Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I am a high school CAD drafting and wood shop teacher so I have access to various types of lumber. I have alder, red oak, wormy maple, cedar, spruce, African mahogany, and walnut. I was planning on using some scrap I have lying around the shop for filler blocks. What species listed would be best? Does it really matter? I was thinking of going with alder because it is the cheapest and I have it in abundance. 

 

Second question is that I have read it can be good to have the filler blocks level with the deck level of the bulkheads to give a nice solid base for the deck. Similarly, having the filler blocks go out to the outboard edges of the bulkheads makes for a good surface for the planking. So essentially creating a solid hull with filler blocks between all the bulkheads from deck to keel to outboard. Is there any downside to doing this?

 

I posed this question in my build log but I didn't get an answer there before it got buried in other build log posts, so I'm posting here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do not recommend overdoing it will filler block filling gaps between all bulkheads. This may bring hull cracking problem due to seasonal humidity variations. I would use filler blocks only where you need them for planking job. I prefer using the wood which is as easy to shape as possible. Balsa blocks are the easiest to work with.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Matt,

 

I have had good experience with filler blocks, both to assist in hull fairing and to support planking.  I recommend something firmer than balsa such as bass, pine, or popular.  I have attached pictures of my Fair American  build for reference.

 

Regards,

Pete

image0049.jpg

image0052.jpg

Image0151.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Pete Jaquith said:

Matt,

 

I have had good experience with filler blocks, both to assist in hull fairing and to support planking.  I recommend something firmer than balsa such as bass, pine, or popular.  I have attached pictures of my Fair American  build for reference.

 

Regards,

Pete

Thanks Pete, I like how you did it. It makes sense to put them in the bow and stern where the hull curves to allow a better base for the planks to adhere to, but not in the center where it isn't necessary for planking. As far as the deck goes I may add a smaller filler block on the upper and inner part of the bulkheads between every other set of bulkheads that will create a good base for the deck planks. Thanks for the pictures.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Matt, I’ve always used balsa for filler blocks as it sands easy and there is less chance of altering the bulkhead shape  if you use a harder wood - it lets you use the bulkheads as a guide and shapes so readily. As far as the deck I usually make a false deck from some 1/64 or 1/32 ply if the kit didn’t come with one - that way you can lay out all the grates and deck furnishings on it and configure your planking plan on it.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used balsa on my build of HMS Agamemnon, it was as good as useless in my mind. In future I would use a soft wood but much firmer than balsa which would accept a pin and hold it without straining to push it in. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alder should work.  A species near the plywood hardness  makes shaping it more work to no real advantage.

Going all the way inside the hull gives a base that is firm enough for one layer of planking - if two layers is the design.

If the below the waterline hull is to be coppered, adding the plank thickness to the filler dimension and scabing that layer

to the face of the molds (bulkheads) = no planking needed in the way of the copper.

No - to using it as a deck underlayment.  Trim the inside of the filler to be  a bit thicker than the frames would be.  They do not

need faring - rough and staggered at that face is sufficient. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you all for the info I appreciate it, it is all very helpful. Pete thank you for the pictures and explanations, I also did bump into your build log and looked through the first page in detail earlier today for a bit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think I will use filler blocks in the stern and bow sections for the bends of the planks. As far as the decks go I will add small filler sections along the outboard edges and around the mast positions.


Essentially following a similar design to what Pete showed in his photos and build of the Fair American.

 

I have decided to go with Alder, that is what I have in abundance, but it is also the lightest of the woods I have and the least dense. So it shouldn't take too much to shape. I'll update my build log when I am done, I may come back and post a picture or two here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just to add to the conversation; whatever you use you have to consider that wood WILL move (swell/reduce) with humidity etc.  If using grained woods try to match the grain direction on both sides using the same wood type.  If no room is allowed between some sections it may distort the hull but probably minimal?  May not be as great an issue once all the planks are on as this will provide additional rigidity.  The more experienced will know.  The bulkheads are usually ply so they are not prone to this wood movement.

 

I have used balasa successfully BUT I always coat the outer (gluing) surface with a diluted PVA glue solution to fill the 'pores' and give a better sticking surface to the filler.

 

cheers

 

Pat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the input Banyan, I do plan to have the grain run the same in each section. The thickness, width, and length directions of each filler will run the same as each other filler.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is an article that I posted back on April 13 in the Filler Block topic under the heading Building, Framing, Planking and plating a ships hull and deck.

 

   When I first saw this posting of this topic, I was reminded of seeing that in the March/April issue of Ships in Scale there was a short article on converting POB construction to solid hull construction by Robert Brandt.  In his article, he described his method of using foam blocks to fill in between frames allowing him to use a single layer of planking that would have continuous solid support and eliminate the problem of hollow spots in between frames.  (Something quite important if you intend to use a natural finish rather than painting the model.)

    He thought that by using extruded polystyrene foam for his blocking, the ease of cutting and shaping the blocks was easier than using wood.  As an added bonus this would add very little in terms of weight.  The excellent compressive strength of this type of foam doesn’t hurt either.

    Shown below are the illustrations of his method that were shown in his article.  (Currently being reviewed by my assistant.)

100_5447.thumb.JPG.a8553449aff3eb29a406608d5101ddd9.JPG

     A version of this type of foam that is readily available throughout North America is Dow Blue Styrofoam.  STYROFOAM™ Brand Insulation is the original extruded polystyrene foam insulation, invented by Dow and first manufactured by them in 1941.  Dow's blue colored extruded polystyrene Blue Board's closed cell structure and lack of voids resists water and water vapor penetration thus protecting underlying materials from water damage. 

    This product is also available in several sheet sizes and thicknesses and is relatively inexpensive.  It does however, require the use of a particular type of adhesive, as some types of adhesive will dissolve the board. 

 

   There is also very little in the way of shrinking or expanding due to temperature, so once it's in place it would be very stable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Dave, very useful information I'll consider that option as well. I am building the Syren and it is only a single planking, however it will be copper plated. Your assistant looks like he/she is very deep in thought!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

About us

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research

SSL Secured

Your security is important for us so this Website is SSL-Secured

NRG Mailing Address

Nautical Research Guild
237 South Lincoln Street
Westmont IL, 60559-1917

About the NRG

If you enjoy building ship models that are historically accurate as well as beautiful, then The Nautical Research Guild (NRG) is just right for you.

The Guild is a non-profit educational organization whose mission is to “Advance Ship Modeling Through Research”. We provide support to our members in their efforts to raise the quality of their model ships.

The Nautical Research Guild has published our world-renowned quarterly magazine, The Nautical Research Journal, since 1955. The pages of the Journal are full of articles by accomplished ship modelers who show you how they create those exquisite details on their models, and by maritime historians who show you the correct details to build. The Journal is available in both print and digital editions. Go to the NRG web site (www.thenrg.org) to download a complimentary digital copy of the Journal. The NRG also publishes plan sets, books and compilations of back issues of the Journal and the former Ships in Scale and Model Ship Builder magazines.

Our Emblem

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research
×
×
  • Create New...