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This pretty much catches me up to date.  if there is anything I missed from the old log that you would like to see, please let me know.  Here are some shots of the mast detail.  If you look closely you will see holes drilled for "mast sheaves" in the topmasts.  I don't know what they were used for - my best guess is that they had something to do with stepping and unstepping  the topmasts.

 

Main mast top

 

post-547-0-77648500-1362684495_thumb.jpg

 

Fore mast top

 

post-547-0-93262400-1362684497_thumb.jpg

 

Main topmast detail

 

post-547-0-83993100-1362684499_thumb.jpg

 

Fore topmast detail

 

post-547-0-73499400-1362684501_thumb.jpg

 

Thanks for all the support and encouragement over the past few years - now to move forward!

 

Bob

Edited by bhermann
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        Hi bob!

         One more time, cheers for your logs...

         Guys like you are  essential for  apprentice like me

         I consult your site regularly to note your progress, your tricks...

         Continue!! I realy appreciate what you do.

 

                      Pier44,

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Hey Bob,

 

I have been quietly enjoying your log for sometime now but I cannot remain silent any more.  Your build is truly fantastic.  And the log you had on the old site was such a wealth of knowledge...  I am so glad you are back up and running.    I want you to know that I have been building a bluenose for over a year now (the same kit as yours) and this log help to persuade me to do it.  I thank you.  The bluenose is truly one of the most beautiful ships to me.  Her lines are like no other.   I just wish I lived back in the days of the original America cup.  To see those boats rip through the rough water like titans would have been amazing.  And the guts those sailers must have had to sail in the rough Atlantic waters....nuts.  I read somewhere that most of those who sail amongst those ships could not even swim.  They thought that there was no point, that by the time a man fell over board in those types of waves they were a goner anyways...  Keep up the good work. I think builds like your bluenose are staples among the "halls" of the Model Ship World.

 

Brian

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Pier44 - thanks for the positive feedback.  Sharing my issues and techniques is one of the main drivers behind doing the log for me.  As a first time builder, it is nice to be able to give back something as well as benefiting from all the great information shared on MSW.

 

Brian - I agree that Bluenose is indeed a lovely vessel.  One of my favorite experiences over the past few years was taking a windjammer cruise on a gaff-rigged schooner where the passengers were able to share in the work of hauling anchor, setting and furling the sails, and taking a turn at the helm.  I learned more about sailing over that week than I thought possible.  Working on Bluenose brings back memories of that time and the amazing feel of been out on the water running under wind power.  I took a look at your Niagara log - it appears you have some good ideas to share.  I will be following along with interest.  When you get back to Bluenose, I'd love to see some photos of your work there too.

 

Bob

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Houston, we have a problem... while attaching blocks to the fore gaff I noticed the rope with the parrel beads hanging loose.  Upon closer inspection I discovered that one side had pulled right through the gaff jaw and I now have a repair to make.

 

post-547-0-99780300-1362765470_thumb.jpg

 

post-547-0-20670500-1362765469_thumb.jpg

 

I'm at a bit of a loss how to handle this.  I thought of gluing a toothpick in there, sanding, then re-drilling the hole.  I am also considering filing off a larger chunk, gluing and clamping some replacement wood, sanding that down, and re-drilling.  I am concerned about the strength of the wood - the section is about 1/16" square and I'm not sure how much abuse it can take.  Any thoughts and ideas are welcome!

 

Bob

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Bob. I'll tell you what I would have done. File off a larger piece than the damaged one, thus achieving a clean cut. Then glue a new piece in place and soak with CA glue. That will provide a good level of strength. Maybe also the opposite side needs a few drops of CA, just to be on the safe side. But thats me, I know some people doesnt like CA as much as I do :)

 

/Alfons

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Bob,

I had the same problem with the parcels pulling out of the gaff. I've considered the same repair Alfonso describes, just need to get on with it. I like the way you did the jib boom fitting. Once again I'm copying your metalwork. Your ideas are much better than my own. Thank you for updating your build log, you have a great practicum going.

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Bob:

Sorry to say, the best way to repair that area is to take the jaw off and replace it. Use dowels to fasten it to the gaff and that way you will not have any problem with future repairs should they become necessary. Those metal fastenings are in your way. I would also also get some harder, denser wood to make your jaws next time. Not sure why that area failed, but if it is soft wood, that is probably part of the problem.

 

Russ

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Ahoy Bob :D

 

If you are going to paint these parts I have found applying a coat of thin CA can add a considerable amount of strength to Basswood

 

I tack the part to a toothpick and drizzle the CA all over it. Be generous and let it soak in while rotating the part. Dab it to a paper towel to remove any excess. Once dry, sand it smooth. Make sure the part is "completely dry" before touching it  "LOL"

 

Other then that suggestion I am with Russ, harder wood.

Edited by JPett
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Thanks for the ideas, guys.  There are some interesting alternatives here.

 

Russ - I am going to hold removing and rebuilding the jaw as a last resort.  I'm sure that the basswoods softness was a contributor to the failure.  Looking at the damage it also appears the hole was not centered very well, which gave the thread less wood to pull through.

 

Alfons - I assume you are referring to thin CA for soaking the wood.  I only have medium thickness on hand and may need to get some thin, if that is the case.  I will probably hit the other side and the other jaws (two additional sets) with CA - applying from the end of the jaws where the wood grain is open.  Floyd, thanks for the reinforcement on this approach.

 

Dave - interesting that you have experienced the same thing.  I can't recall reading of this in any log, but it must be a more common occurrence than I realized.

 

JP - nope, no painting planned here, so I'll just have to be careful with whatever I do.

 

I am starting to form some additional ideas as well and may try something a little different as a first attempt.  I'll document my process (or processes if I need more than one)  and we'll see where it goes.

 

Thanks,

Bob

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Thanks for the response, Alfons.  I was too impatient to wait until I had a chance to get to the LHS, so I used the medium CA I have on hand.  It worked OK, I just had to redrill the holes a little.

 

For the first attempt at a repair, I filed away half the broken end of the jaw

 

post-547-0-93139100-1363195773_thumb.jpg

 

Then glued a piece of stripwood onto the cut and clamped it overnight.

 

post-547-0-73741700-1363195776_thumb.jpg

 

post-547-0-66155000-1363195780_thumb.jpg

 

Then I filed away the overhanging parts and was left with this.

 

post-547-0-84351200-1363195778_thumb.jpg

 

It was a bit thin for my taste so I glued and clamped another piece, then filed away the excess.

 

This is what I was left with

 

post-547-0-65260600-1363195784_thumb.jpg

 

post-547-0-08725700-1363195787_thumb.jpg

 

Once that was done, I drilled the hole, applied CA to the end of the piece, and redrilled.  I put some line through the hole and gave it a few good tugs.  It feels much more secure than the original, so I won't be moving on to attempt number 2 or 3.  Number 2 would have been to cut the end of the jaw flat and dowel on some fresh stock.  Number 3 was removing the entire jaw, which probably would have led to number 4 - rebuilding the entire gaff - whew!

 

Thanks for all the suggestions and for sticking with this.

 

Bob

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Yes Bob your repairs seem to have worked out just fine. Working with such small parts can really be a challenge. Things like those jaws can be delicate. Giving them a little more strength might be good to keep your ship from breaking down the road while working around it.

 

Brian

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Bob,

 

Another thought for the future would be to replace the basswood (in areas where you have to drill with litle edge margin) with a harder wood like boxwood, cherry or maple.

 

Good save though. And I think this kind of problem happens more often than we think.

 

Thanks,

 

Harvey

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Thanks Russ, Elia, Brian and Harvey.  I am happy I didn't have to execute on anything more drastic.  I agree that people spend more time on repairs than they like to report - me, I've got nothing to lose so I just let it all out there.  Hopefully someone will benefit from it, as I have benefited from the many fine tips and logs on MSW.  I put a link to the repair into the "Oops" topic Danny started so those who don't spend a lot of time looking at 20th century fishing schooner logs might have a chance at finding the fix - maybe I'll edit that post with a photo of the damage.

 

It looks like I'll have to think about building up a little stock of something harder than kit-supplied basswood in the future.  My next build is at 1:96, so those small bits are about to get even smaller.  I'll have to trawl the LHS for some boxwood next time I'm there!

 

Bob

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In case I haven't shown this before (in this incarnation of the log) here is the setup I use for mousing hooks.  The secret for me is keeping the connection being moused under tension so I can have both hands free to do the work.  In this case that means putting a thread through the block being moused and clamping the end in a hemostat that is draped over the third hand so gravity will keep the line tight.  The spar is clamped into the Panavise.  Before setting up I tie the mousing line on the hook.  The knot winds up hidden inside the wrapping.

 

post-547-0-35891800-1363627663_thumb.jpg

 

The business end of the previous photo

 

post-547-0-54120700-1363627665_thumb.jpg

 

I then dab a little CA onto the hook, give it a couple of wraps and hold it in place for a minute or so.

 

post-547-0-98185000-1363627675_thumb.jpg

 

Then I take the working end of the thread and put it back through the mouse with a needle and dab with CA again.

 

post-547-0-93454700-1363627677_thumb.jpg

 

After trimming the excess thread, this is the result.  The hook will slide around the eyebolt but it doesn't come off.

 

post-547-0-96028800-1363627679_thumb.jpg

 

There - the block for the main topsail sheet is now attached securely.

 

Bob

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Hey Bob,

 

Sweet work. Really enjoy your detailed "how to" posts.  To me its the heart and soul of the forum. Builders helping builders by sharing the tricks and techniques of a build.  Sad to lose your original log....it was just super. I always enjoy visiting your site.

 

As for me I am slogging along reposting my Sharpie and Sultana logs. 

 

Stay well!

 

Cheers,

Hopeful aka David

 

“there is wisdom in many voices”

 

Completed: Sharpie Schooner (Midwest) Reposting the build log at present

On the bench: Sultana (MSW) Reposting the log and keeping on with the build

 

Next: Lady Nelson (Amati Victory

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Hi Bob,

 

I am constantly looking stuff up in your log, as said above, posting in such detail is a very real help to those of us coming up behind you.

 

I'm looking at getting into the rigging pretty soon and want to get in as many of the finer details as I can. The turnbuckles had me stumped as I couldn't find them for sale in a size I could use (and afford). Then I had the bright idea to use the advanced search feature in MSW 2.0 and there was your log entry on just what I needed !! :)

 

Many thanks!

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Hi Dave and Jim - I like to put out the details of what I am up to.  It may help someone along at some point, or it may generate a comment or suggestion about a better way to do something.  Either way, we all benefit!

 

Not much work in the shipyard lately,  I need to go through each of the spars to see if anthing else can be added at this point, then I am going to ahve to decide on sails - I tend to slow down while chewing over anything this major.

 

Bob

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OK I guess I'd better 'fess up.  I compared the spars against the plans and it looks like I have everything ready to go.  I guess it's time to get off the dime and get moving on sails and rigging.

 

post-547-0-95842900-1365188016_thumb.jpg

 

From front to back:  jumbo jib boom, foremast gaff, foremast boom, mainmast gaff, mainmast boom.

 

Now to decide which of the cloth samples I'm going to use - old pillow case or old sheet.

 

Bob

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Hello Bob

 

I picked up a bluenose kit on ebay a few months back dirt cheap as its missing a bulkhead ( big whoop, its on the blueprints). Anyway I haven't been exploring the bluenose logs much as I kinda still had the Aw shucks, post MSW1 blues.

I decided to check out a few new logs tonight and there was your bluenose on page one. I know I've looked your log over a few times but tonight I took the time to stop and marvel at the spectacular metal work you have scratch built for your Bluenose. I love the history of this fishing vessel made race boat and watching you recreate the detail of all the pieces, brings it more to life.  

I have several ships begging to be next and your log has helped move my Bluenose up the list.

Thank You sharing and then resharing your details. I very much agree with your 3 reason for logging our builds you mention in your 1st post. You have most excellenntly accomplished those ideals.

Edited by themadchemist
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