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mtdoramike

Typhoon by mtdoramike - FINISHED - Dumas - here we go again

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I decided to use strip wood as recommended on the stern and stem posts. But I decided to soak the planks, shape them slightly and applied them while wet. I then used a heat gun to dry out the planks, which help keep their shape. There  was only slight splintering on a few edges, which will be sanded down anyway. I also laid a planking strip down the center of the bottom of the hull, to hide the plywood keel and give it a more finished look even though it will be painted. I also used a little bondo on the top of the front deck where I noticed a little dip on one side of the deck. It would have stuck out like a sore thumb once the final planking was done had I not fixed it and leveled it off with the bondo. 

 

If I were to build this boat again, I would put the built up stern and stem posts on BEFORE the planking of the final side planking where the planking could have been feathered into the posts rather than having to cut and trim both stern and stem and get the posts applied and look proper.

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I did a little bit more work on the spear by applying the center mahogany strip as well as the top separation strips. I made up a little jig, soaked the planking in hot water with a little dish washing soap to help make the planking a bit more pliable for an hour then placed the wet planking in the jig and took a heat gun to dry out the planks in order to get the curve needed. This made the job a bit easier. She is looking a little rough at the moment, but soon her beauty will shine through.  

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I started applying the planking to the top decks. The instructions give several options for applying the deck planking from leaving a space between the planks to using thread as caulking. I'm doing my own thing and using some thin box wood planking strips that I cut down to put between the planking. I think it's going to work beautifully.    

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Nice work on the deck planking Mike. I was not successful in my attempt at that. Can I ask you what you used for the seat cushions. In the kit I am working on they provide plain balsa to use for them and I wanted to add some seam details so they look more realistic. Yours look great. Thanks.

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The seats for the Dumas Typhoon come with pre-molded seats in plastic. Which kit are you building that supplies balsa wood to make the seats out of ? 

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I am building the Dumas Chris Craft 1938 27' Triple Barrel Back, which is a scale of 1/24.

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I saw your build log, she is coming together nicely. It would be fairly easy to carve the seats out of balsa using a Dremel tool, even making the pleats.

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One thing I know for sure, If I were to ever build this model again, I would not use the supplied 1/8" mahogany strips and would opt to use 1/4" wood planking strips for the top deck. The 1/8" strips take for ever to apply. The only way I would do the 1/4" strips again would be if I were building the Typhoon for a client, but if I were just building for something to do or to sell, I would opt for the bigger planks.

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OK, I have the top deck planked, now to plank the hatch covers. The instructions indicate planking the top deck with full planks and then cutting them at all the openings later. I tried that and after applying two planks, it started looking like a snake because it was so difficult to keep the planks tight. So I ripped them off and decided to plank it in sections. Now to see how the planks will line up with the hatch cover planking. Keep your fingers crossed.  

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Just played catch up on your double ended pointy thingy Mike. Great looking work so far. Unlike some of the other comments I don't think of this design as a motored canoe but more like a single float for a seaplane.

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Thanks CD and Lou, the shape of the Typhoon is starting to grow on me...…..a little bit anyway. I'm quite happy with the added rear hatch, I was wondering how it was going to turn out since it was a modification, but I think it turned out quite well. 

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Your boat is going to be a real beauty when it's finished, Mike, and it's nice to see a boat like this being built here on MSW.

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Thanks Tom and Bob, it's now on to sanding, sanding and just when you think it's time to start the glassing, more sanding. Unfortunately, I have not found any easier way to sand these mahogany run about boats other than hand sanding. 

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I put a coat of resin on the deck and hatch covers to see how it would look. I decided to put a coat of stain on the deck, which made the caulking strips more subdued and not stick out like a sore thumb. I like this look better. Yes, I actually do clean my work area every now and then. But like I tell my wife, "don't go fallen in love with that clean look, because it won't last very long" hahahaha 

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No real updates, just laying fiberglass on the Phoon. This process is not an easy one, due to the shape of the boat. Im sure if your an expert at glassing you could probably find some fun in this process, but im not expert at it. So its one of the least enjoyable parts of the build for me. So i chose to lay the cloth in sections like bottom section first, then the sides, overlapping the seams. 

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It's jumping ahead, but this boat is really going to pop once you start putting on all that beautiful hardware.

 

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4 hours ago, CDW said:

What cloth weight are you using?

I'm using 2oz cloth on her, it's a bit easier to work with than the 4oz I was looking at, it drapes better and takes corners a bit more forgiving. I also looked at both 3/4oz cloth (way to thin) and also 1 1/2oz. both of which I have from other builds. But I settled on the 2oz which seemed to work the best for the extra rigidity and easier to drape. You have to bare in mind that the entire hull is balsa sub-planking with 2mm mahogany finished planking. So any help adding to the rigidity of the hull, the better. But by the time I'm

done with her, you can drop her off a building and it shouldn't leak or break with a good 3-4 coats of resin. I usually put on 4 coats sanding in-between coats with 400-600 wet/dry black sand paper, first dry then wet sanding.    

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4 hours ago, CDW said:

It's jumping ahead, but this boat is really going to pop once you start putting on all that beautiful hardware.

 

It will, but right now it's looking like a step child that only a mother could love. Here is a picture to prove it.hahahahaha 

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12 hours ago, mtdoramike said:

It will, but right now it's looking like a step child that only a mother could love.

😂😂😂 

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Speaking as an old time RC builder, with a lot of glassed hulls under my belt, they all have to go through the Ugly Duckling stage before the swan emerges.  (Don't let too many people see that mask. They will accuse you of hording and not turning it over to the hospitals!):D:ph34r:

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I still have some sanding and another coat or two of resin to apply. But she is starting to take shape. I was wearing my dust mask outside while sanding and my neighbor yelled out asking if I had the virus hahahaha. I said yep, I got the cooties and I'm contagious so stay away from me.🤭

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Well I took two steps forward and three steps backward today. I checked the weather this afternoon and temp was going to be in the upper 80's here, no rain and humidity around 57% around noon time. So I figured I would lay the finishing clear coat on the Typhoon, which I did and then set it out under my carport area to dry. I checked on it a few hours later when I noticed the wind had picked up. Yep, just as I suspected, the wind blew in dust and dirt, which caused the Typhoon to now feel like sand paper. I didn't think to check the wind because when I started and up until finishing, there was no wind. Back to wet sanding AGAIN! @##$%*)(*&%##%&!     

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Just now, mtdoramike said:

Well I took two steps forward and three steps backward today. I checked the weather this afternoon and temp was going to be in the upper 80's here, no rain and humidity around 57% around noon time. So I figured I would lay the finishing clear coat on the Typhoon, which I did and then set it out under my carport area to dry. I checked on it a few hours later when I noticed the wind had picked up. Yep, just as I suspected, the wind blew in dust and dirt, which caused the Typhoon to now feel like sand paper. I didn't think to check the wind because when I started and up until finishing, there was no wind. Back to wet sanding AGAIN! @##$%*)(*&%##%&!     

Oh man, I can't 'like' that. I feel for you.

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