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captain_hook

Attaching rope to blocks.

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This is a rigging beginner question, but I‘m going to despair on that. I have searched in different books and the internet but no technique seems to be accurate. I‘m searching for an adequate and universal way to attach cotton rope to wooden blocks. Shall I use knots (I.e. overhand) or some sort of splice and seizing? What is the best and more scale way for a model ship for rigging blocks?
 

My best guess has been to lay the rope around the block, twisted both parts of the rope, put a drop of ca glue on the twisting and secured that with a thin (gutermann 50) cotton threat seizing around. A photo is attached.
 

Any better suggestions would be highly appreciated.

 

Best regards,

Andreas

D8F225E9-1FF9-47F9-830D-9A4B5E313BF8.jpeg

Edited by captain_hook

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I think you are on the right track..  

 

I really like the method shown here by Dubz..:

 

Rigging by Dubz

 

While he is showing attaching a line to a block that is already stropped, I think the same method could well be used for stropping the block..

 

Edited by Gregory

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Thank you, this is an option I haven‘t thought of before. But it is also very time consuming. I‘m looking for generic technique that involves only the block and the rope that I want to attach onto it. Any suggestions? Thank you for the feedback.

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Thank you for that, that is very useful for simulating a strop. But I also need some more informations for blocks attached to tackles. Here is a picture of a contemporary model. The blocks shown (running rigging) don‘t seem to be connected to the rope by knots but by twisting the rope or some sort of splicing. The diameter of the connection only slightly larger than the rope itself.

AE4427C2-5633-4D76-9154-51F0556234B5.jpeg

Edited by captain_hook

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Here's an easy method and it is similar to how I do them, and the video is easier than me trying to explain it. Should give you the look you want.

 

A key aspect in my opinion is using finer diameter seizing thread than shown in the video to help keep things in scale.

 

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nzDl5MYOgmQ

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It also depends on the scale: what os acceptable ar 1:100 might be rather unsightly at 1:24 scale.

 

at large scales you will need to strop the block, and splice the rope into the strop.

at 1:100 you can gake a lot of things, without creating visual problems (unless you are a purist,than you have to strop at 1:100)

 

After much trial an error I landed at : rope around block, half hitch under the blick to secure the block in place, and a seizing to fix the running end. Fix with diluted white glue (which makes sure it holds, but can bevremoved when really necessary)

 

Works easy, quick, and the result looks fine to me :)

 

Jan

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IMG_9781.JPG.e038492e27ca315d3739f94199b7d4e6.JPG66AD59B7-C6C5-4487-9748-E397936E80D2.jpeg.554e280498d3727a74d918e021670de6.jpeg

Two pics from my build: the long tackle block is secured with a half hitch, and two seizings : the first pic is just after making the seizings, the second in the final (and due to loooong building times, somewhat dusty) state.

fir reference: block is 5.5  mm, serving thread is gutermann machine tarn from the shop around the corner.


Jan

Edited by amateur

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I think there are two questions mingled together: 1) how was it done on the prototype and 2) how to represent this on the model.

 

First one has to work out for the given period and the given type of ship and for the location of the block, how it would have been attached and whether the strop might have been served. Some blocks have a strop with an eye and a hook, other blocks may have tail, etc.

 

How to represent this, depends on the scale, as was already said. However, blocks are (almost) never attached with knots. Usually splices are used. Splices can be mocked even at very small scales by pulling the thread twice through itself and then stabilising it with a drop of varnish (preferable over PVA or CA cement, as it can be dissolved with the appropriate solvent).

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My method of false spice is to unravel the line for a little way, tease out the yarns on a flat surface, then cut them on a long diagonal. Take the line around the block, put a dab of white glue on the frayed end, then pinch and twirl the frayed end against the line at the end of the block to create a tapered false splice. It takes a few tries to master the technique, but gives good results quickly.

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Thank you very much, that helps a lot. 
 

@druxey: I don‘t want to bother you but may I ask you if you have a picture of the completed false splice? My visual perception may be more effective than my literal understanding (and my english vocabulary). Else I will try and post a picture of my tryouts. Thanks again.

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Thanks for sharing Joe and Druxey.  A key point, IMHO, is that Druxey mentions use of white glue.  It works perfectly and does not leave a hard and brittle finish which CA, as Joe shows, will do.  Both methods look really good to me, just not a fan of super glue, especially on rigging.

Thanks again to both of you.

Allan

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