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Traditional Wooden Boats in the Norwegian Maritime Museum, Oslo

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I recently spent a few days in Oslo and had the opportunity to visit the Norsk Maritimt Museum. They have a small collection of wooden boats strongly reminiscent of the Viking Age - more than a thousand years on: https://www.maritima-et-mechanika.org/maritime/oslo/oslo.html

 

https://www.maritima-et-mechanika.org/maritime/oslo/191533-72.jpg

 

For comparison, there are also a few pictures of the boats from the GOKSTAD-grave in the Vikingskibethus.

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Posted (edited)

sorry, have deleted a posting of mine, done here by mistake

Nils

Edited by Mirabell61

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Great pictures wefalck. Now time for a stupid question. Those boats were open to the elements, so would collect rain or melted snow water in the bilges, also they would ship water under oars or sail in calm to moderate seas then there are the lively seas that might come aboard anytime from any direction, No pump wells or dipper wells, water looks like it was allowed free movement in the bilges. Has any means to dewater those boats been found in the remains now on display, modern or ancient? Closest I ever was to seasick was when I had my head in the bilges just forward of the engine of a 34' Troller in SE Alaska. There because the pump could not keep the bilges pumped because it was rough and the bulge water was running back and forth in the bottoms, coming up the sides and getting into out bunks and cooking area, I was there with a flattened on one side gallon can catching some of that water as it went by, made it through 3 gallons and had to get out of there, from the wheelhouse my head and belly returned to normal, since that experience in 1965, I always look to see how water in the bilges is managed and the reason for my inquiry. Cans and scoops have their limits.

 

 

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Very simple: there are shovel-like implements with short handles, bailers. I think you can see one on one of the images. If I am not mistaken they found such bailers in the ship-graves.

It works with keel-boats as well as with flat bottoms. 

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