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DocBlake

Bench Top 5" Disk Sander

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I've known about the difference in speed from inboard to outboard and that may solve a few problems. But for my needs it still doesn't handle most of the issues that a variable speed sander would.  Don't get me wrong....I own the Byrnes sander and I love it. His tools are by FAR the best...Moab

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I been using mine for while now. It's been good to have a sander that works with small stuff. I like the stick-on sanding disks because there's no give to them.

 

I'm using the finest grit that came with the unit (240 I think). I don't expect to use anything coarser so I won't be changing often. I did buy a cleaning stick from Amazon last week which works really well.

 

Not surprisingly, the markings for the horizontal and vertical angles are poor. So I've used a square and made some jigs to get this right.

 

I've been making some elm pumps out of 1/16" x 1/8" boxwood.

image.png.5b39166651e9e29d67f909593b30ddf1.png

These are each made from 6 pieces. I now need to see if I can get 8 strips for an octagonal version. Before I can do that I need to make a jig to narrow each piece to 1/16" x 3/32". I could of course make them from a single square piece and just sand the corners but where would the fun be in that 😀.

 

I'm sure the Brynes sander is better but I'm saving up for the table saw first.

 

Richard

 

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I've had my Performax sander for almost 2 years now and bought it at Menards on one of their 11% rebates.  Right now for those in the US, menards.com has them on sale for $39.99 with free shipping to a menards store.

They are great for ship building!  Other's have posted that it has a clamp so you can clamp it to the bench, others state that it has two speeds but in fact it is variable speed, and others state the sandpaper is easy to replace with stick on sandpapers.  One thing I haven't seen from anyone's post is that this unit has an exhaust port that you can hook up a vac to.  I use this in my den and never heard anything from the wife about this causing dust everywhere.  For the price, it works for me in a pinch.  As the character from Godfather's Pizza would say..... "Do it"

 

 

Edited by Daliab

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On 2/15/2020 at 3:08 AM, Bob Blarney said:

There is something else that you might consider.

 

While the motor RPM are constant, the paper's surface velocity (inches/min) - and therefore the sanding rate - is greatest at the outer edge of the disc (5" x pi x RPM).  As a piece of stock is moved towards the center of the disc, the surface velocity drops, and becomes zero at the dead center of the disc.  So it is possible to alter the rate of sanding by positioning the piece.

 

Another example of my not thinking of the obvious. Is there a SIMPLE way of compensating for this when sanding a wide part - without eyeballing?

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4 hours ago, stuglo said:

Another example of my not thinking of the obvious. Is there a SIMPLE way of compensating for this when sanding a wide part - without eyeballing?

Unfortunately, it would be difficult with such a small sander.  An alternative would be a strip sander, or a drill press 'Robo-sander'  

 

However, upon closer inspection of the pictures from the Menards ad, I don't see a bump on the motor's case that indicates the presence of a starter capacitor.  Thus the motor can possibly (likely)  be regulated with an inexpensive 'router' speed controller, available at Menards or Harbor Freight for less than $20.

https://www.menards.com/main/tools/power-tools/routers/router-speed-control/80820/p-1444421810442-c-10087.htm

Also, a good place to buy abrasives is Klingspor's woodworking store.  Here's a 50 disc sampler ranging from 60-400 grit (5 of each grit)

https://www.woodworkingshop.com/product/sam5x8/  
 

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5 hours ago, stuglo said:

Another example of my not thinking of the obvious. Is there a SIMPLE way of compensating for this when sanding a wide part - without eyeballing?

I have had a  good quality 12" disc sander for decades. This large disc size is very useful but I have learned not to use it for wide pieces except for rough-sizing. I too would welcome any advice that shows how to get a good result on wider pieces (but I think the right answer is 'don't do it').

 

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Don't know, how you guys use your disc-sander, but normally one moves the work-piece along the disc to avoid scratching marks. So you can work on pieces at least twice as wide as the table of the sander. Of course, if you use the protractor, then there may be further limitations.

 

Otherwise, you might need to look into belt-sanders.

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5 hours ago, wefalck said:

Don't know, how you guys use your disc-sander, but normally one moves the work-piece along the disc to avoid scratching marks. So you can work on pieces at least twice as wide as the table of the sander. Of course, if you use the protractor, then there may be further limitations.

 

Otherwise, you might need to look into belt-sanders.

Or a vertical strip sander

But the sander that I use most is this one. by far.  It's possible to make accessory fixtures that accommodate many needs.  

https://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGID-Oscillating-Edge-Belt-Spindle-Sander-EB4424/100061671

 

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2 minutes ago, Bob Blarney said:

Or a vertical strip sander

But the sander that I use most is this one. by far.  The belt mechanism can be removed and spindle sanding sleeves installed, from 1/2" to 2" in diameter.  It's also possible to make accessory fixtures that accommodate many needs.  

 

RIDGID Oscillating Edge/Belt Spindle Sander

https://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGID-Oscillating-Edge-Belt-Spindle-Sander-EB4424/100061671

image.png.d6b72d06d019e00febc19696fb4791a2.png

Quote

 

 

Edited by Bob Blarney

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A strip sander can be very useful, not only for your hobby.  I used mine to sharpen knives, chisels, and plane irons yesterday - scalpel sharp.  You can buy a 'knifemaking kit' at woodworkingshop.com for about $40 that includes a large selection of belts and a few other items.

 

A tune-up and maybe a couple of easy modifications might be a good idea.  There is guy who sharpens kitchen knives for a living using these, and he has made a couple of videos about how he tunes his strip sanders.    One particular thing he mentions is belt speed, and it may be worth the extra $20 to buy the variable speed RIKON 1in. x 30in. Belt / 6in. Disc Sander.    Another alternative is the standard combo 4x36 belt sander  & 6" disc sander.   

The cutlery guy reviewed several 1x30 machines here, bearing in mind that he use them for cutlery sharpening:

 

 

Edited by Bob Blarney

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