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Thanks for the kind words, folks.  I guess I'll be heading out to the office supply shop for a mechanical pencil and some #2HB lead - whatever that is!  I'm glad the posts are useful - it's nice to be able to give a little back to this forum for a change.

 

Keith - it's good to hear that you are considering Bluenose for a future build.  She has some really nice lines and goes together pretty well.

 

I hope Captain Walters would be proud - he certainly was an accomplished skipper - to say the least.

 

Bob

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Bob,

 

Nice to see you moving along. Now the real fun begins, rigging.

 

BFN

 

Cheers,

Hopeful aka David

 

“there is wisdom in many voices”

 

Completed: Sharpie Schooner (Midwest) Posted in kit build section of forum

 

Current: Sultana (MSW)

Current: Phantom (MSW)

 

Next: Lady Nelson (Amati Victory)

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Bob,

Good repair. The thin CA works well, I soaked a piece of boxwood for a replacement chock before carving and it worked well. BN builders note, it would be good to harden the ends of the gaff jaws with thin CA (I recommend before drilling) to prevent our breakage. If you ar elooking for sail cloth, I used off white muslin from Amati (thank you Floyd) but found the same material at the fabric store. Look for an off white muslin in the lightest weight they carry. This has worked well for me.

 

We're at the same place, preparing for rigging. Seems like there is too much to do. Ensure all the bits and pieces are on the masts and spars, finish any remaining work on the deck and all around cleaning up. If this is much, wait until our next build (ha!). Keep up the good work 'cause it is looking super.

 

Dave B

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Bob I love your photo of the collection of booms and gaffs.  Your work is coming along well.  I can't wait to see your sails.  Personally I like the idea of the old pillow case.  You can use the old cloth that helped keep you comfortable while you dreamed about sailing around on the Bluenose.

 

Brian

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Thanks for stopping by, Blue Ensign, and for your kind words.  She does have some lovely lines, sometimes I catch myself just sort of staring, and dreaming of being on board.

 

On to the sails - I have to select my cloth.  First up is a piece of fabric that was donated by a quilting friend.

 

post-547-0-83134100-1365539979_thumb.jpg

 

It has some things going for it in my book.  To me, it "feels" right - like miniaturized canvas should feel.  It also seems to have a tighter, more even weave.  And finally, there is more than enough of it to allow for some experimentation and goofs.

 

Second choice - an old pillowcase donated by my sister-in-law.

 

post-547-0-13843200-1365539982_thumb.jpg

 

It is softer than the first sample.  It doesn't have as much "body" to it.  Getting enough of it for a full set of sails would be tight with very little room for error.  I suppose I could ask if she still has the other one.

 

Finally, the two side by side:

 

post-547-0-09095000-1365539984_thumb.jpg

 

Number one is on the left.  I am still thinking about the fishermans sail.  I get the impression that the sail was lowered to the deck to switch sides and I think I know how the head is rigged to accomplish that.  I am still a bit fuzzy on the foot - if it is indeed called the foot (the "tack" maybe?).  If I can work out that detail, I may go ahead and add the sail.

 

Bob

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I found the rigging for the fishermans staysail  in a detail on plan sheet 5 - along with a note that describes how the sail is lowered to the deck to change sides.  I guess I had the right idea, now I just need to execute on it.  The throat halliard runs through a block hooked to the spring stay bail and the tack has a pendant with a fairlead that the throat halliard runs through.  I think I can handle this!  I may become a sailor yet!  There is no indication whether the hook is moused or not.  I think it would be to keep the whole thing from dropping to the deck when working the sail.

 

Bob

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The first material looks like a tighter smaller weave. How are the thicknesses on them. I've snagged several pieces of material that I think will make nice sail cloth.

At the auction the other night I won a stack of these silky thin canvas looking bags. I have no idea what they were for but now they are sail cloth. Expensive though, $1 for the pile ;) .

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Thanks for the info, Russ.  I am going to follow the plans on this one, as I have no contradictory evidence - and few (if any) of the photos on the Nova Scotia archive pages show mast-top detail at all.  I think it's safe to write this one off as a regional difference.

 

Keith - the two materials feel very similar in thickness.  The pillowcase is a little more translucent than the sheet material, another reason for me to go with the sheet.  I nave considered using modelspan, or silkspan, but photos I have seen of those materials seem even more translucent.  My feeling is that opaque is the better way to go here, all else being equal.

 

Bob

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Bob,

Either choice appears to work well. If you are rolling your edge seams, I would use the lighter cloth since the seams will be triple thickness. One of the allowances for scale that we live with I guess. Floyd mentions 1/8 inch single fold, iron on, seam tape but I have yet to find any. Would be heaven if you can. Looking at the Bluenose photos the sails are a bit translucent when backlit by the sun (at lleast the seams stand out). Either way, you won't go wrong.

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Dave - You are taking all the good comments from me before I can get here. :) I found the seam tape at the craft store in Monroe - Ben Franklin's. I might still have some left. Both of you are making a Bluenose that puts mine to shame. Bob you have inspired me. When I get to this point on my Harvey. I will be trying my hand at some metal fittings.

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Hi Dave and Floyd - I made my first step in preparing for the sails.I picked up some HB graphite pencils and a sharpener.  I am not keen on folding over the edge of the sail and sewing because I think the bulge made by triple folding and sewing through it would be too much for the scale.  The plan shows the edging on the sails to be a little less that 1/8", which would scale up to just under 8 inches on the real thing.  I was thinking about getting some 1/4" tape and folding it over the edge so it comes up 1/8" on both sides, but Floyds post has me thinking that if I could find 1/8" iron-on seam tape and just use it on one side, that might be better.  I could also use it for the reef bands.

 

I feel a bit cheated that I have lost all reference to both your logs - in Floyds case, all three logs (the LSS, DDM, and MSW-1 versions).  If either of you were to post details of your experience as a guide, say in the Masting and Rigging forum, I would read them avidly!!! (and I'm sure I wouldn't be the only person interested.)

 

Bob

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Bob,

 

Great to have found your log again! Just getting back to my Bluenose after a couple winters off. Hand surgery for me and the Admiral's PhD dissertation took over the shipyard. You are making excellent progress and I wil read and follow closely for tips and tricks!

 

Jim

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Jim - it's good to hear you are getting back to it.  Sounds like you've had a bit of a rough road - hopefully all is turning to the good now.

 

So no one will think I am slacking completely, I attached the block for the staysail throat halliard to the spring stay bail.  I must remember to keep it on the port side when I get around to attaching the stay, as it belays to a pin on the port side of the foremast saddle.

 

post-547-0-79178600-1366221107_thumb.jpg

 

Bob

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Hi Bob,

 

I just skimmed through your Bluenose build log and am totally amazed at all the minute details that you have built. I've never seen turnbuckles that small. Just magnificent! I'll be following along from now on.

 

Rod

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  • 1 month later...

Hi Rod - sorry for the late acknowledgement but I've been neglecting my log for a while.  Thanks for stopping by and for the kind words.  I have been enjoying your Syren log very much.  If you want to see really small turnbuckles, take a look at DBorgens' Bluenose log - he got them closer to plan size than I managed.

 

While I haven't been doing any hands-on for a while, I have been thinking (and overthinking) about the sails for a while.  I  know I want to try them and that cloth will be my medium.  I think I do not want to sew them so I am looking at drawing the seam lines and using some sort of double-sided tape or iron-on seam binding for the hems.  When I was looking only at the main sail, the 1/4" hem seemed very doable.  Then I looked at the topsails and saw the hem is about 1/8".  Tonight I looked at the jibs (the first sails I scanned to start making templates for) and I see the hem is actually at little less than 1/16" on the plans.  I am less comfortable with with the idea of making hems in that size.  I may just bite the bullet and go oversized.  In any case, I think I'll start with the main sail and fore sail with the largest hem and see how that goes.  After I am more familiar with materials, I may see that doing the smaller hems isn't that big a deal.  Stay tuned - I am moving slowly, but I am still out here.

 

Bob

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Bob,

 

Good to hear from you. I was wondering what happened to your build.

 

Frank Mastini's book "Ship Modeling Simplified" has several pages about sails, mostly discouraging you from building them. It does cover a lot of the extra rigging needed for sails.

 

I am sure not the person to ask about sails but I used to make kites and am quite comfortable around a sewing machine. A 1/4" hem is easy but a 1/16" hem will be tough. That could be less than the distance between the needle and presser foot. You can try running a glue stick down the edge of the cloth and folding against a straight edge or over a stretched thread. A touch with a warm iron will set the glue, or a bit of rubbing alcohol will loosen it. Then stitch through the glued hem.

 

I just posted a photo of my yards at

http://modelshipworld.com/index.php?/topic/440-us-brig-syren-by-rvchima-model-shipways/page-6

The background is a photo backdrop cloth made of thin muslin. To me it looks perfect for sail material.

 

Hopefully someone else will chime in with better suggestions. I am looking forward to seeing your ship under sail!

 

Rod

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  • 4 weeks later...

Hi Bob

 

 Im glad you were able to redo your log. I have been following it for over a year. Your Bluenose looks stunning. I have a question about your deck caulking if you can remember back that far. What did you use for the caulking? Marker or pencil? and one side or both sides of the plank. The caulking is noticeable but not too overpowering. I have been testing to find out what looks the best and I was curious what you did. Thanks for any knowledge you can share in advance.

 

Brad

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Bob If I may jump in here. I remember back when you and I were doing the planking of both of our Bluenoses about the same time. I don't remember what you did. but I did several tests. I found I did not like the looks of the marker it bled too much. I did buy from the Art Crafts store a solid Graphite pencil that was a #4. it was just the right hardness and I have found I like it on several of my models. Also I only mark 1 side of the plank. 

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Hi Bob

 

I have a question about your deck caulking if you can remember back that far. What did you use for the caulking? Marker or pencil? and one side or both sides of the plank.

 

Brad

 

Brad

 

Thanks for the kind words.  I hope the info posted here is useful to others so I it is always good to get some feedback.

 

For the caulking I used a number2 pencil on one side of each plank.  It has held up well over the years since it has been completed.  Once I glued the deck furniture in place I gave the deck a coat of Minwax Wipe-On Poly, the clear satin finish.  If I had it to do over I'd probably go for scale length planks.  Live and learn!

 

Floyd - I haven't checked the Gallery - do you have Bluenose posted there?  Your build came out very well and it deserves to be commemorated there - especially since your DDM and MSW1 logs have gone to the ether.

 

Thanks,

Bob

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Well Bob to be completely honest. That was a learning build. It was my first model that made it all the way without getting near a flame if you know what I mean. I am happy with it. But after seeing your work and the work of others. I decided not to put it in the gallery. I had fun and it was a great learning experience, but I have moved on since then.

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Thank you very much Bob and Floyd for your responses. I have always been amazed at the knowledge that one csn find on this site. I was looking at another log the other day and found out that I should think about the mounting brackets for my bluenose before I get too far along. I never would have thought about that until much later. Im planning to use the pencilfor my caulking also. I have done some tests and like that method the best. Thanks again for the Iinput.

 

Brad

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Brad - another alternative is to build a cradle for the hull instead of mounting on pedestals.  I think that is where I am going with this one, partly because it is a different look, partly because it feels sturdier to me, partly because I waited too long to give any thought to setting up pedestals and the thought of trying to drill holes in the keel at this stage gives me the willies :unsure:

 

Bob

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Bob, good to hear from you again.

Brad, I second Bob's use of a cradle. I too did not learn of providing a nut for the pedestals until my hull was planked. So I will use a cradle as well. Besides it gives us another opportunity to be creative with wood.

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I also needed a cradle for one of my models when the pedestals failed to keep it completely vertical. However, as Bob said it is an opportunity to be creative and produce something in keeping with the model form, which in my case I think I achieved. Depending on the type of ship, another form of support is to set the model as if it is in a dry dock sitting up on the support blocks. This creates a very stable support and can be an interesting option. 

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A cradle is a good idea, that is what came with my bounty launch. Not sure that I have the woodworking tools that would be necessary for building a cradle and do it justice. I am very early in the build having completed the hull planking and will start on the deck planking soon (only a year and a half to get this far lol) so it is still early enough to drill holes for the pedestals, I will have to think about it. Floyd when you say some people put on a nut for the pedestals, where do they attach them, on the inside or the out side of the keel? My plan and its a big one is to set the bluenose under full sail (ambitious at this point in my skill set) so a drydock look would not fit.

 

Thanks again for all the great help and info as it helps everyone.

Brad

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