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Hi Mark:

 

This is the MicroMark saw....I tried attaching the blade guard but installing it the way it suggests in the instructions results in it not sitting right and just mucking things up.....I thought I was doing it wrong somehow, but I tried several different things with no success....so I'm binning it too!! The saw still works fine, though I'm starting to see the need for some of the wing-dings advertised to go with it.....

hamilton

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Thanks Jim - saw your response after responding to Mark - to my eyes, the blade guard does not seem to be assembled correctly in order to fit properly....the illustrations in the instructions present it differently than it actually is.....and in the demo video on the Micro-Mark site the guard is already installed (looking right) so there's no way of telling if they just had a bad production run on these things or if there's a trick to installing it that I'm missing....anyway, it still seems to cut wood without it so I'm not complaining too much....

hamilton

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I just brought home my Grandfather's toolbox.  It spent its professional career at the Philadelphia Naval Ship Yard, where he worked as a pattern maker.  For the last 40 years it has lived in several basements of family members, and now will be used, once again, for shipbuilding. (Although smaller scale ships this time around.)  The wood is mahogany, it was made by my Grandfather, and it is in need of restoration.  I'll leave it alone for a while to acclimate, then see what can be done.  DSC00653.thumb.JPG.fb68ce363dcba55f4462fd35f67948c4.JPGDSC00651.thumb.JPG.0bf92edaccf61f52d27ee69f547fc51b.JPG

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If that was indeed your grandfathers, then it may have historical value and I would not refinish it. If something is broken then maybe minimal repairs but that's all.Refinishing may ruin its historical value. Its a beautiful piece. I love cool boxes anyway and that definitely is one. Reminds me of the story of grandpas axe. My dad replaced the head and I replaced the handle but it WAS my grandpas axe.

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Beautiful box.

When I was growing up in the 1950's, my Grandfather had a hardware wholesale/retail business with a very complete section devoted to brass hardware as seen on that box. I recall going through and picking out hardware pieces for shop class projects in junior high school. If I had only know what those old brass hardware items would be worth today and how hard they would have been to find, I would have saved them. I remember back then, so much of that stuff just sat on the shelves all dusty because people stopped buying it. When the business was sold, probably most of that type of thing went to scrap yards. 

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Thank you for the likes and comments! 

CDW:  I have a cigar box full of that hardware, but have been saving that for my own box project one day. 

Bill:  It is definitely my Grandfather's.  I carried it out of his basement when I was a teenager.  It was passed from my Uncle to his sons and back.  So now I have it.  That's his name on the nameplate and it even has his Pattern Makers' League membership card in a drawer.  (Dues were $3.33 a month in 1950)  I don't think there is any actual historical value to the box, just family value. (I'm guessing just like your Granpa's axe).  Still, I'll sit and ponder things for a while. 

 

This box has a sister toolbox, which went to my Mother.  It is maple, and has always been kept in the house, and has faired much better over the years.  Its not as large or fancy, but is also a wonderful piece of craftsmanship.  I think the true value will be when I reach into a drawer, pull out a tool, and shape a piece of wood for a ship, just as my Grandfather did.  Its the connection to family long gone that makes me proud to have this.

 

-John

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Bill

Don't know if this is helpful or not.

The Skuldelev Ships #3 - Vikingeskib - Viking Ship (Roskilde Fjord)
 

It appears that this is the first model of the Skuldelev ship #3 that Billing made from the actual layout of the wreck of the original ship, later to be replaced by a smaller scale version of a full scale reproduction of the same ship named "Roar Ege" #703.

The real vessel was discovered in 1957 and recovered in 1962 The model appears to have been sold  from the mid 1960's to early 70's. 
This version when complete should be a total of 26" long, compared to the 22 1/2" of the later model "Roar Ege"

 

Hope that is of some help.

 

Lou

 

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2 hours ago, EJ_L said:

Another book to add to the ever growing library. I really enjoyed Lavery's The Ship of the Line and have been wanting to get this one as well so when that Barnes and Noble coupon made an appearance in my email, I had to click buy now. :D

 

Book 1.jpg

Out of the 4 of them I really like this one the best.

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  • 3 weeks later...

WP_20170927_09_33_49_Pro.thumb.jpg.824f1159dcf6b8c3a492ab7de2467d99.jpg

 

Early christmas time...ordered the book two weeks ago, but 'had' to go a short holiday to Athens with the admiral, so no time to pick it up at the mail center.

What an amazing book! And a true bargain on top of that as I payed 18 euros for it :)

 

Hopefully the monograph about L'Amarante will arrive next week...good times, I tell ya.

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image.thumb.jpeg.422d1365a3667bac6a1012ddb97cf76e.jpegThis past Sarurday I spoke on "Engineering of the Whaleback Ships" at the annual fundraiser for the SS Meteor, the last of the Great Lakes whaleback barges and steamships.  Before leaving I placed a bid on a handsome print being auctioned off and was notified later that it was mine.

 

It is a limited edition print by Scottish maritime artist John Kelly now living in California.  It shows a steamship loading cargo from lighters.  London ?  Hong Kong?

 

 

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On 9/8/2017 at 6:43 PM, EJ_L said:

Another book to add to the ever growing library. I really enjoyed Lavery's The Ship of the Line and have been wanting to get this one as well so when that Barnes and Noble coupon made an appearance in my email, I had to click buy now. :D

 

Book 1.jpg

I love the fact that they put the contemporary model of Winchelsea on the cover.   I have some hi res images of those and they are fabulous.   Cant wait to get back to work on her again next week.

 

Chuck  

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Got a few things over the last week, four books, and more parts containers.

 

First, the boat related items. A nice book on Chesapeake Bay sailing craft, and 40 small "Eye Shadow" jars with a fitted box. I bought the jars as a fill-in to get the free shipping. They will be quite useful, and they only cost me $5 after the regular shipping charges are subtracted. A plus, was the box they came in. When I bought some larger jars a few months ago, for the same reason, I had to make a box.

 

Book_01.thumb.JPG.c0779e281b87f320016b64a7d3475413.JPG

The other three books are for another passion of mine Dinosaurs! It has been quite a while since I purchased any books on this subject for monitary reasons, so I'm planning on enjoying them! Now if only someone would publish a new book on Carnivorous dinos, or bird/dino evolution (that I could afford).

 

Book_02.thumb.JPG.73c80a48aaf585ec5a548ff937179f29.JPG

 

I also purchased a "4TB" external drive that was on sale at Best Buy. Glad it was on sale, as it only actually holds 3.6TB! It is fast with the USB 3 port, though.

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A drive that is specified as a 500 Gbyte actually contains 500.000.000.000 bytes, and a byte isn't 1000 kbytes

Each manufacturer divide the spec for a Gb disk three times by 1000 to show the value in Gbytes, but that's not accurate

1 Gbyte = 1024 Mbyte,
1 Mbyte = 1024 Kbyte
1 Kbyte = 1024 byte

thus

500.000.000.000 byte / 1024 = 488.281.250 Kbyte
88.281.250 Kbyte / 1024 = . . . 476.837 Mbyte
476.837 Mbyte / 1024 = . . . . . . 465 Gbyte

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Carl is right !  Remember it is a binary numbering system, so it is 2 raised to the n-th power - or 2 raised to the 10th power = 1024, which is represent as 1K (kilobyte), 2 raised to the 32nd power is 4,294,967,296 or 4 Gigabytes.  Everyone assumes, incorrectly, that it is decimal (base 10).

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I received my second build today. I won an auction on e-bay for a complete AL Bluenose II kit for $39.00 and the seller only lives 5 miles from me so I got it already and did not pay any shipping. I also downloaded and printed John Earls series of articles from SoS magazine  ( I made the cover and bound it).

 

After going through the kit and checking it against the parts list I can see that there will be lots of room for improvements and bashing in general. But I figure for what I paid for it any lessons I can learn here will pay dividends on my next build. Don't misunderstand me I am still going to take my time and make every effort to make a presentable job of it.

 

I will post a build log at the appropriate time. for now I have a small airplane to finish in the next couple of days then I need to research and build a decent keel board/clamp.

20171011_192246.jpg

20171011_192305.jpg

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