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What did you receive today?

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I treated myself to a honing guide from Richard Kell (http://richardkell.co.uk/honingECom.htm). The guide is beautifully made, to very fine tolerances (third of a thou). The only slight drawback is that for the very smallest chisels the blade doesn't project far enough to get the right honing angle. Should be a simple matter to make a little holder to compensate. However I must confess I like tools such as this for their aesthetic qualities as much as for their practicality.

IMG_1098.thumb.JPG.6de81339a346ebc554ff02c991f456b1.JPG

 

 

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On 12/23/2019 at 9:50 PM, lmagna said:

Better be careful David. This is how the closet full of hoarded kits starts out! As evidenced by that lonely hanger.:D

I gutted that room  and turned it in the modeling room anyways so it’s ok!  Another Midwest kit showed up today, it’s one I’m looking forward to but want to get a little more skilled first...I have quite a few to practice on lol.AEBB6BF1-C34C-44A9-BA3E-4907CA5E6267.thumb.jpeg.b4fdcce85984769e2bff29e182e8cdb3.jpeg

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I found that the upper quill clamp that holds the top of the blade had a makeshift repair, At some time in the past, the movable jaw had fallen out, and been replaced with a flat piece of bar stock. I could have lived with this, perhaps, but I did not like the idea. I looked on Ebay and found the lower clamp assembly for a reasonable price, and thought that I might use that jaw in the upper assembly. After ordering it, though, I found an entire upper quill assembly, also quite reasonably, so decided to get it too.

 

I received both parts, and the new quill looks to be in much better shape, so I'll keep the original and the new lower clamp, as spares.

 

The new and old quills. The duller one is the original. The second picture shows a view of the jaws, and you can see the substandard replacement in the old quill, on the right. The replacement jaw does not fit quite right, and has a tendancy to fall out. The movable jaw on the original part is captured by the set screw.

 

Quill_01.thumb.JPG.56b3e2b1858150b6d38f70de5e729cb9.JPG

 

 

 

Quill_02.thumb.JPG.e92f2c1404bbd380b6cdc2a7cfa8a427.JPG

 

The lower clamp has two movable jaws. the one to the right holds the scroll saw blades. The middle one allows you to clamp a saber/jig saw blade, between it and the fixed jaw.

 

From the same seller, I also purchased a set of 4 step pulleys for the saw.

Edited by thibaultron

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Santa has been very good to me :)   I got a new scroll saw!

421833522_9.jpg.104cef48a851611ca017e34d1d9c632d.jpg

...and a couple neat Popeye gifts...

1486118488_1.jpg.415195675b557c89c77647abb2557f2a.jpg

1901320886_Popeyegoldcoins.jpg.6774214f1f62ee795c068133f5ee6227.jpg

the coins are from a friend of mine in Florida......he and his brothers all work and worked at Universal.  they are 24k gold plated!

Edited by popeye the sailor

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    My youngest brother (the one also with MD) left me with a few reminders of my original loooong past Christmas birthday.

100_5925.thumb.JPG.aa9a974c5b8e72b18fe2b73a630e976d.JPG

A framed plaque of historical facts from that year, a diecast metal version of the 49 Mercury coupe, and a Hotwheels somewhat modified version called the Hardnoze 49 Merc.

100_5919.thumb.JPG.dcae8c6ca06d08b52aaac75babeee462.JPG

100_5924.thumb.JPG.46f0d57eeae38e4fc444ac8740432cbd.JPG

Although several celebs were also born on the same day as me, namely actress Sissy Spacek and electric blues guitarist Joe Louis Walker, my supervisor seems unimpressed.

100_5922.thumb.JPG.127689bb472f8aae06dd40e419c52977.JPG

 

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I received a new paper model in my mailbox.

 

 

It is a bird that is not very common overhere, but I think non-existent in the states: a bluethroat. Cost: 7 euro's and some blue printer ink :)

 

IMG_0835.jpg.a71d0ce0dda6c7b7a9f04a67d745dbfe.jpgSome time, some place you'll get a 'buildlog' (not now, because I'm working on a previous 'look what is in my mailbox' model:

IMG_0830.jpg.f6c048c40de8169d8c9fe8ae5347b4de.jpg

 

Jan

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    Actually didn't get today, but rather a X-mas gift that I just reviewed today.  I have never used PE parts before but this one seems very interesting. 

100_5931.thumb.JPG.7629f88e4bd6f1983b80afbb73abbb38.JPG    It's made of two very thin sheets of steel rather than brass, but I am assuming the principal is the same.  It doesn't require glue as it use slots and tabs to hold it together.   

100_5933.thumb.JPG.f562cd4ed96f3beb43fdbd2e00e97155.JPG    The four sheets of instructions seem complete and straight forward.

100_5934.thumb.JPG.47bc6caae0db4620cd13f06fd486c91b.JPG

100_5936.thumb.JPG.03472c8a466ec0cbd50d230a6d74a7dd.JPG

100_5936.thumb.JPG.03472c8a466ec0cbd50d230a6d74a7dd.JPG

 

100_5937.thumb.JPG.bbff1c848601e91e73a0e077e82de54d.JPG Unfortunately I don't have any of the tools or the knowhow to work with it.  I've seen a few videos, but wouldn't know a decent bender from a poor one.  I have noticed that the bending fingers have many different shapes available similar to the sketches below.

100_5942.thumb.JPG.9acf25dadf09b2fb2d60d35e8ecbf3bd.JPG

    Most of the more affordable ($20-$40) bending brakes have A or B shaped edges.  That blunt edge would seem to be for just 90 degree bends, which would be a problem for lesser angles.  Shapes C and D would seem to be better suited for those bends, however they seem to be on the units in the $80-$100 units which would be a little steep for a tool only used for this one kit.  The question I think is, can the A or B shapes actually handle multiple angles since the kit has many five or more sided shapes to form.  Since bending the pieces more than two or three times will likely break them, getting the bends right the first time would be much prefered.  Or am I missing something here? :unsure:

 

 

100_5935.JPG

Edited by BETAQDAVE
extra photos at end

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I’ve made a few “metal” models and most of the the bending I did with tweezers or tiny needle nose pliers. I used various things for the cylindrical bends (drill bits, dowels, etc). The only need for a vending tool from the models I did was when you are attempting to bend a long thin edge. I hope you let us know how it turns out.

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Most bends can be made with a couple of tools already in the workshop: a steel ruler and a scalpel blade. This is the way model railroaders worked for a long time before PE was 'discovered'.by plastic modellers.

I use a tab as an example. Lay the part to be folded/bent on a hard surface. Glass works best.

Place the edge of the ruler across the workpiece with the tab to be bent exposed. The edge should be exactly where you want the inside of the completed fold. Press firmly.

Slide a scalpel blade under the tab as far as the fold line. Keeping it straight, and double-checking that the ruler has not moved, twist the blade toward the fold line. I find it helps to focus on the edge instead of looking at the progress of the fold. The folded tab is as good as any produced by the aftermarket folding devices.

With thicker material, use the scalpel to start the process and finish with a Stanley blade (box cutter).

 

It may be that your kit requires aftermarket tools to produce certain angles/shapes, but the method described above works. Try a few with scraps cut from the fret.

I assume it is stainless steel? You will find (no surprise) that the effort required to make a bend can vary quite a bit from one thickness to another but the thing to watch out for is the thicker SS may not give sharp bends without extra pressure on the ruler.

 

Looks like quite a kit!

 

Bruce

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10 hours ago, BETAQDAVE said:

    Actually didn't get today, but rather a X-mas gift that I just reviewed today.  I have never used PE parts before but this one seems very interesting. 

100_5931.thumb.JPG.7629f88e4bd6f1983b80afbb73abbb38.JPG    It's made of two very thin sheets of steel rather than brass, but I am assuming the principal is the same.  It doesn't require glue as it use slots and tabs to hold it together.   

100_5933.thumb.JPG.f562cd4ed96f3beb43fdbd2e00e97155.JPG    The four sheets of instructions seem complete and straight forward.

100_5934.thumb.JPG.47bc6caae0db4620cd13f06fd486c91b.JPG

100_5936.thumb.JPG.03472c8a466ec0cbd50d230a6d74a7dd.JPG

100_5936.thumb.JPG.03472c8a466ec0cbd50d230a6d74a7dd.JPG

 

100_5937.thumb.JPG.bbff1c848601e91e73a0e077e82de54d.JPG Unfortunately I don't have any of the tools or the knowhow to work with it.  I've seen a few videos, but wouldn't know a decent bender from a poor one.  I have noticed that the bending fingers have many different shapes available similar to the sketches below.

100_5942.thumb.JPG.9acf25dadf09b2fb2d60d35e8ecbf3bd.JPG

    Most of the more affordable ($20-$40) bending brakes have A or B shaped edges.  That blunt edge would seem to be for just 90 degree bends, which would be a problem for lesser angles.  Shapes C and D would seem to be better suited for those bends, however they seem to be on the units in the $80-$100 units which would be a little steep for a tool only used for this one kit.  The question I think is, can the A or B shapes actually handle multiple angles since the kit has many five or more sided shapes to form.  Since bending the pieces more than two or three times will likely break them, getting the bends right the first time would be much prefered.  Or am I missing something here? :unsure:

 

 

100_5935.JPG

Maybe you can post your review in the non-ship review area?

 

That looks great!

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Not today but for Christmas my sister got me this Trumpeter 1/700 DD Eisenhower. I was on the pre-comissioning crew for the real thing so I am a "plank owner" which means that supposedly I have the right to claim a piece of her when she is decommissioned. This was my first ship after getting out of A School in 1976. Only thing is I don't really do plastic models and I am not sure that I want to tack this for my first one.

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I also got this just prior to Christmas. This one I bought myself. 

 

326361683_20200113_1752581.thumb.jpg.e29c6c051f4e95ed2b49a5ec61d6b3a6.jpg

Yes it is a life size remote control duck from Vacu-Boat. I am going to build it up for the Admiral so that she can chase the ducks around our pond while I am sailing my RC Sailboats. I will probably do a build log for this one but it really comes mostly done just add ballast and electronics.

Edited by Osmosis

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3 hours ago, Roger Pellett said:

Eight more inches of snow on top of about two feet already on the ground.  The cul de sac in front of our house is ordinary perfectly flat.  The mound of snow has been plowed up by the city.  

    That's a coincidence Roger!  We got the same gift but only about six inches worth.  The kids in the neighborhood get a charge out of our pile in the middle of our cul de sac, using it to make snow forts and sled down the slope.  The gift that isn't appreciated, is the same plow likes to leave us with a knee deep pile to seal off our driveway right after our neighbors kid finished shoveling for us.

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Dave,  I assume the same storm that we got.  Winter plowing is a cottage industry here, and this year we were fortunate to find a good guy, so hopefully this spring we’ll not find yard damage.  We have the same problem that you do.  If he plows before the city does, then the city leaves an unwanted gift at the end of the driveway.   Today he was able to clean up what the city left.

 

Roger

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On 1/13/2020 at 5:48 PM, Osmosis said:

Yes it is a life size remote control duck from Vacu-Boat. I am going to build it up for the Admiral so that she can chase the ducks around our pond while I am sailing my RC Sailboats. I will probably do a build log for this one but it really comes mostly done just add ballast and electronics.

A duck terrorizer :P I like that I get that way with the furry tailed rats in the oaks out back sometimes esp when they start working on the house they go to the next plateau though. ;) Kevin

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Well, I didn't receive it -- I had to go get it (in Charlotte, NC), but we just got a 2017 Honda CR-V EX. We had a 2004 CR-V for 13 years, probably the best car we ever had. Hope this one will last just as long. It's definitely a lot cushier than the old one.

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