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18th Century Longboat by CommodoreErie - Model Shipways - Scale 1:48


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So, life stuff kind of got in the way (job search, kid, dog, etc), and I haven't had a chance to start the build just yet. I have, however, been reading ahead in the instructions, and was wondering if anyone had some advice on fairing a hull? Any help on that front would be much appreciated.

 

~CE

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All right, we've begun. First thing I did was lay out the laser cut pieces I'd be needing for the hull.71486869_2350020451720610_1321358671573155840_n.thumb.jpg.01f54f0eecde4686a4c6302e692c1542.jpg

 

Once that was done, I began work on the false keel and keel.

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I used wood glue here, though I'm reasonably certain I could have gotten away with CA glue. In any event, the keel and false keel joining went very smoothly, though I have some (probably unfounded) concerns about the rabbet. I tried to get a decent shot of the joint, pictured below.

 

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So, that out of the way, we're moving to the bulkheads next. My plan there is to mark each of them where the uppermost strake will lay (without looking at the plans, I believe that's 1/8" from the top of the bulkhead, though I could be wrong). Once we get those marked, they'll be placed on the keel. I think I can get away with using wood glue there too, but we'll see.

~CE

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Bulkheads are half done. What I've been doing is marking them 1/16" down from the top, which is where they will need to be filed to later. The practical upshot of doing this now is twofold: for one, it's easier to mark them when they aren't attached, and for two, the line I've drawn makes it easier to see if they're level with each other.

 

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Brief aside, I really should get one of those green hobby grids. I feel that could be useful.

~CE

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What I did when I faired the hull of my 18th Century Longboat was cut up short pieces of 1/2 x 1/2 square dowel and I have rolls of sticky back sandpaper. I wrapped these short lengths of dowels with the various grit sandpapers, and I write in sharpie on the ends what the grit is. Then used those blocks to sand and fair the hull. My understanding was that when you are sanding it down as long as your block you are using is large enough to go across 2-3 bulkheads at a time you will successfully make one faired with the next one in line. With all ships, but this one in particular the bulkheads are so thin take care not to get too carried away and go to fast, you don't want to catch one of the ends of the sanding block on a bulkhead and snap it. 

 

In this photo you can see the blocks of sandpaper I made and the beginning of my longboat. In the second photo you can see my build area as it is now with the rolls of sandpaper hanging off a dowel supported by hooks hanging off the shelf on the wall.

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CE, I used nail file sanding sticks (See my build log link in my signature) that you get from Walmart or a beauty supply store to fair my hull.  You have to have a light touch when you do the fairing.  I would strongly advise that you glue some scrap wood on top of your bulkheads.  This will stiffen up the assembly and prevent the bulkheads from flexing.  I have attached a link to a build log that shows this method.  I wish I had done this on my build as I had bulkheads come loose when I did the fairing process.  Good luck on your build.

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

So, life stuff got in the way, but progress is still being made. 

 

I got the bulkheads pretty well faired (I hope) and decided to sand off the laser burns so I could see the tick marks for the bulkheads better when I get to that point. On that subject, does anyone know how to remove pencil marks from this wood? Erasers and sandpaper don't seem to be working.

 

At the suggestion of Ryland, I did use scrap wood to make a frame, which isn't pretty, but boy is it functional. I still need to put the transom on and mark the ticks for the planks, at which point I'll be enlisting my father in law for advice/help (he's done modeling before: a New Bedford Whaleboat, Charles W. Morgan, and USS Constitution, all Model Shipways).

 

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~CE

 

Edited by CommodoreErie
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  • 2 weeks later...

Small update, after much worrying about getting this right and not screwing up, I got one of the garboard planks on. It didn't slot into the rabbet at the stern as well as I would have liked, though I'm thinking I can correct that with sanding the hull after it's fully planked later. 

 

Thoughts and suggestions appreciated.

 

~CE

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  • 2 weeks later...

I ended up taking the garboard off and trying to sand down the stern some more, though I was limited in my efforts by the bulkheads. 

 

Still I managed to get the garboard on both starboard and larboard, and have the next planks bent and ready to go. 

 

I'm a little concerned about how one of the garboards looks a little indented from the clamps, though I'm hoping that will buff out when I get around to sanding the hull. I'd imagine the color will even out then as well, though this is getting painted anyway, and the garboard won't be noticeable under the floor planks.

 

~CE

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Now we've got the second plank on either side. Took a fair amount of fiddling, but after some light sanding, I think it looks pretty all right. Kind of at a loss where to go from here. I'm thinking the tape method to shape the planks at the bow? Tick strips and me can't seem to get along.

 

~CE

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The soft basswood dents very easily.  Consider putting a scrap piece of wood between the clamp and the plank to prevent damage.  There is only going to be one planking belt so instead of paper tic strips, take thin strips of masking tape and lay them on the frames from the broad strake to the top of the frame.  Decide how many rows of planking you are going to need.  I had ten rows but I did not use the kit-provided planks.  Measure the total length marked on the masking tape and divide by the number of planking rows.  Then, using a caliper, mark out the planking rows directly on the frames.  You will have no need for stealers or drop planks.

 

Looking at the picture above, did you fair the frames enough fore and aft?  This is a picture from my build, showing the amount of sanding required to get a smooth planking run.

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5 hours ago, tlevine said:

The soft basswood dents very easily.  Consider putting a scrap piece of wood between the clamp and the plank to prevent damage.  There is only going to be one planking belt so instead of paper tic strips, take thin strips of masking tape and lay them on the frames from the broad strake to the top of the frame.  Decide how many rows of planking you are going to need.  I had ten rows but I did not use the kit-provided planks.  Measure the total length marked on the masking tape and divide by the number of planking rows.  Then, using a caliper, mark out the planking rows directly on the frames.  You will have no need for stealers or drop planks.

 

Looking at the picture above, did you fair the frames enough fore and aft?  This is a picture from my build, showing the amount of sanding required to get a smooth planking run.

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I'm more concerned at the moment about edge bending the planks. The two I've edge bent so far crumpled a touch (nothing that sanding can't fix), but I can't figure out how to not have that happen.

 

I'm anticipating 12 planks a side.

 

~CE

Edited by CommodoreErie
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I've been working on this day by day. So far we've got 7 planks total on, and we've hit the first on that touches the transom. 

 

For the most part, the planks are pretty flush to each other, minus a very small step here or there, but I figure those will come off with sanding. 

 

Related, wood putty is my friend.

 

~CE

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  • 2 months later...

Been a while. Life kind of caught up with me, combined with having to restart a significant portion of this build due to a planking run I ultimately wasn't satisfied with and a losing battle with CA glue. Thank goodness for replacement parts. 

 

So, here's where we're at. I've got the garboard and broad strake in on both sides, and I'm much happier with the run of the plank this time around. I ended up moving the garboard forward to just touch the upsweep of the stem rather than have it terminate near the scarf joint.

 

Now I just need to figure some math. The instructions say 12 planks per side, but my preliminary estimate has 11 if I want there to be space left at the top of the bulkheads. Maybe I can thin the planks slightly?

 

~CE

 

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That curve looks much better, but watch how far you pushed the garboard forward. You may end up with too much taper on those remaking planks. Don’t forget mark off the hull with tick strips. 
 

I had to plank mine a second time due to an unfortunate tree-nailing incident. Check out Bob F’s log of the longboat for some inspiring work on this project. 
Steve

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 1/15/2020 at 4:18 PM, Tigersteve said:

That curve looks much better, but watch how far you pushed the garboard forward. You may end up with too much taper on those remaking planks. Don’t forget mark off the hull with tick strips. 
 

I had to plank mine a second time due to an unfortunate tree-nailing incident. Check out Bob F’s log of the longboat for some inspiring work on this project. 
Steve

I actually ended up redoing the garboards and taking them back a bit. Not as far back as my first attempt, sort of a halfway point. 

 

I actually was using your build as a guide for that. Here's where I'm at so far.

 

I wanted to get the planks up far enough to attach the transom (thing will not stay on for me) before I started worrying about tick strips. As it stands, I think I'm looking at 11 planks per side.

 

~CE

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  • 2 weeks later...
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  • 4 weeks later...
13 minutes ago, CommodoreErie said:

Being stuck inside all day isn't that bad, as it turns out it gives me more time to work on this. Finally got all the hull planks on. I'm no expert (the exact opposite in fact), but I think it looks passable.

 

~CE

Looks good and I agree that being stuck inside all day isn’t that bad.  I’m making good progress on my projects too as an end result.

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14 hours ago, CommodoreErie said:

Being stuck inside all day isn't that bad, as it turns out it gives me more time to work on this

I've been telling myself the same thing but it sure is a eerily strange time we're going through with this pandemic. You're doing a very nice job on your Longboat. 

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You are doing a good job.  Sanding down the ribs and keel is a challenging job.  When you think that you are finished, then sand some more.  You want to get the ribs real thin.  I did the initial sanding on my Longboat with a rotary tool and finished with hand sanding.  If using a rotary tool, be careful as it would not take much to damage the planking.

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