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6 hours ago, Haliburton said:

What often happens, speaking from personal experience with my son, is that if they are too young they “play” with these built kits and within a few months they are in enough pieces that nobody will ever spend the time to figure out how to put it together again based on the 100 page assembly instruction and then they end up in the big Rubbermaid LEGO box. Home to all the misfit LEGO pieces. Then you end up with what amounts to a box of imagination. Now that my son is older he builds and displays so not the same issue.  The Saturn V rocket is awesome btw. 

here it's more of a case "Daddy wants that Pirate ship because he never had one as a kid and now can afford it by himself", also true, after a few days most sets are being stripped down but in our case my son is starting always to build new stuff out of it (plus some parts are not in boxes and are freakish expensive when you try to order them separately i.e. mast and keel pieces which go for 20-30EUR a piece)

 

In our house all the Lego pieces are always built into "something"

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I was way beyond the age, where one plays with LEGO, when these 'kits' came onto the market, but I always had the feeling that they defeat the object: to create something from simple building blocks. It was the original idea, to stimulate creativity and to give room to it. What is the point, when you have a special part that can only be used for one particular purpose ? It seems that LEGO tried to compete with these 'kits' against other toys on the market. OK, I liked the wheels (and remember that I go the first set for my 6th birthday), but then LEGO began to compete against the 'Meccano'-type concepts (in Germany the model train manufacturers Märklin and Trix made such sets), for which a system based on bricks wasn't really suited. Even as a youngster I felt that they were forcing the concept.

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No Legos here as kid.  All we had were "Lincoln Logs" and I forget the name but it just a box of plastic bricks.   Now queue up all the comments about "we I was a kid all we had were rocks and dirt".... :P

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2 minutes ago, mtaylor said:

queue up all the comments about "we I was a kid all we had were rocks and dirt".... :P

My parents spoiled us with “creative” toys. We always lagged behind in video game type stuff, but boy I loved my LEGO sets, Lincoln Logs, K’NEX, etc. Now my family has Daddy’s LEGOs and the kids LEGOs... I think  that Toys R Us jingle worked on me 😉

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For us, it was Tinker Toys when young, then the plastic bricks (really bad marketing because I can't remember the name either), Lincoln Logs,  Erector Set.

In the vein of "rocks and dirty".

Once, when my folks visited an elderly couple, they pulled some old toys to keep me busy.  Some of it really struck me:  thin rectangular blocks of actual granite.  Smooth on all six sides, crisp edges, 

I had two thoughts, ' wow,  this must have been expensive to make ' and ' how the heck do you keep anything you build with this held together? '  Either, the rich kids from the 20's and 30's had really elegant toys, or these were really quarry salesman samples and not toys at all.

Of course, there is always Dan's cardboard toy drum with the picture of a Quaker on it.

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My dad was a cheapskate.  At Christmas when I was eleven (1947) I really, really wanted Meccano.  What he got me was a thing called a Juneero.  Came with a few half-inch-wide strips of thin mild steel sheet, and some 1/8” steel wire, and a packet of nuts.  The Juneero tool (google it!) could put a 90 degree bend in the steel strip, or the wire, or shear them, and could put a thread onto the wire to take the nuts.

Have to admit it did what it claimed to do.  You could build things with it, and I did get a lot of fun from it.

But I did want Meccano ...

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49 minutes ago, Nirvana said:

Brian, do you still have your Juneero kit and tool? 
They are worth some money today and even on display at museums.

No, Dr. Per, I’m afraid mine went the way that most outgrown toys went.  Nostalgia occasionally sends me in pursuit of someone else’s old Juneero, but to this day I haven’t found one in reasonable enough condition and at a reasonable enough price!

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18 minutes ago, thibaultron said:

Mine was erector sets.

I think many of us did.  Then we hit a certain age, and they disappeared.  If in the original box, they're worth some money.   My mom was known for tossing stuff out when us kids "out grew it". When I got out of the Marines and went home, there wasn't much of my stuff left.

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On 10 May 2020 at 5:49 PM, BLACK VIKING said:

I wished you lived near me, trying to get a face mask is near impossible for me. Well done my friend for looking after your neighbors Brian 

I would like to give Brian aka probablynot  a big shout out to say thank you so much for making me some masks and sending them to me. I look after my wife so we have been self isolating but I still have to go shopping so these will be brilliant. Thanks again Brian 👏🏻👍🏻

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My mother was the same, after I started collage, my brother got my old room, and I slept in the old guest room, when I was back home. Most of my finished models went into one big box, with the expected damage, and they threw out about 20 years of one of my old Model Railroad magazines, and a lot of the knick knacks I had collected (not decorations but little things I had collected from museum trips, vacations, old toys (including the erector sets), etc., and most of my paperback books). Thankfully they kept the Model Railroader, and Railroad Model Craftsman ones, I think mostly because my brother was also into MRR. The models were not a great loss, but I was upset. Later after I moved to Baltimore, I had left my Lionel and Marx O scale stuff, and they sold it at a yard sale, instead of asking if I still wanted it.

 

When my sons moved out I had them go through their stuff, and either take it, chuck it, or I kept some packed for when they settled down.

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Great Underhill volume there. You'll find it most helpful.  While there are other valuable works on the clippers (e.g.: Crothers' The American Built Clipper Ships and Longridge on Cutty Sark,) I believe this is probably the definitive one on the later "ocean carriers." 

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6 minutes ago, Bob Cleek said:

Great Underhill volume there. You'll find it most helpful.  While there are other valuable works on the clippers (e.g.: Crothers' The American Built Clipper Ships and Longridge on Cutty Sark,) I believe this is probably the definitive one on the later "ocean carriers." 

yes Bob, i picked a set up of the Longridge last June, again for a very good price

IMG_4417.JPG

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2 minutes ago, Bob Cleek said:

Say no more! Say no more! That Longridge Cutty Sark set was a real find. Does it include plans sheets in a pocket or fold out pages? 

yes Bob, its all there, infarct i dont think they had ever been opened up

IMG_4416.JPG

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It doesn't get any better than that. There are used copies available on line, but I haven't noticed any of the sellers confirming that the plans sheets are in the pockets. One does have a generic disclaimer that "supplemental sheets may be omitted" or words to that effect. I wouldn't want to have to deal with the hassle of ordering the book and then have to send it back because the pockets were empty, in which case they'd probably try to tell me that was tough luck anyway.

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Looks like the mail system "in country" here in the States is getting back to something resembling normal.  I received the cannons from Chuck for my Bellle Poule build.  

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Glad to hear it's getting better domestically Mark. I am waiting on a small package that was posted in California on 15 Apr. It was received at the USPS international distribution centre in Los Angeles on 16 Apr, and 32 days later, on 18 May it arrived a LA International Airport. Another six days later and it still has not actually left the Airport...

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In the past two months I've had two different packages arrive at the distribution center in Augusta, GA, which normally means I get them the next day, then be sent out of state, bounce around for a week, and then finally arrive back in Augusta, and then sent to me!

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I consider myself lucky after reading your comments Ron and Grant.   I think part of the problem for Grant is the airlines are still not flying anywhere near the flights they were.  I would hope when the flights start getting back to normal (for some value of normal), mail starts moving faster.

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