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G.L.

Anatomy of a boat by G.L. - scale 1/10 - POF - SMALL

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In August, after finishing my smack cross section, I started a new project. The first series of pictures are sorted now, it is time to start with the log of this new scratch project.

 

Introduction

Since ages, the ship model was the ideal tool to show how a vessel fits together.
Ship builders used models to present their new designs to the admiralties. (painting 'A New Ship for the Dutch' John Seymour Lucas)

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In the 19th and early 20th century they were very suitable for museums to show to the general public how live on board of a ship was. (Picture of the old Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, borrowed from the website of the Rijksmuseum).

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And not least, the ship model was used as a didactic tool in maritime education. (Source of picture: fishermen's orphans during nautical education, 'IBIS' Orphan school in Ostend during the 50ties. Screenshot from archive movie 'Koninklijk Werk IBIS')

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I had my first naval training in the mid-seventies. In that time the era in which the ship model was a current didactic tool was already past. The ship model was replaced by slides on overhead projectors and video.
Nowadays maritime education centers use Power point, smart boards, digital simulators, and all kind of virtual tools.
But I still remember that the Mine Warfare School in Ostend had a series of beautiful dioramas to demonstrate all the different types of mine sweeping gear, in the seamanship classroom in the Naval Education Center they had all kinds of models of the rigging for replenishment at sea. We learned the maritime buoyage system with models of the buoys. During sailing classes we learned the different parts of the sail boat with the help of a 1/5 scale model of the Caravelle sailing boat.
All those fine didactic models are vanished. I suppose that a lot turned into dust in cellars and attics. Some disappeared probably to private collections and hopefully some are preserved in museums although I didn't see back a lot of them.

Up to now I have built some didactic models, two cross sections and a full framed fishing sloop with one side left open. From nostalgic motive I want to build a pure educational model. It will be a old fashioned school model, intended to learn a landlubber (or a new naval recruit) the different parts of a boat.

The image below shows more or less what I have in mind: making a model of a stripped boat and naming all the parts of it. (drawing from 'Le Chasse Marée')

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I find a suitable design for my project in the book 'Apprendre le modelisme naval' (a publication of Le Chasse Marée).

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In the chapter 'Le modèle de chartente' (the model on frames) the boat carpenter Gerd Löhmann explains how to make a model on frames. The chapter is a description of the build of the mackerel cutter 'Marie', a small sailing fishing sloop of the type which was used along the Breton coast (France) before World war II. Gerd Löhmann built his cutter just like I would like to be my didactic model (Picture from the book 'Apprendre le modelisme naval').

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The book contains also the detailed plans of the vessel on scale 1/10. The real vessel was built in 1928 and was 6.86 m long, so the model will be ±69 cm long. I will build it in cherry (Picture from the book 'Apprendre le modelisme naval').

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Some time ago I got a few stumps from the trunk of a cherry tree that an acquaintance cut down in his garden. I have split the stumps into sawable pieces an stowed them away on a dry space.

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That is the wood I will use for my instruction model: Some pieces sawn into planks, ready to  be planed to the necessary thicknesses.

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To finish this post, a word about the layout of this building log. I would like to make this project not simply an instruction model, but also a lexicon and encyclopedia about wooden shipbuilding terms. So, I will work in three phases: first the boat model, then the lexicon and finally the encyclopedia. My log will follow this sequence and will be build up in three chapters:

I. The Boat

II. The Lexicon

III. The Encyclopedia

Now I am ready to start. The keel will be laid in my next post.

I hope I will be able to captivate you with this new project.

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I'm going to follow this shipbuilding lesson.
I will be quiet in the classroom, and pay attention ;)

 

Also did some homework. I have also had to cut down a cherry tree, the suitable pieces are dried and ready for further processing.

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7 hours ago, G.L. said:

All those fine didactic models are vanished. I suppose that a lot turned into dust in cellars and attics.

This is so sad to see happen.

 

7 hours ago, G.L. said:

It will be a old fashioned school model, intended to learn a landlubber (or a new naval recruit) the different parts of a boat

I've pulled up a front row seat for this build log G.L.  A great idea and I know I will learn a lot from it.  

 

Gary

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Le Chasse Maree is an excellent magazine which has been published for many years and covers various subjects related to the sea and boats, in depth.

I have a few issues at home and really like it. You picked up an excellent and traditional subject for your build.

 

Yves

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On 11/23/2019 at 1:19 PM, Backer said:

I'm going to follow this shipbuilding lesson.
I will be quiet in the classroom, and pay attention ;)

 

Also did some homework. I have also had to cut down a cherry tree, the suitable pieces are dried and ready for further processing.

Patrick, I have good news for you: this will be a course without exam.🤩

Cherry is a fine wood to work with. It works a lot easier than oak and when sawing, planing and sanding it smells very good.

 

On 11/23/2019 at 4:08 PM, FriedClams said:

This is so sad to see happen.

 

I've pulled up a front row seat for this build log G.L.  A great idea and I know I will learn a lot from it.  

 

Gary

It is so with a lot of things Gary. At a certain moment things become old fashioned and are thrown away and after a while when almost nothing is left of it any more, it becomes vintage and everyone wants it again.

Welcome in the classroom, take a seat next to Patrick.

 

On 11/23/2019 at 4:48 PM, thibaultron said:

I'll be following, with interest!

Also welcome Ron.

 

On 11/25/2019 at 4:51 PM, yvesvidal said:

Le Chasse Maree is an excellent magazine which has been published for many years and covers various subjects related to the sea and boats, in depth.

I have a few issues at home and really like it. You picked up an excellent and traditional subject for your build.

 

Yves

Hello, Yves. I have also several editions of the magazine and some other publications of le Chasse Marée. They contain indeed a treasure of information on traditional boat building. This model will be something total different than a type German VIIC submarine, a lot less technical and complicated, but I like very much the lines of this traditional Breton sloop.

 

On 11/25/2019 at 7:12 PM, Mike Y said:

Interesting take, it would be great! :) 

Thank you Mike, welcome in this project.

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CHAPTER I. The Boat

 

1. Keel and stems

 

Starting with the keel, the prow and the stem. To saw them in the right shape I glue a copy of the plan on the different pieces of wood.

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For the right cuts, I clamp my work piece with the cutting line along two steel L-profiles in the vise and saw with a hand scrub along the profiles.

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Where I have to saw curves, I use the jig saw...

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.. and the band- (outer curves) and drum (inner curves) sander to finish.

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In the back side of the stern post there has to be made a round groove to give room for the rudder. I made it before sawing the sternpost. I have no precision tools to do it, therefore I make a much longer piece then needed; that gives me the opportunity to choose the best piece to make the sternpost from.

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At the bottom of the sternpost is a pin which fits in a hole in the keel. Sawing the pin.

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Making the hole in the keel.

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Keel and stems glued together

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Thank you for the likes

Thank you to follow

Tank you for the constructive comments.

 

Till next week!

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20 hours ago, vaddoc said:

Hope I am not too late! 

Great project, I ll be following. What is the massive gun in the background?

 

Vaddoc

Hello Vaddoc,

Welcome to join the club.

I bought the gun on an online flea market auction. I made a bid of 20€ and the gun was mine. It is a cast iron gun of 55 cm long. I do not know what it what it was for. Certainly not to shoot with.

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I still have to decide what I will do with it: rig it like a naval gun or like a field gun what it probably portraits, but in the case it will become very big (see example below). All suggestions are welcome!IMG_3687.thumb.JPG.115ad6ed605413ee318468ce4ebfa419.JPG

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On 11/29/2019 at 4:59 AM, mtaylor said:

That's not a small signalling cannon is it?  Might just be a decorative piece.

 

6 hours ago, GrandpaPhil said:

The field gun would be awesome!

 

Yes Mark, I think also that it is more a decorative gun than a signaling gun.

 

Phil, that's also my idea. The main problem with a field gun is that it will be such a huge piece to place somewhere. I foresee a strong opposition by the Commander in Chief Home Fleet.

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I live with snail mail and just got my invitations.  Sign me up!  There is a You Tube series by the Sampson Boat Co rebuilding the SV Tally Ho.  These guys are doing this full size.  Worth a visit.

Edited by PopDavid
reference to Sampson Boat Co had name wrong

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On 11/23/2019 at 1:19 PM, Backer said:

I'm going to follow this shipbuilding lesson.
I will be quiet in the classroom, and pay attention ;)

 

Also did some homework. I have also had to cut down a cherry tree, the suitable pieces are dried and ready for further processing.

If it is not a problem I would be in the school desk with Patrick, I know I am a little late, but to recover I cut a cherry tree, a pear tree, an apple tree, a plum tree and then my wife "inflated" me!

apart from the "jokes" I follow you willingly  :rolleyes:

black Wolf

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On 12/1/2019 at 6:01 AM, PopDavid said:

I live with snail mail and just got my invitations.  Sign me up!  There is a You Tube series by the Sampson Boat Co rebuilding the SV Tally Ho.  These guys are doing this full size.  Worth a visit.

 

On 11/30/2019 at 9:29 AM, amateur said:

Sir,

 

The bridge was open, and all the traffic lights went red. Sorry, I'm a bit late.

Am I still allowed to enter class_room?

 

Jan

 

On 12/2/2019 at 1:02 AM, luponero said:

If it is not a problem I would be in the school desk with Patrick, I know I am a little late, but to recover I cut a cherry tree, a pear tree, an apple tree, a plum tree and then my wife "inflated" me!

apart from the "jokes" I follow you willingly  :rolleyes:

black Wolf

 

On 12/2/2019 at 8:39 PM, KeithAug said:

Great project GL. I will be interested to follow developments.

Gentlemen, there is no numerus clausus for this class. Everybody is welcome and for the latecomers: it is going slow enough to catch up.

Thank you so much for your interest.

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The real boat had a cast iron ballast keel. Gerd Löhmann gave his model a wooden keel, painted in black to imitate the lead. I want to give my model a real metal keel. I will make my keel of tin. I first make a dummy keel in spruce wood which will serve as template to make the casting mold.

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Filling up the dead wood.

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All the wooden parts of the keel are now made. I screw the ballast keel template provisionally  on the keel to glue the dead wood pieces in place to shape the sides of the keel.

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I draw the rebates which have to be made on the stem.

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Before chiseling the stem, I will make the stem knee to give it some more strength.

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I make also the stern knee.

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Now I can make the rebates.

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Checking the depth of it.

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The round groove of the sternpost has to continue on the back of the keel and the dead wood. I file it out with a round wood file and sand it afterward.

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The forward part of the bow has to be narrowed. Cutting the bow in shape with the chisel.

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The keel is wider than the bow. It has to narrow gradually to the fore end to the width of the bow. It is also done with the wood chisel.

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The keel as it is now.

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Thank you for the likes

Thank you to follow

Tank you for the constructive comments.

 

Till next week!

Edited by G.L.

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On 12/1/2019 at 6:01 AM, PopDavid said:

I live with snail mail and just got my invitations.  Sign me up!  There is a You Tube series by the Sampson Boat Co rebuilding the SV Tally Ho.  These guys are doing this full size.  Worth a visit.

David, Thanks to mention to me the Sampson Boat Co  YouTube movies. They look me perfect to watch while my wife in to the evening course in the art school.

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19 hours ago, vaddoc said:

Very nice work on the rabbet, I guess your chisels are razor sharp! Very crisp edges, I always struggle and end up with wider margins and irregular surfaces. 

Thanks for your compliment Vaddoc.

Before every use I give my chisels a series of hauls on the whetstone. That keeps sharp.DSC00855.JPG.78ba1d2eace832bfe593cd027dc2db58.JPG

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16 hours ago, KeithAug said:

Very nice woodwork GL. I note you work in a T shirt. Is it particularly warm in Belgium at the moment - unlike this side of the channel?

Thank you also Keith.

No we don't have a micro climate here. At our side of the channel it is as cold and wet as at yours. Like I mentioned in my first post, the project started in August and the keel was made in that period. I waited some time to start this log because at that time I still had to loft out the 22 frames for the model. I am a digital illiterate, so I have to do that at the drawing table with pencil and compass which took me almost two months. To avoid  week after week post which the only mention that I drew two or three frames during last week, I let some time pass until that job was done. I like to give every week an update with some progress and I have also the experience with that the time advantage will be quickly overtaken by the real time. Within a couple of weeks my other project 'the gaff sailing boat' won't be a retroactive project anymore.

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The notch for the garboard stroke is to be cut in the keel. I draw the shape of the notch on a piece of tracing paper and bring it over to the keel with the help of carbon paper. The advantage of tracing paper is: when you turn it upside down you have the drawing in mirror image to draw it on the other side of the keel.

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Cutting the notch with the chisel.

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Making the rudder trunk (or is the correct name: 'helm port'?).

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The transom of the vessel is attached to two arms, in Dutch they are called 'achterloop' or 'jambekken', I believe that the English term is 'counter timber'.
Making the counter timbers:

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The counter timbers attached to the keel:

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As I mentioned before, I want to make a tin ballast keel to imitate the cast iron keel which had the original vessel. I will make a mold in plaster.
I start with making a formwork around my dummy keel. The attached bulb on the second picture serves to make a pour funnel.

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The mold, filled with plaster.

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When the plaster dried, I can take it out of the mold (finally I did have to make a new plaster mold, because the one on this picture didn't dry completely and was too fragile due to a wrong mixing ratio between plaster and water (too much water).

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The new mold, dry and ready to be filled with tin.

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I bought two staves of plumbers tin.

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Melting the tin. I did not make a picture of the pouring itself because holding a pan with melted tin in one hand and pour while using the other hand to make a selfie didn't seem a wise idea to me.

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When the keel is cooled down, it can be taken out of the mold. The appendix at the left side is the pour funnel which has to be sawn off.

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The finished ballast keel.

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Fitting the keel on the model

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Finally the keel is blackened and holes (air bubbles) at the surface are puttied. Now the keel can be stuck to the model with structural glue.

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Thank you for the likes

Thank you to follow

Thank you for the constructive comments.

 

Till next week!

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3 hours ago, G.L. said:

Melting the tin. I did not make a picture of the pouring itself because holding a pan with melted tin in one hand and pour while using the other hand to make a selfie didn't seem a wise idea to me.

Great work 

And a very wise decision ;)

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