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RPaul

Display pedestals with different heights?

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Hi Folks

Probably the wrong forum for this one, but there isn't one with a 100% match.

I want to mount a recently built 1:64 Bluenose on a proper stand. At the moment it's on a kit cradle.

The trouble is, the keel is at an angle to the waterline, so to keep the waterline horizontal, the pedestals need to be of different heights. The ones I've seen for sale off the shelf tend to be the taller, the thicker, I.e., they are basically bigger or smaller in all dimensions, whereas I would prefer the same diameter and profile, but taller (probably the very top part longer). In the past I've placed one (wooden) pedestal on a wooden spacer, but it's not ideal; besides, I would prefer brass.

What would you suggest? There are plenty of ships like this out there; surely someone has worked out a solution?

A slipway is one, but I don't want a slipway in this particular case.

 

Thanks!

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A brass pedestal can be cut down to the desired height using something like a Dremel cut off wheel.

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The problem is inherent in "one size fits all" "off the shelf" parts. You don't mention the style of your pedestals. Are the essentially "cradles," or are they "posts?" Not everything needed can be bought pre-made. Go your own way and make some of your own. One simple solution are mounting posts, which make for easy adjustments when setting up on a base, although drilling holes and putting in blocking as necessary on a hollow hull are problematic if not attended to while building the model. "Cradle" stands are fairly easy to adjust by removing material at the bottom or on the bearing surfaces, or by shimming in the same way, but appearance suffers.

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I had the same problem with Badger 1777. I decide on trying dried driftwood. I found a piece which sort of branched and had the right contour to match the angle I needed and was stable in this position. There were two areas where it would be in contact with the model.  I then cut a channel to match the keel in each of these two areas. When I was happy with it, I put a very small screw up through the driftwood and into keel. ( See Badger model folder in Scratch build gallery if interested although the solitary picture of it only partially shows the pedestal.)

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Very much depends upon how much difference in height over what spacing.

If not much then  doing a bit of jiggery pokery with the keel slots and the base can work .

One solution I came up with was to buy different sizes of brass doorknob and do a bit of sawing = takng the Knob off and using the stems

HANDLES

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If you have a small hobby lathe for metal, turn your own pedestals.  If not, check around there are hobbyists and even some small shops that will turn them.  

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You might check with Model Expo - they used to sell 2 different sizes of brass pedestals  to mount ships with an angled keel.  I don`t know if they still have them or not.

 

Mark

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Like mtaylor suggested a small lathe to turn metal if you want to stick with brass or a wood lathe for wood. In my build log for the 18th Century Longboat, I turned my own wooden pedestals out of walnut and then using a combination of a dremel and some files, I cut the grooves out for the keel to sit in.

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Display pedestals can be made from commercial turnings for lamps. Also, for a model like you have with a lot of drag (slope to the keel) you might consider using one pedestal forward with the aft end secured directly to the base.

 

Roger

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I mounted my Benjamin W Latham (similar profile to the Bluenose)  using 2 walnut blocks with the same cross section but different heights. 

1C1304E2-D399-4E59-9808-AFAA34FAAE65.jpeg

Edited by ragove
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