on the list for most buyers. But there are exceptions to ever rule.   

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If you go on Ebay, you can usually find the OLD Ben Latham kits in the square yellow boxes that are solid hulls, which would make an awesome build especially if you bought some thin wood strips and glued them to the hull, which would give it the planked on frame appearance. 

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Hello mtdoramike, 

Regarding the old yellow box Ben Latham kits. Are they the same size inch for inch as the modern day POB Ben Latham kits and also do they have equal decking furniture or is new better than old??. 

I would consider buying an old Ben Latham kit but most are from the USA who's goods usually incur ridiculous extra UK customs charges. Anyone from UK selling one? 

Thanks

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The old kits are 1/96th solid hull, the new POB ME kits are 1/48th. The old kits come in 2 flavors. The 2nd version of the Yellow Box kits have more rigging detail shown on the plans, and the rigging is shown by red lines, helping you to distinguish them from the hull/mast details.

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Hello Roger ,

Thanks for your reply , can you tell me if HCs book shows you any actual plans of the various fishing schooners , that you could re size to a smaller model scale ?

Thanks

Mike

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Chapelle’s book includes 130 full page plates of fishing Schooner plans (hull lines drawings) including one of Benjamin Latham, but the real reason why I think that the book would be helpful is that the last 300+ pages are a reproduction of Chapelle’s notebook detailing in minute detail the construction and fittings of these interesting vessels.  This information was taken from actual vessels and contemporary marine equipment catalogs.  BTW any of the 130 plates in the book should be available in a larger sized format from the Smithsonian Institution.

 

Roger

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