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AlexBaranov

HMS Enterprise by AlexBaranov - 1:36

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I begin the construction of two Royal Navy frigates: HMS Enterprise and HMS Siren. These are two frigates of the same type. Both models will be built in the classic Gregorian style using technology and vintage style (using artificial aging technology). The scale for the models is 1:36. These are quite large models with a maximum length of 1200 mm.

A huge database of drawings is here:

https://prints.rmg.co.uk/collections/ship-plans/products/syren-siren-1773-j6307

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Hi, nice to see HMS Enterprize building. I am building the same since one year, and finishing hull planking  and treenails.

 

Regards, 

Rafał

Edited by ralfee3

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Dear Rafał
I assume that you are using drawings that I used at the beginning too. These are drawings of Polish origin.
Very inaccurate, have a lot of mistakes. Even the name of the ship is spelled: "ENTERPRIZE"! Therefore, I bought a drawing of the same type of ship on the official website of the museum in Greenwich.
It is better to use drawings from an impeccable archival source.
Greetings
Alex Baranov

Edited by AlexBaranov
mistakes

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Yes, you are right I use Polish Shipyard plans. I am aware of  simplifications, but it is my second scratch building, the first was simple merchant ship. For sure I will follow your building blog with huge interest 🙂

 

regards,

Rafał

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Dear Alex, in the documents from the time the ship's name was spelled "Enterprize", 

therefore I presume it's the original name, used in the Royal Museum Greenwich files as well.

I just reviewed Shipyard plans posted on your build log on Russian forum, they seems to be useful.

Good luck with you newest projects, I admire your work and focus to visual effects, not necessarily 

historically correct. 

Please keep us updated with the progress and please, please share some details of your fine technique 

of developing deck fittings and rigging. Thanks

JR

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11 hours ago, JANRUS said:

Dear Alex, in the documents from the time the ship's name was spelled "Enterprize", 

therefore I presume it's the original name, used in the Royal Museum Greenwich files as well.

I just reviewed ShiYes indeed. On this page there is a mention of the frigate Enterprise. And this name is written through the letter Z.pyard plans posted on your build log on Russian forum, they seems to be useful.

Good luck with you newest projects, I admire your work and focus to visual effects, not necessarily 

historically correct.

Please keep us updated with the progress and please, please share some details of your fine technique 

of developing deck fittings and rigging. Thanks

JR

Yes indeed. On this page there is a mention of the frigate Enterprise. And this name is written through the letter Z.

https://prints.rmg.co.uk/collections/ship-plans/products/syren-siren-1773-j6307

Perhaps this is what they wrote in the 18th century and the original name was left in the annotation. However, as far as I know in modern English, there is no such word "EnterpriZe". This word is now spelled as: Enterprise. I can assume that English as one of the young languages has a constant transformation. For example, in the ancient books of the 16th century, the modern combination of "TH" is written and read as "T". 

The change in pronunciation and spelling of some letters and sounds are associated with some negative factors that have occurred in English history.

On the frigate that I am building now, I will write the name in the modern manner "Enterprise"

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49 minutes ago, bdgiantman2 said:

Am I seeing small pieces of PVC pipe being used for base of masts? If so, that is sneaky of you.

 

Brian :)

Dear Brian. Obviously, the quality of the photos did not allow you to clearly see the design of the ship. The mast steps are carved from beech wood. In addition, the masts have different diameters. Based on your assumption, it would not be wise to make steps of different diameters from a plastic pipe of the same diameter. Confusion turns out ... yes?

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19 minutes ago, dvm27 said:

Another beautiful model on the stocks, Alex. I don't notice a rabbet. Are you planking with veneered stock?

The draft hull of the ship is made of alder wood. Fine cladding made of pink pear veneer. I made black veneer on my own from blackwood. This is the choice of saving money. Pear boards have a price of $ 24,000 per cubic meter. Pear veneer has a price of 35 dollars one meter square. For the ship, I use two meters of square pear veneer and only one pear board (100mm X 30mm X 800mm)

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11 minutes ago, archjofo said:

Hello Alex,

I am always happy to see you at work and I am looking forward to further progress.
My admiration for your modeling skills is certain.

Hello Johann
Thank.
However, your experience and skill deserve special attention. You are building very gorgeous models! In today's world of consumption, your mastery is rare.
For me, building models is already an ordinary job. I wanted to build two identical frigates at the same time (Enterprise and Siren). But something went wrong ... Now I am building only one ship. I hope that in the near future the hull of the second frigate will be ready.

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Alex,

A beautiful hull!

I am curious how you did build the hull. It doesn't look like a POF or POB built hull, more like a hollow block model. Do you have pictures of the making process of it?

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46 minutes ago, G.L. said:

Alex,

A beautiful hull!

I am curious how you did build the hull. It doesn't look like a POF or POB built hull, more like a hollow block model. Do you have pictures of the making process of it?

The hull of the ship is made of individual parts cut on a CNC milling machine. Alder wood. Then the body is assembled on glue and fastened with beams and velvet. I did not take photos of a very long and monotonous milling process.

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3 hours ago, AlexBaranov said:

The hull of the ship is made of individual parts cut on a CNC milling machine. Alder wood. Then the body is assembled on glue and fastened with beams and velvet. I did not take photos of a very long and monotonous milling process.

Thank you for your answer Alex. That is probably what you mean by 'using technology and vintage style' in your first post.

It looks very, very nice.

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27 minutes ago, G.L. said:

Thank you for your answer Alex. That is probably what you mean by 'using technology and vintage style' in your first post.

It looks very, very nice.

Thank. Vintage is generally a copy of an old thing with traces of exploitation and time. I copy the exterior of old museum models of the appropriate style. But without traces of exploitation. The new fashion "torn pants with holes" someone believes that this is vintage. I argue that this is simply worn clothing characteristic of the poor or low strata of society. This is not vintage but a substitute for concepts. Vintage is primarily a kind of noble antiques antiquity.

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4 hours ago, AlexBaranov said:

Thank. Vintage is generally a copy of an old thing with traces of exploitation and time. I copy the exterior of old museum models of the appropriate style. But without traces of exploitation. The new fashion "torn pants with holes" someone believes that this is vintage. I argue that this is simply worn clothing characteristic of the poor or low strata of society. This is not vintage but a substitute for concepts. Vintage is primarily a kind of noble antiques antiquity.

Alex, I agree.

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