Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Hi all,

 

Very happy to be here and introduce myself. I’m Robert, from Belgium. I’ve been a modeller for most of my younger years, working with plastic models (airspace and armor). Even then, while roaming the model shops I’d look up at the wooden kits and thought: “someday”.

 

Lately, my interest in model construction sparked again, and this time the notion of wooden modelling was clearly set in my mind. After doing a lot of renovations in my house, I’ve come to love the material, it’s flexibility , it’s relative ease of handling and the looks.

 

Contrary to years ago, a lot of information is readily available, so I started roaming the web for anything I could find, studying build logs on this site and viewing countless Youtube videos. I realise seeing something done and doing it yourself are two completely different things, but this gave me a hint of the challenges before me, and a lot of tips and techniques. I’m cautious by nature, so I like to get informed as much as possible before diving in.

 

After looking at a lot of kits, I’ve become interested in buying a kit from Occre:

 

  • “Widely” available in Belgium (meaning in stock at the closest store)
  • Their wood quality seems to be ok, from what I read from reviews
  • They provide detailed plans with lots of visual aids
  • They provide complete video build logs of certain ships which were very helpful in finding out the specific challenges for each model.

 

I read the “Cautionary Tale” post here, so I was thinking of finding a model that was not too difficult to make, but on the other hand would provide me with the necessary material to learn the techniques necessary. Planking and rigging look to me as the biggest hurdles.

 

So after all this, I narrowed down my selection to 3 Occre models: HMS Beagle, HMS Terror and the Buccaneer.

 

HMS Beagle: seems straightforward, but rigging seems very complicated compared to the other two

 

HMS Terror: rigging a bit simpler, but the extra difficulty of having to attach the metal plating to the bow, as well as the specific white zone around the ship (sorry, don’t know the nautical term)

 

Buccaneer: smaller than the other two, hull seems to be more complex to plank. Specific geometric design is also a challenge I think.

 

Building in earnest is probably going to start in December/January, I’ll set up a dedicated build log then, but I’d like your expert opinions about my possible model choice. Any hints or tips are very much appreciated. Thnx in advance!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, JToma said:

Welcome to MSW Robert :piratebo5:

I think the HMS Terror would be a good choice.

Thnx for the welcome! May I ask why the Terror? Something I overlooked?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not a recommendation,  just a comment:

My background is in the Biological Sciences, and HMS Beagle has a role similar to an icon. Beagle had been a will-o'-the-wisp as a subject for a model until 1997.  Then it became my first choice to build after retirement because Karl Heinz Marquardt authored an Anatomy Of The Ship volume covering HMS Beagle.   I scratch build and have been able to loft the framing for this ship, using the information and plans in the book.  I even have the necessary stock of framing wood.  I have long  been diverted from building Beagle.  I have decided to use 1:60 as the scale for all of the ships that I model.  I have a "rule" against modeling a ship that is available as a kit.   Sort of like the on going mission of the Starship Enterprise: "to go where....".  This new OcCre kit - at 1:60 - has provided me with a bit of a dilemma.  Being POF it would not be mistaken for the kit, but still...  OK, enough irrelevant rambling!

The AOTS volume - while possibly difficult to buy - is probably also the basis of the kit.  It also provides information that allows for an extraordinary level of detail - if you so choose.  In addition the information and level of detail for the spars, rigging and sails is extensive and is matched by only a few other vessels.   If the rigging gives you pause, the kit plus the book provides enough information  that an y impediment will be at the level of your effort and not due to a lack of information.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
40 minutes ago, bruce d said:

Welcome to MSW, it is a great place.

Thank you! I was hanging around here for some time, reading up on build logs. Amazed at the support that is given here, glad to see that 🙂

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Jaager said:

Not a recommendation,  just a comment:

My background is in the Biological Sciences, and HMS Beagle has a role similar to an icon. Beagle had been a will-o'-the-wisp as a subject for a model until 1997.  Then it became my first choice to build after retirement because Karl Heinz Marquardt authored an Anatomy Of The Ship volume covering HMS Beagle.   I scratch build and have been able to loft the framing for this ship, using the information and plans in the book.  I even have the necessary stock of framing wood.  I have long  been diverted from building Beagle.  I have decided to use 1:60 as the scale for all of the ships that I model.  I have a "rule" against modeling a ship that is available as a kit.   Sort of like the on going mission of the Starship Enterprise: "to go where....".  This new OcCre kit - at 1:60 - has provided me with a bit of a dilemma.  Being POF it would not be mistaken for the kit, but still...  OK, enough irrelevant rambling!

The AOTS volume - while possibly difficult to buy - is probably also the basis of the kit.  It also provides information that allows for an extraordinary level of detail - if you so choose.  In addition the information and level of detail for the spars, rigging and sails is extensive and is matched by only a few other vessels.   If the rigging gives you pause, the kit plus the book provides enough information  that an y impediment will be at the level of your effort and not due to a lack of information.

Thank you for the comments and the tip. In all honesty I was a bit hesitant registering as I realise historical accuracy is an important element of what you are all pursuing. Not sure I can go that far for my first build, As I want to focus on developing the skillset needed to tackle a build. I hope that's ok with everyone. I want to make sure I get the basics right before moving on to bigger things. Good to know though there is a lot of info out there for the Beagle, it will definitely stay on the build Wishlist 🙂

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, ObviousNewbie said:

In all honesty I was a bit hesitant registering as I realise historical accuracy is an important element of what you are all pursuing.

Historical accuracy is something that some of our members are pursuing, but not necessarily all of them. Some of them just like to put kits together, regardless of whether it represents an actual ship. We welcome both kinds.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi all,

 

Thanks to all for the warm welcome. Continuing my research before plunging in, I have a question about glue. From what I've learned, 3 types of glue are commonly used: white (wood) glue, contact-based glue and quick setting glue, each with their own benefits of course (please correct me if I'm wrong in my assumptions).

 

Question for white glue: how long does it take to set?Is it easily removable when it's still running?

Question for contact glue: I saw a false deck being planked using this technique, does the glue not cause the plank to bend?

 

Also, I noticed glue is applied to painted surfaces and then joined. In my days working with plastic, this was a nono as the glue only stuck the paint together and not the plastic itself. I assume times have changed?

 

Similar question regarding plank bending. I've seen a number of techniques used, from dedicated electric tools to soldering irons, to plank benders or just draped over a paint can! Is the choice between these options a matter of personal preference or are there other benefits involved?

 

Sorry if these are basic questions, but as said I'm new here and personally I think using Youtube as a sole research resource is risky 🙂

 

Thnx in advance!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/28/2019 at 11:03 PM, JToma said:

Welcome to MSW Robert :piratebo5:

I think the HMS Terror would be a good choice.

Hi Jeff, Terror is indeed my favourite, I'd just like to understand your advice more in detail. Is it the hull shape? The overall difficulty?

 

Thnx in advance for clarifying 🙂

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, ObviousNewbie said:

3 types of glue are commonly used: white (wood) glue, contact-based glue and quick setting glue, each with their own benefits of course

This is not exactly the lay of the land.   My view of it is that there are more than 3 types.  I do not use 2 of the 3 that you have listed.

Contact glue/cement - here Weldwood is the common brand - has zero place on an actual ship model.  I use it to fix sanding media (cloth backed) to the Maple drum of my homemade thickness sander - difficult and messy to remove. 

CA -  do not use it - probably a generational thing - but when I did try it, I never got much use from a bottle before it dried up.  Depending on brand and conditions, if want a model to last a hundred or more years and not just 20 or so,  the long term stability is open to question.  

PVA -  comes four main flavors - white - OK, but I do not favor it,  yellow - carpenter's glue  I use the water resistant Titebond II brand,  brownish - fully water proof = Titebond III (really acidic),  archival white - bookbinders neutral pH - safe for rigging lines made from natural fibers ie. linen or cotton.

Epoxy  -  many types -  the bond for metal to wood

Hide glue - really traditional - not used much -  the liquid variety is in disfavor because of its high water content (probably).  The glue pot type is messy and time consuming.  Fully archival.

 

Before it sets, PVA squeeze out is easy to remove - scrape it or damp paper towel - once set  a very sharp edge - it is a plastic.   Undoing a bond - near 100% isopropyl alcohol  and a heat gun.

 

6 hours ago, ObviousNewbie said:

I noticed glue is applied to painted surfaces and then joined

Are you sure it was not wood that had been dyed?  A wood dye penetrates wood and does not affect its pores or surface.  A stain is really semi transparent paint and it is pointless and bit mad to use PVA on a painted or stained surface.

 

Wood bending?  The tools to do it?  You pays your money and you takes your chances,   Whatever works for you.  The most important factor here is your choice of wood species to try to bend to begin with.  A few bend well,  most sorta do, and some resist bending to a degree that makes it not worth even trying.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What Jaager said is essentially it.  I've not had to use heat yet with the alcohol to separate PVA glued pieces.  But there's always a first time.

 

For the bending.. it's a matter of preference and what works for you.  The mechanical type that look like a pair of pliers are, in my opinion, a waste of money.  They achieve the bend by crushing the wood fibers.    I use an old curling iron.  Soak the wood for a bit, put to the hot iron and bend.  When the bend gets "stiff" while bending, back in the water for a bit.  Best bet it try the soaking and using the coffee paint can, or curling iron (get your own or buy a new one for the admiral (wife) and take her old one.  I think the soldering irons get too hot but that's me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I chose the HMS Terror as my first build...

I find it challenging but not to the point of frustration.

Of course, I am not finished but I have completed the hull and many of the deck fixtures. I am currently installing the the rat line pillars. So, the rigging is still an unknown for me but I am looking forward to it. 

I think the best thing about OcCre and many of their models, is the videos that take you step-by-step through the build. Regardless of how you intend to build a model, these videos can help you figure out the rough patches! I believe the Beagle has the same videos too.

Good luck and make sure you include some progress pictures once you get started!

Here is a few of mine... for inspiration!

 

 

IMG_2938.jpg

IMG_2936.jpg

IMG_2935.jpg

IMG_2913.jpg

IMG_2914.jpg

IMG_2910.jpg

IMG_2912.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

About us

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research

SSL Secured

Your security is important for us so this Website is SSL-Secured

NRG Mailing Address

Nautical Research Guild
237 South Lincoln Street
Westmont IL, 60559-1917

About the NRG

If you enjoy building ship models that are historically accurate as well as beautiful, then The Nautical Research Guild (NRG) is just right for you.

The Guild is a non-profit educational organization whose mission is to “Advance Ship Modeling Through Research”. We provide support to our members in their efforts to raise the quality of their model ships.

The Nautical Research Guild has published our world-renowned quarterly magazine, The Nautical Research Journal, since 1955. The pages of the Journal are full of articles by accomplished ship modelers who show you how they create those exquisite details on their models, and by maritime historians who show you the correct details to build. The Journal is available in both print and digital editions. Go to the NRG web site (www.thenrg.org) to download a complimentary digital copy of the Journal. The NRG also publishes plan sets, books and compilations of back issues of the Journal and the former Ships in Scale and Model Ship Builder magazines.

Our Emblem

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research
×
×
  • Create New...