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As i have stated before - I am a RUBBISH painter - but I am trying hard to improve.

 

Can anyone advise on best brands of masking tape and any tips on methods of use ( best widths for specific jobs etc)

 

Tamiya I have always noted as strongly recommended but I see  Stuk Professional being suggested recently

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I use tamiya or pactra masking tape, so far they have been absolutely the best I have used.

 

Best widths for jobs,  I am not really sure what to say as I kind of wing it based on the job at hand.  One tip however is to "seal" the tape.

 

Once you apply the tape run along the edges of the tape either with a thin coat of clear, or a thin coat of the the undercolor if you are painting over something.  The helps seal any tiny gaps in the tape you may not be able to see.   You may not see them, but that paint will attract to them something fierce and run up and under.   So if you seal it off, no more runs.    Thin coat though, too thick and you will peel it off as you lift the tape  :o

 

 

-Adam

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I used to always use standard Sellotape (clear) - but have been converted to the Tamiya tape - perfect amount of tack and nice clean edges.

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Ahoy Mates :D

 

On my plastics I used Future Floor Finish to seal the Tamiya tape and prevent bleeding. It provided a good seal with a very thin coat and no brush marks. I have not yet tried it on my wooden models but am approaching the point where I will need something.

 

Has anyone used this on wood.  

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If Chris says Tamiya - the oracle has spoken.  

 

How are your good lady and yourself Chris ?

 

Regards

 

 Steve

Thank you! - although when looking at some of the build logs on here, I see myself as decidedly average, if I'm honest.

 

We are fine, thank you - she doesn't even seem to mind a 64th scale victory on the dining room table...

 

And back on topic - I used copious amounts of the Tamiya masking tape for the black and yellow strips on the sides of the hull - you soon go through it when using over 6 meters per side...

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Tamiya masking tape

i have found this the best so far, differerent sizes are available, but i tend to use the 4 or 6mm for hull banding lines, as it is flexible enough to wrap around things that get in the way

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I also used Tamiya some 100 years ago or so   :P - but I try to avoid painting as much as possible because I am hopeless in it.

Anyhow, there is a very good trick which I read I think on MSW 1.0. After applying the masking tape you have to put a coat with the same colour as the paint underneath (what you want to over-paint with another colour). After this first coat dried, apply the requested colour. This trick completely prevents the seeping, because even if the first coat would seep we can't see it as it is the same colour, As the first coat dries it completely seals the gap so there is no possibility of seeping afterwards. And, as an additional advantage, this way you don't have to brandish the masking tape so hard and it will not pull the base colour off as you remove it.

Janos

what a clever idea

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Ah ha - all good info.

 

My big worry is painting against a varnish finished hull area but i think a version of the "pre-seal " approaches should work fine.

 

Thanks all.

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I have always used Tamiya tape useualy 6mm  ,best i have used, try and paint away from the tape and you should have no problem getting a clean edge.

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Frog Tape. It has a special coating along the edges that help to prevent bleeding. Once this edge is cut it is no different than blue tape.

 

Here is an experiment I did with three kinds of tape (I wished that I had included the Tamiya tape. Picture 1 shows the three tapes on a piece of scrap baswood that had not been sanded. After I hand painted some black acrylic over the bare areas I peeled the tape off.

The Frog Tape (green) had its edge cut on the bottom, but the top edge was 'as is'.

post-246-0-51810300-1368814201.jpg  post-246-0-59767800-1368814214_thumb.jpg

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Having built plastic models (planes, ships, etc.) for many years now, I have used all sorts of masking tape. Doing WWII German splinter camo requires good tape! For me, I found that the blue masking tape (low tack) available at any of the home building stores (don't remember the brand off of the top of my head). I just burnish it at the edges and have never had any bleed through!

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My name is Jan, and new to MSW.  So here it goes, just hope I an pressing the right buttons. 

Currently building the "We're Here" form Bluejacket.  This is the second ship, with the first 

being The Grand Bank Dory, again from Bluejacket. I bought the paint kit which contains the 

Floquil paints.  Just finished painting the hull using the black and box car red paint. I am about

ready to work on the water line 1/16 inch wide white stripe.  Does any one have suggestions on

the best way to do this?

Jan

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With wood, especially walnut I found the tape may take a thin layer with it unless you are careful. I found that if I fold the tape back on its self while peeling, it is less likely to take any surface wood with it.

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The kit plans likely will have 1 profile view of the ship that's at the actual scale size of the completed model and usually there is a waterline marked on this plan. If you have a T-square, mark a line on the plans that intersects the bottom of the keel at least at 1 point and that is parallel to the waterline. Measure up from the base line to the waterline. Also take measurements from the baseline to the keel bottom at a couple of points if your entire keel is not parallel to the entire baseline. If you have a keel clamp or etc., put the boat in the clamp. Make sure the clamp is level. Then adjust your keel so that its distances to the top edge of the clamp are the same as those from baseline you drew on the plans to the keel. The top edge essentially now is your real world baseline. Then get the measurement from the surface of you work area top edge of the clamp. Add this distance to the plan baseline-waterline distance. That number will equal the height that you'll set point of your waterline marker to. Check to make sure your marker is hitting in the same spots as those shown on the plan (the rudder area is a good place to look for comparisons). Once you're happy with everything, then slowly draw the line. After the line is marked, either add or subtract a1/16" to your marker tip and then draw this line. Then mask off the edges of the lines (I like Tamiya tape :) ).

 

Hope this all made sense--pictures are better!

 

Jay

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All good advice. However, if you can plan to pre-paint as much as possible before assembling, that can help a lot!

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Druxey thank for the suggestion I will remember that.  

It seems that most builder suggest using Tamiya Tape.  Today I went to 3 different hardware stores and there are lot brands of masking tape.

I am having a hard time finding Tamiya tape.  Will I find it at a hardware store or where?

Jan

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Jan, Hobby Lobby sometimes stocks it, but call--most good independent hobby stores that sell models usually stock it, too. I use both Tamiya's 6 and 18mm tapes--I like their 6mm for doing waterlines. I use Tamiya for the waterline and then expand from that tape with blue painter's tape on top of part of the Tamiya along with painter's masking paper (I use an airbrush for my painting).

 

I shot the white, lower half of the WL first and now I'm shooting the darker upper half second:

 

post-4129-0-47164300-1379548238_thumb.jpg

 

Tamiya 6mm tape is in the picture & you can see the completed WL here:

 

post-4129-0-04161300-1379548842_thumb.jpg

 

Here I'm shooting a bulwark, but you can see the tape types and paper:

 

post-4129-0-92120100-1379548338_thumb.jpg

 

Jay

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J. Maitri

Thank for the information.  You have answered many questions I have had.  I just looked at your Bounty Jolly Boat. 

Your photos and the way you documented the sequence of the problems and there solutions show a real educational teaching

skill.

Jan  

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Jan, glad I could be of help and thank you very much for your kind words! Would love to see pictures of your We're Here build--maybe you'll consider posting a build log? :)

 

Jay

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Jan,

 

Another alternative to painting a stripe for the waterline is to use Chart tape which is available in a variety of widths and colors.

 

I used the white 1/16" on my Bluenose II which i finished in the late 80's and it has never yellowed nor come loose.  

I did cover the entire hull with clear acrylic matte paint once it was completed.

 

You can find chart tapes in stationary stores (Office Depot), craft stores, as well as on-line.

 

I have no affiliation with the company.

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Bogeygolpher

When I am working on the We're Here I focus the attention from the ship to the golf course in the back yard and the alligator swimming by. 

My wife and don't play golf, but we do call the alligator CRUISER.  With all that my lines don't quite come out straight but I am having fun. 

I have be thinking along your line of using 1/16 tape for the water line.  I am not sure if the ship wright authorities will through me in with 

Cruiser.

Thank some much for you suggestion.

Jan

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One more thought.  

 

If you are reluctant to leave the chart tape in place, you may want to use it as a guide for applying masking tape for painting.  Sounds confusing but it is not.  Place the 1/16" chart tape exactly where the waterline is supposed to be. Place masking tape on each side of the chart tape.  Remove the chart tape and you are left with a 1/16" wide space with masking tape on each side ready for painting using the suggested techniques to ensure the tape is sealed at the edges.

 

Don't let Cruiser know where I live, I have enough trouble with my golf game and the alligators we already have on the course.

 

Enjoy your build.

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Bogeygolpher

 Thanks for you two suggestions.  I just came back form a Naples Ship Modelers meeting and unanimously agreed to you first technique.

You have been a great help.  I will soon start a building log, when learning what buttons to push.

Just remember never smile at a crocodile. 

Jan

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3M Fine Line Tape is my preferred masking tape with Tamiya a close second.  The 3M stuff comes in many widths so curves can be worked quite well.

Just remember that regardless of the tape used remove it as soon as possible - the longer any tape stays on the more it sticks.

Kurt

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