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Egyptian "Byblos-Ship" trader by Nikiforos - Amati - 1/50th - bash


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Egyptology: The Byblos-ship.

 

or

 

"Do herons quack?"

 

Ruing the scarcity of ancient sea-faring vessel kits in wood, I thought I would try the Egyptian trader vessel (the so-called Byblos-ship) of the early Bronze Age which I could add alongside my 3C BC pentekontoros. Ancient boat models like these are sadly few and far between, despite there being a potential market for them now that PC games like Rome Total War II, Europa Universalis IV, Fields of Glory II and the like have made these boats somewhat familiar this past decade. Oh well, fingers crossed.

 

Amati's 1/50th scale model is ...

 

“ ...from very ancient drawings preserved in the tombs of Aboukir and dating from the reign of the Pharaoh Sahoure (sic).

The fleet of this pharaoh sailed along the coast of Phoenicia (Lebanon), bringing back cedar wood and (...) slaves. The ship (...) has no wooden keel, the function of a spine being performed by an elastic cable under maximum tension (gr: hypozomata). It was twisted by means of a bar inserted between the strands. The structure was reinforced by means of beams in the hold which served as stiffeners.

Although the hull is wooden, it still bears some resemblance in outline to the Nile boats with wicker-work frames. This boat is rigged with a square sail, narrow in proportion to its height, on an inverted V-shaped mast, and propelled by eight oars a side. There are a further six steering oars, three on either side.” (--Herman, Zvi. Peoples, Seas and Ships)."

 

Byblos-Ships have come to mean any sea-going ship as opposed to other water craft. River craft, funeral barges etc.

 

 

20191009_172633.jpg

 

I decided from the outset that it's going to resemble a newly built craft with the natural look of new cedar wood, although either Dibetou or maybe stained Maple will suffice as substitutes, haven't decided yet. I have a huge stock of Maple strip but leaning towards Dibetou, which has a lovely dull ochre hue. Hemp fibre for the copious amount of stitching to be done and linen sail dyed 'tyrian red' because of the proximity of the murex fields in that part of the world, although.... hmm, I may have a surprise coming in the sail department.

 

 

Plano principal.jpg

Things to note:

 

 In the above 3rd party plan view, there are some discrepancies with the Amati plan. 
 1.  The hull is more rounded, the Amati straighter. Amati got it right, more than likely.
 2.  The rudder 'paddles' are larger than the regular ones, and decorated too. Elsewhere, diamond shaped rudder paddles (raddles?) have been noted.
 3. Horizontal deck planking has been roped together in paralleled 'chords'; Amati has them loose? (and with no nails yet invented). I did wonder about this before I found the 'new' plan.
 4. The hypozomata are thicker than Amati's. Let's call it 2.0 mm diam? (Edit: 3mm. 2mm is too skimpy.)
 5. Some kit parts are seemingly of Douglas Fir - never encountered this before in a kit. Nice one!

 

Edit: Amati ignored this rendition and stuck to Lundstrom's instead. See later posts for details. 

 

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Behind the hull plywood is my bashed 1/60th sanbuq (dhow) for size comparison purposes, which might end up in the gallery here one day.

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What's in the box, Nikiforox?

 

String. Mostly. Will replace with existing stock.  A mix of walnut beech and fir, for the structure, and a 0.2mm copper sheet for the fore and aft rope supports.. The plywood is porous enough for a good carpenters' glue to hold, for which I am very grateful. : (

 

Plans and instructions. All very nicely drawn and presented. 


Also, a 13 page illustrated history of Portuguese funerary boats. If you can believe such a thing...

 

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More to follow, where we will look at two trees and their cut wood which will have relevancy.

 

Additionally, I noted elsewhere from bas-reliefs a tripodal mast and twin stern-posts on a similar vessel; the design is attractive and a possible candidate for a conversion here.

 

Aaand finally for now... here's Sahur... eh... Sahure's doctor and his better half. Learn to read english, Nikiforos... May be a candidate design for the sail as I really like thiis simple image.

 

 

Nika

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Clearing up some oddities before we get underway:

 

 

Detalles 1.jpg

If you find one of these on your Sunday bookshop travels...

 

 

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BUY IT. It's about as authoratitive as one gets if you're a galley-nut like Louie da Fly : )

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Above is a multi-plan view featuring those hemp rope chords. Each chord is woven tightly across the latitudinal king plank to its neighbour. So that's another 3 miles of hemp rope to do but I'm concerned that the ship will become 60% tapestry and 40% model.

Notice the lengthier lanyards. 

I'm conscious that back in the 5th Dynasty, these boats were expensive to build and like the (much) later greek pentekontors and such were obviously not Industrially mass-produced and each therefore possibly unique in appearance, however slight. Even though the plans to this Byblos-ship are directly from a bas-relief, who is to say some features are (in)advertantly inaccurate? 


From The Age of The Galley (Conway's History of the Ship):

 

"...There are up to seven oars (sic) on each side although this number may be merely symbolic, the actual number of rowers to a side being greater." 

 

We'll never really know, is the answer.

 

===============================

 

Edit: A little bit of chronology...

 

The Old Kingdom

 

5th Dynasty Pharaohs - Userkaf, Sahure, Isasi, Unas, 2560 -2420 BC.

 

6th Dynasty - Teti and others -2420 - 2270 BC.


Unas is the Pharaoh we're interested in as his are the tripodal Byblos ships I keep banging on about. The Aboukir bipodal bas-reliefs are Sahure's.

 

==============================

One, Two, Tree.

 

Cedrus libani, below, pretty much as per the Lebanese flag (which features a green cedar NEVER a partly brown one seen occasionally. So now you know).

libani.png.8a172f12612d2fff39519f03cfb3f7b7.pngCedrus-Libani-Lebanese-Cedar-480x630.jpg

Note how 'Dibetou-like' the overall colour is. Lebanese cedar is rare nowadays, veneers being produced in France and England. A substitute must be used for Byblos-ship.

 

Ladies and gentlemen, the Byblos-ship could only be manufactured by importing Cedar wood from Phoenician ports, Byblos ( now Jbeil) or Sidon and Tyre.

 

Archaeologists believe Byblos for the 5th and 6th Dynasties had unique preferential status; they call it "the Byblos-run".

1280px-Phoenicia_map-en_svg.png.f8182be7d5f4e708a7848b7eeaaba813.png

 

Egypt had no suitable woods to use and Phoenicia was the nearest source. In general this has been an historic problem for the Gulf peoples too. Omanis had to import proper woods from India to build their dhows, for example, as Tim Severin discovered with his "Sohar" boum replica.

 

Factoid of the day: Phoenicia, Φοινίκη, in Greek roughly equates to 'purple' as a term. Because of the murex farms recorded throughout history which produces that rich Tyrian (Tyre) red/purple dye so beloved by the Roman and 'Byzantine' Emperors.

*

These vessels are well known for importing Ebony from "Punt", which iirc is Ethiopia (not sure). I'm going to simulate a cargo of ebony logs on my build (let's hide some rope mini-game). 

 

ebony.jpg

Ebony or Diospyros mespiliformis -- note the contrast here in some saleable logs, the purple-black heartwood and paler bark.

 

Next time, on we go with drilling and inserting slivers of lime, in that order.

 

Nika

 

 

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Enough ephemeral fluff (for now). Away we go with a quick update.

 

First thing you should probably insist upon is drilling 18 x 0.50 holes, 9 extreme fore and 9 aft in part number 1 of the Amati plans before adding the bulkheads. This for the initial assault of the rope hordes. When done we have a minor issue to fix.

 

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Wim500, in his build:

 

 

...mentions the loose fit everywhere upon assembling the bulkheads. He was right about that. I used spare 0.5mm tilia to make good. The kit may have had a nice reboxing but the keel fit is still left poor with quite a bit of wiggle room.

 

At this point we have a choice to make. The bowels are exposed to allow the mast counterweights (pebbles) to sit side by side. There are some strengetheners to attach here, with its companion hemp which are in turn fitted to bulkheads 7 and 8. I wouldn't mind another exposed section to store some tiny ebony logs in relative security.
I've marked out a possible location in one of these images.

 

So far so enjoyable. Amati have made a fine kit, with the bilingual instructions and uncluttered plan sheet a pleasure to follow. Keep it up, Amati.

 

Until next time!

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The ply is tilia and very soft to work with (above).

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So a small update.

 

Perusing one of the Conway books, this variation, already mentioned, presented itself.

Note well the tripodal mast with attendant ropes and the helmsmen deck, the railings of which are nicely horizontal instead of the Amati plan's tapestry cage. The sternpost is probably a case of artistic license, as I can't see how the sternpost would be superimposed over the railing ... unless there are two of them, which doesn't seem all that likely. Or some sort of arch...

 

Hmm, what do you think? Regardless, I'm going to make this tripodal variant even if it's a later vessel.

 

Nika

 

Edit: the hypozomata (plural of hypozoma; it appears two hypozoma are wrapped around each other for extra strength and the tightening bar is inserted between them) seems to cut through the hull to the keel. So, a lot of liberties taken.

 

 

20191009_212421.jpg

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John, thank you. I'm more into the much later Greek galleys (2000 years apart!) -hemioliai, pentekontoroi, triereis and the like. But anything ancient is super-interesting and under-represented in kit form. And misrepresented. The Amati 'greek bireme' clearly follows the old Heller plastic kits; it's derived from an Imperial Roman bireme design, and that's all there is to say about that unless... Mantua's 'Caesar', which has a lot of (clenches teeth) ...balsa for your £110.

 

Welcome aboard and glad to have you man some ropes... :There are a lot of them : )

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*** UPDATE 

 

Found some real lebanese cedar veneer from 0.6 x 250cm x 15cm which runs from £10.00 per. It should cover all decking detail and harbour area : )

It won't take long to arrive as it's a UK seller. And thats a lot of cedar strip, oh boy.

 

Until then, a nice relaxing paddle job to do this weekend (diamond shaped). Also, unearthed some info on egyptian pottery and AL's Sultan has just the leftover parts we need to make them. Pics tomorrow, thanks for looking.

 

***

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Good work so far, Nikiforos, and I love your attention to historical detail and correcting stuff the kit manufacturers seem to have missed.

 

I'm a scratch-built guy myself, but I agree it would be good if there were more (accurate!) kits out here from ancient and mediaeval periods. Several people on this forum have expressed the same wish - any kit manufacturers out there listening?

 

Steven

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9 hours ago, vossy said:

what is the model name of this vessel? I cant find it for sale anywhere?

 

cheers

 

chris

 

Vossy, goto your favourite stockist's website and just type in 'egyptian' 'nave' or 'sahure' in their search database; "Nave Egizia" should do it, precisely.

Cornwallmodelboats has them for £64 excluding VAT which outrageously comes to £74, with.  CMB restocks Amati products regularly if unavailable; they give ETAs on everything too. Hope this helps.

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3 hours ago, Louie da fly said:

Good work so far, Nikiforos, and I love your attention to historical detail and correcting stuff the kit manufacturers seem to have missed.

 

I'm a scratch-built guy myself, but I agree it would be good if there were more (accurate!) kits out here from ancient and mediaeval periods. Several people on this forum have expressed the same wish - any kit manufacturers out there listening?

 

Steven

Evening, Steven.

 

Well, if you remember SS Portuguese Limbo, one got bogged down with off-tangents, pot-holes and narrative with little to no sawdust. Oho, how young and foolish we (I) were back then!

 

But as you know, newer research comes to light and you have to bring it in to the log as it seems exciting enough to mention. In this case, a brand new paper just fell into my lap and discusses the Byblos Run itself and reveals associated figures of various types of pottery -- which just so happens can be modelled from AL's turned boxwood 'amphorae' deck furniture... sometimes things like this are too opportune to avoid discussing. Its a balance, like so much else in life.

 

Anyroad, 250cm (!) of cedar veneer is on its way, so it's going to be more ephemera and ... painted rudders until it arrives.

 

Exquisite work on the dromon, Stephen. Justinian would hold a Triumph for you...

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Making the rudder paddles. There's a distinguished league of gentlemen here on MSW who have made the manufacture of oars a personal crusade. Robin Lous in his marvelous Bireme build proclaimed modelling miniature oars a "...self-inflicted misery..."

 

We only have 8 rudder paddles to make and 16 ordinary paddles. We can manage that right?

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You may well be thinking, "Is he actually blessing his build with a coloured piece of wood?". Nope, read on, friend, although a blessing might be a good idea.

 

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I went for a diamond shape for the rudderpaddles. Note well, tilia is horrible fuzzy wood in this kit -- dont even mark it with pencil.

 

I decided to replace the stempost with oculus with my pentekontor reject one. The sternpost remains as it's (the ankh) a sacred symbol and we should leave well alone (remember Howard Carter?). I think the heron looks quite nice unpainted. The paddle shafts are made from 2mm Ramin dowel. Lovely wood so it is. By the way, an oculus is an eye painted or made from marble, on the prow. The Greeks made them famous but these 5th Dynasty Byblos-ships had proto-oculi as can be seen in the bas-relief.

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Marking my tilia paddles with ... pencil. What an idiot.

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You'll recall our painted wood earlier. Tyrian red, orange and blue strip just affixed to the paddleruddles. A dot of said red and these two are ready for ... cleaning up... trimming and sanding sealer-ing.  The reverse of the blades will have 4 red dots in that diamond shape, freehand. Painting Ramin is a crime against the Natural Order of Things, so let's not do that although, red gloss.. no. We must stand firm.

 

6 to go and that's that. Next time ... red pottery and a heartwarming tale.

 

Edit: Above are the in-place bulkheads. In the plan, parts 2 and 10 are drawn as identical. In section A thereof however quite clearly aligning with the actual wood cut, 10 is slightly longer. Use section A rather than the generic parts call-out for guidance.

 

Nika.

 

2nd Edit:

 

Those coloured rudder blades looked bloodyawful. Replaced immediately with such painted a very very dark grey. Much better!

 

 

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Welcome Binho and grab a rope! 

 

The kit is outstanding so far (plans and instructions especially so) with the only fly in the ointment being the horrid soft lime plywood. It's not expensive particularly out-of-the-box.

 

Maybe one day, one of these ... but Byblos-ship is fine for now.

 

Regards,

 

 

Ancient-Egyptian-Sailing.jpg

Added two more books to the towers of tomes already present in Nikiforos Castle.

 

Conway's 'The earliest ships' which covers your area of interest as much as it does mine, Binho. And a real treasure -- for one penny on amazon, Prof. Moscati's 'The World of the Phoenicians'. 

 

 

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20 hours ago, Nikiforos said:

Exquisite work on the dromon, Stephen. Justinian would hold a Triumph for you...

Wow! The last person who got one of those was Belisarius! I'm honoured to be in his company . . .

 

Going very well, Nikiforos. I've used ramin many years ago when I was a schoolkid. Nice timber. I'm enjoying following this build.

Steven

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Like the rest in the series, various authors write about their specialisation but collaboratively. From memory (lol), as it's all of one storey above me in Castle Nikiforos (sort of bedridden for a bit) - neolithic types, egyptian, minoan, phoenician, iron age, a nice section on chinese Dragon boats and then northern European development right up your street. This book is actually quite cheap 2nd hand at ama*on co uk exactly now, but you've postage to pay of course.

 

On balance its a title probably more for you than I, but my Lord, such excellence all in one place. A superb series.

 

 

Edit: Its -definitely one for binho; 'celtic' and 'north european' boats seem to fill a lot of pages but a nice dhow section as well : )

 O/ 

 

Best wishes,

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Down and out for a little bit due to 'big C' -related stuff but I have time for a couple of questions to pose for those who understand the structure of -any- seagoing small vessel similar in size and manouverability as Byblos-ship.

 

 

 

 

Questions:

Why would -any- ship require a tripodal mast? Is it needed to support more weight, perhaps in a transition to the more horizontal heavier wider sail we observe in the later egyptian boats (load bearing enough to include limited human travel across the yards)? (we cannot see much from this small image -the remainder of it in Conway's yields no clues). Such a technological leap forward here seems doubtful -we're talking about the very early Dynasties -i.e. Pharaoh Sahure. Perhaps extra support because of weather/seaworthiness issues? Feeling beyond puzzled about this whole tripod thingy honestly!

 

How would this arrangement look compared to the standard bipodal drawn plans, as it ascends towards the mast head?

 

Lastly, I see tensioning bars at the lower mast in the grapevine heavy rope affair, exactly as per a hypozoma. What would tensioning bars be doing exactly at that location? And why is only the lower mast to be tensioned as the hemp doubles back on itself exactly there?

 

Thank you, if anyone has any ideas or proposals.

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Part of Amati's illustrations (for discussion purposes only!) showing how a bipodal mast operates in the original kit.

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Quack. (Do herons quack?)

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13 hours ago, Nikiforos said:

Why would -any- ship require a tripodal mast? Is it needed to support more weight, perhaps in a transition to the more horizontal heavier wider sail we observe in the later egyptian boats (load bearing enough to include limited human travel across the yards)? (we cannot see much from this small image -the remainder of it in Conway's yields no clues). Such a technological leap forward here seems doubtful -we're talking about the very early Dynasties -i.e. Pharaoh Sahure. Perhaps extra support because of weather/seaworthiness issues? Feeling beyond puzzled about this whole tripod thingy honestly!

 

How would this arrangement look compared to the standard bipodal drawn plans, as it ascends towards the mast head?

 

Lastly, I see tensioning bars at the lower mast in the grapevine heavy rope affair, exactly as per a hypozoma. What would tensioning bars be doing exactly at that location? And why is only the lower mast to be tensioned as the hemp doubles back on itself exactly there?

 

Hi Nikiforos. Do youknow where that pic of the tripod mast comes from? I googled ancient egyptian ship bas relief but I haven't been able to find the original anywhere, the only ones I've found have been either single or bipod masts. In fact,  finding any photographs of the original bas-reliefs of Egyptian ships meets with very little success - you mostly get drawings of them, which could have added inaccuracies, above and beyond those the original Ancient artists may have perpetrated.

 

However, if this is an accurate rendition of the original, I can't off the top of my head think of a good reason for a tripod mast except to add strength, but it seems very awkward, and the only thing I can think of for the tensioning ropes and bars is to "weld" the three masts into one structural unit, also for strength. (Those twirly rope things would also hold the mast down into the mast step, so it doesn't lift off under anti-gravity and fly into the air . .  . )

 

There are two tensioning bars for each outer mast; the upper right-hand one goes in front of the outer mast and behind the central one, which is totally ok; but the lower goes behind both right-hand and central mast, and the two left-hand bars both seem to go behind both left-hand and central masts. To my eye, there's nothing keeping these three from just unwinding again. If, say, the lower right hand bar had gone in front of the outside mast and behind the middle mast it would have balanced the forces acting via the upper one, and equally I'd have expected the left-hand pair to do the same sort of thing, perhaps in reverse. Is this detail correct, or is it a mistake by the copyist, or by the carver of the bas-relief?

 

The heavy cross-bar at the top of the twirly ropes seems to be for tying the three masts together; certainly, the twirly rope on the right goes around it and the right-hand mast, tying them together. But the left-hand one doesn't go around the cross-bar, just the mast, and as far as I can see that wouldn't achieve anything structural. Again, is the discrepancy artist error, or is it accurate?

 

Perhaps the central "mast" is nothing of the sort, and is shorter than the other two (if only we had the top of the picture!)

 

There are some apparent similarities with the mast reinforcements/wedges in the mediaeval Spanish ships of the Cantigas de Santa Maria, where there is a central mast reinforced by lashing to posts either side - maybe the "tripod" mast is the same sort of thing, but with two actual masts and one central post?

 

image.png.d3e147238961dc78cb8815e40ea938c2.png

 

By the way, apparently herons don't quack, they sound like this - 

 

Steven

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Well then. A demonstration of what makes this forum -and especially its members- such a gold mine. Not merely sawdust but gold dust, as it were.

 

Stephen thank you for the assist; I've an extra thought about this fascinating image which in brief is arguably about captivity AND/OR religious practice. One of them has no relevancy, the other does, but another red herring is of course possible. The figures on deck aren't celebrating The Bangles reaching No. 1 with "Walk like an Egyptian", they're captive slaves. Will write more about your learned observations when feeling less wretched but suffice to say, I'm accepting your interpretation of a short stumpy middle strengethener and will model it in. It j7st makes simple, sound, sense.

 

Oh and my 8 feet of Lebanese Cedar veneer arrived. Sorting it slowly into 'scale' strip and 'overscale' strip; either of <4mm and 'looks silly'. The kit plywood to be traced directly onto homogenous parts of the veneer where appropriate. What is odd is that tilia plywood forms the actual visible hull exterior. I think Amati wants us to stain it, but we can do better.

By the way, 8 feet isnt that much when you consider my dhow took 8 metres of Niove wood (4mm width but including wastage and another gorgeous wood species) to finish its decking. (Good Lord..).

 

Thank you Stephen, his heron and those who offer upvotes and support. Later!

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Cedrus libani. Smells fantastic too. 

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Getting the fully cedar deck done (I don't have any Acacia...) I'm using the guidance below which is not Amati's plan, to stay true to the original model of Byblos-ship -by one Dr. Sotas, apparently.

 

As mentioned, some of the deck planks need diagonal stitching too, which Amati omits.

 

Nika

 

 

Plano principal.jpg

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There appears not to be any planking at all beneath the 'helsmens' feet.

 

 

 

Detalles 2.jpg

I think this design is too rounded for a Bronze Age boat, so I choose to go with Amati's more linear pointier plan. Originally, we have a side profile only, in a tomb in Aboukir; so it's a 50/50 toss of a coin.

Again, none of these images are part of the plans to Amati's kit. They are in the public domain.

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Bit of a small update.

 

The inner supports, eventually trussed up, are of plywood, visible on completion of the model. Let's cover the obvious with cedar. They're then ready for 55 feet of rope.

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It's dark in here...

 

Found a model of the original interpreted design. Note the immediate differences.

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Is covering the bottom of the ship and oars with a black resin, Greek style, something probable in circa 2500 BC (5th dynasty) ? Or mutton fat and vegetable oil smeared over as still is common with the dying breed of dhow craftsmen (white-ish colour)?  Sheep are TIMELESS, I tell you.

 

Lots to think about.

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Edit: First deck planking done. There's that overlay of thin 0.6mm grid to lay down on top, then the stitched 'chords'.

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I'm aware that the grain is overscale but nothing can be done about it other than start a grove of bonsai cedar. Overall, it has that genuine cedar 'warm' colouration and Dibetou wouldn't have been quite the same. In no way would I have used the kit's walnut, its just too dark a hue in the supplied wood. I'm happy with the appearance of the veneer, overscale or not.

trussgirdle.jpg

My ship will be mast down too. I believe the 'unknown' deck objects that perplex Mr. Landstrom merely keeps the unhooked sail secured. They have weight and handy rope loops, evidently.

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So this book is considered to be the definitive work on all of this. It was written in 1970.

Specifically for the Byblos ship it looks like Amati used it as Gospel; the above image and plan views for the rounder hull is incorrectly interpreted (inasmuch as everything flows from Aboukir's 'line-drawings'.

 

Except:

According to Landstrom, his drawings remove the planked 'grid' on deck AND the latitudinal stitched 'chords'. I could only read the book for a short time, at the owner's house, and the asking price for the title is way over my budget but one that was the obvious visual clarification.

Furthermore --

There are no paddle 'supports' either; Amati got that one too.

There IS planking for the 'helsmen' as per Amati.

The hull shape is narrow because it fared better in open seas (not verbatim). Amati correct.

There is a bottom yard for the sail. Yardless, per se, not seen until the Late Kingdom, it is suggested.

Hypozomata used as a single hogging truss (he makes a case for an additional lower zig-zag one, but my time ran out and it wasn't apparent on his drawing). 

 

Edit: he means the zigzag girdle, as in 'hull's side stitching', not the truss.

 

Amati omitted some 'inconclusive' deck objects that befuddled Landstrom. Fair enough.

There appears at Aboukir religious paraphernalia  beneath the sternpost. An urn or small altar or the like.

 

As for my chosen tripodal masted ship, nothing much changes here despite the less detailed bas-relief. Stephen's suggestion of a simple strengthener is what I choose here for ma boat. The grapevine coils are to 'tie down' slaves and transported cargoes in addition; that's my theory, come what may!

 

So today is tidying up the deck, drilling some holes there and not fitting that grid after all. Then the planking of the hull itself in lovely cedar wood.

 

Nika

51wadZ+iWFL._SX373_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

 

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Note anchor on foredeck of the leftmost Byblos Ship.

 

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Resurrected the rear planking.

 

Everything in cedar, because frankly the lime sheet attracts pencil marks and fingerprints it is so porous; loose wet and dry sandpaper dust will ruin the visible hull's appearance as well. 

Top tip: DOUBLE PLANK THE HULL. 0.6 at most. It's my only severe criticism of this kit so far.

 

Nika

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It is at this point that we must decide whether to open up another section of the hull in order to reveal a space to place those ebony logs. But there is supposition that all wares were simply carried on deck. But, too, there are drawings of a sort of katafrakta (centrally planked walkway) type hull, in Lindstrom's book - limited beneath-deck storage space a possibility? I think it doubtful as the guts of these ships could have been horribly fragile and expensive wares worth good money but clearly I haven't the expertise of Mr. Landstrom or his judgment.

 

That noted, how projections like his are made from bas-relief side profiles with no other archeological material or model finds, are beyond me, frankly, but I'm just a poor boy from a poor family. 

Easy come, easy go.

 

So to recap this stuff in the hope of streamlining the log, let's say there are three interpretations of the Byblos Ship we can base our model upon. 

 

 1.  Dr. Sotas' rounder hull rendition.
 2.  Mr. Landstrom's extrapolations to include the lack of deck bracing, the sharper hull and even a deck-house or tent in one drawing.
 3.  Amati's version which is very close to Landstrom's.

 

Well, it has to be 2 with a nod to 3 by default, obviously. Not to say 1 is wrong as variations must have existed in the day. So...

 

 1.  Rear deck planking present.
 2. No oar upright supports.
 3.  Sharper hull shape (praise be)
 4. Slightly different truss girdle fore and aft.
 5. Bare deck. But see 7.
 6. Anchor. 
 7. Deck-house? Tempted... See image below.
 8. Lower yard included.
 9.  Remember Howard Carter.

 

But primarily using the tripodal ship image as an overarching template. 

Phew. All clear now, hopefully. I'll put all my sources at the very end of this log for future Byblos-fanciers.

More shortly.

20191022_110705.jpg

Saqqarah_Ounas_08c.jpg

Not that it matters a great deal but the tripodals are from Pharaoh Unas' burial site. Still 5th Dynasty.

Edited by Nikiforos
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It’s interesting to read through your working process! I’m earning about a ship type I wasn’t familiar with. Good work, and that cedar veneer looks very nice!

 

I was researching more about egyptian ships online and I found this article you might find interesting: https://www.britishmuseum.org/PDF/Ward.pdf

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