Jump to content

Recommended Posts

It won't be long and I'll be painting the hull of my Bluenose build.

 

While spray painting would be much quicker, easier and provide a nice finish, I'm thinking of brushing the hull. Anyone who has seen the hulls of wooden ships can attest to the fact that the paint jobs are pretty rough looking. Large brush strokes are very noticeable.

 

So I'm looking for some tips and clues on the best way to paint such large areas with acrylic paints.

 

Does the entire hull need to be done all at once or can I stop and resume at a later time? 

 

Should the paint be thinned more that usual and plan on 2 coats?

 

I would think paint extender is a must?

 

How large a brush to use?

 

Any advice would be much appreciated.

 

Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Personally, I am not very fond of brush-painting acrylics for a couple of reasons:

 

- one has to work very fast, as acrylics dry very fast, in order to avoid brush-streaks

- acrylics remain slightly rubbery for a very long time, days, if not weeks; until they are not thoroughly hardened, it is difficult to sand them

- one would need to paint the surface in one go, as quickly as possible and without interruptions, i.e. wet in wet.

 

I am not an expert in high-quality brush-painting, but one of the techniques/strategies is to rub run down the layers of paint and then to repolish the last one to the shine desired. This is very difficult to do with acrylics for the said reasons. The brush size really depends on the size of the surface you want to paint.

 

So, today, as air-brush equipment will cost you probably less than a meal for two in a good restaurant (depends on where you are living, of course), there is hardly a reason not to use spray-painting. And for this, acrylics are ideal.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For myself, I tend to brush paint acrylics.  It works well for me, but I learned to paint by painting 28mm war gaming miniatures.  I use the exact same techniques on my ship models as everything else.

 

I’m not trying to make my models look new and shiny though, I try and make them look battered, used, and old.  It looks more real to me that way.

 

I typically basecoat dark and then work to lighter colors.  I usually ink (use thin downed paint, almost watery) and then dry brush to give depth to my models.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I brush acrylic paint all the time and have never sprayed. I use the cheapest of cheap paints and get excellent results. The secret is to thin the paint, almost 50/50 and to apply several coats. The picture is showing my galley hull which has at least 8-9 coats. Also be sure to have all surfaces sanded very smooth, I seal the surfaces first using wipe on poly then sand smooth again before applying paint.  Occasionally I will sand lightly between coats of paint if required. It is best to paint the entire hull, at least one side, and try to keep a wet edge at all times. Thin Thin coats is the main thing to remember, and to be patient.IMG_2564.thumb.JPG.2a41b36a550483ba0cb78047fefdeded.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the tip Don, I believe I'll try your method when I reach the point of painting the hull. Any further tips you can pass on paint bleed? My Bluenose has a 2 color hull separated by a white stripe waterline.

 

Getting a crisp paint line is important to me and the thinner paint may tend to bleed under tape. Perhaps the coat of wipe on poly id the trick?

 

Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dave,

Once the surface is sanded perfectly smooth, draw the line and paint the first color, the lighter shade first.  This first color should actually go past the line.  Then redraw the line if necessary and a lay down a tape along the line.  Next, put on a coat by spray, or by hand,  a clear varnish, clear nail polish,  or similar along the tape edge to seal it.  Once this clear coat is dry, it will prevent t  bleeding and wicking under the tape when you paint on the second color.  Paint at an angle but away from the edge of the tape so you are not forcing paint into the seam.  Again, be sure the surface is absolutely free of bumps and dings so there is no open gap between the tape and wood before sealing and then painting.    If there is to be a thin (1/8", 1/4" or similar) white or other color stripe between the two main colors, automobile pin striping tape works very well.  Once in place, clear coats over the finished hull will protect the tape.   I used the pin striping on the model of the schooner Columbia  and it shows no sign of ill effects after ten years aboard a cruise ship.  

Allan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Allen, thanks so much for the the clear and precise instructions. This newbie needs all the help he can get. Your instructions clear up many questions and will make my first hull paint job much easier.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Dave

 

The Bluenose was my second ship, so I was far from experienced when building it. While I hand brushed the black above the waterline, I used spray paint for the red lower portion. I taped off everything but the target area, put it in a cardboard box, and sprayed it outside from a spray can. I did three coats and lightly sanded after the first two. Not only did it turn out great IMO, I have had several compliments on. Just a thought. If you'd like, I will take a few pics and send you if you PM me.

 

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

About us

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research

SSL Secured

Your security is important for us so this Website is SSL-Secured

NRG Mailing Address

Nautical Research Guild
237 South Lincoln Street
Westmont IL, 60559-1917

About the NRG

If you enjoy building ship models that are historically accurate as well as beautiful, then The Nautical Research Guild (NRG) is just right for you.

The Guild is a non-profit educational organization whose mission is to “Advance Ship Modeling Through Research”. We provide support to our members in their efforts to raise the quality of their model ships.

The Nautical Research Guild has published our world-renowned quarterly magazine, The Nautical Research Journal, since 1955. The pages of the Journal are full of articles by accomplished ship modelers who show you how they create those exquisite details on their models, and by maritime historians who show you the correct details to build. The Journal is available in both print and digital editions. Go to the NRG web site (www.thenrg.org) to download a complimentary digital copy of the Journal. The NRG also publishes plan sets, books and compilations of back issues of the Journal and the former Ships in Scale and Model Ship Builder magazines.

Our Emblem

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research
×
×
  • Create New...