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HMS Speedy by Vane - Vanguard Models - Scale 1:64 - Master Shipwright (limited edition)

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As I see it...the laser engraved deck is a good template for planking the deck myself with prefered wood. But it's al just a matter of taste in my opinion.

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Like to see some of your work Bob.

Personally my view is that NONE of the decks really look like the real thing -caulking and treenails just don't show like that. Especially the nails  which don't show at all much if it all - but I always do them because I like them

So it really is a matter of personal preference.

I have one of the latest Speedy - decks the laser work is immaculate but the deck sort of feels toooo perfect.but will produce a result much better than my aged fingers could ever even approach and if I want to finish it in my lifetime I suspect I will use it. It's the nibbing which attracts me so much

 

 

 

 

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I have just ordered the HMS Speedy kit and I'm looking forward to starting the build when the kit arrives. I plan to keep a build log and maybe also track some progress with some video's.

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It’s gonna look great Vane, I’m using maple on my Revenge build and I’m loving the flame figure coming through on the planks. Adds some extra dimension and just looks rich! I’ve seen a lot of clear grain/white maple decks on here and they all look great!

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Only one problem and thats is that my maple is not the best. I have to sand all sides of each plank individually due to the rough edges.  Its ok for a small deck like Speedy's but it will be very time consuming for my Diana. 

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On 1/25/2020 at 6:02 PM, Vane said:

Thats just a shot with my mobile. The lamp was on and full daylight from the window so I am not surprised that the whitebalance is off.  I will do studioshots with my profoto flashes and Nikon D500 once the deck and 2nd planking are complete.  

sorry, I was actually responding in terms of Chris' Instruction manual photos....

Edited by glbarlow

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On 2/14/2020 at 2:50 PM, Vane said:

So I have finally decided to go with my own maple....

20200214_214819.jpg

I'll be interested to see how it comes out.  My current plan is to use the engraved deck and see how that comes out.  I've planked every ship with holly or ash, spent all the time doing it and then once the ship is built out and rigged its not all that noticeable. I get the master builder point and the nuance of all modelers - and the fact that before now we really didn't have a choice. But maybe on this one I'll just enjoy the engraved deck.  The Speedy might be the first kit I don't bash.

 

One thing that did jump out is how wide the planks on the engraved deck are, mine are normally 4-5mm.

 

One point to check before you get to far is making sure the cannon still fit in the gun ports with the thicker planking..

Edited by glbarlow

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On 12/14/2019 at 2:33 AM, Vane said:

Interesting, I have to try that too. there are many ways to do this. But i Think the gamechanger for me was when i bought my heatgun from Proxxon and started prebending the planks sideways. Everything fits so much better.

 

20191213_230658.jpg

I’ve adopted the Chuck method too. It’s great. I’m m using a stream travel iron though as the heat source, much quieter:-)

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On 1/9/2020 at 10:36 PM, SpyGlass said:

Bending the gun port strips is an old issue - Speedy is nothing like as difficult as say Pegasus.

Soak the strip fit it and clamp or pin - let it dry - and then do it again !

A bit of time and you can get the strip to sit exactly without having to clamp it to shape as you glue.

Lots of Fly/Pegasus logs but heres a pointer to mine at the strip shaping point gunport strip shaping

 

I trace the outline of half the ship (from above view) from the plans, transfer that to a piece of 1x4 inch lumber, cut out the half hull profile with a scroll saw, cut a few notches into opposite side, soak the gunport patterns a few hours then clamp and rubber band it to dry on my board. 
 

The pattern then fits the ship perfectly and easily with no risk to the hull. I devised this when building my Pegasus, it also worked great on the bows of my Vanguard. 

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Interesting - I wonder quite how one gets the lovely S shaped Fly/Pegasus vertical curves in.

BUT this set me thinking - if you preserve the ply sheet from which the BHs came then you can use those to produce exact formers to get the vertical curves in. 

Though with Speedy I just did a soak and clamp and they have come out quite well  - when I get my new house !! I will need to do just abit more precise shaping.

 

Its KILLING me  being unable to actual touch any of my builds - all in store !

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 I trace the outline of half the ship (from above view) from the plans, transfer that to a piece of 1x4 inch lumber, cut out the half hull profile with a scroll saw, cut a few notches into opposite side, soak the gunport patterns a few hours then clamp and rubber band it to dry on my board.  

 

Can I ask, why did you not use the kit provided patterns or am I missing something?

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Sorry, still don’t understand. You could score the kit template on the inside to help bending and you could clamp the wetted template to the kit sides to allow it to pre-form, leave to dry and then when happy glue the template to the model? Your method seems an unnecessary exercise.

 

 

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These gun port strips are a great assistance when supplied. On smaller vessels fitting them is not a huge problem.

 

But builders of say Fly or Pegasus have more problems since the strips need to be shaped both horizontally and vertically.

Here is one of mine from a Fly I think.  But this in a different league from the vessel here

post-905-0-91863100-1361569710_thumb.jpg

But on a smaller build there is more freedom. 

The important thing in my book is not to dry fit especially just as you fix the strip.

So pre shaping the strips in some form is good.

The point of doing it "Off Build" is that  affixing damp strip to the bulkheads and letting dry gives the possibility of damaging the bulkheads as  Glenn says.

Mind have you SEEN Glenns logs so he should not be ignored !! However I have never found this a problem in many many builds .

But  an initial bend off vessel I have done - but simply - without accuracy.

Here is Pickle being pre bent with a bit of an angle on the strips giving a tad of vertical shaping too

post-905-0-09594300-1416160054_thumb.jpg

But my mantra is soak and shape on hull , soak and shape...

I really really advise against scoring - too much can go wrong - the gunport cutouts weaken the strip

 

I am sorry my Speedy is in store ready for my house move - soon now - so I dont have any pics but the strips are nearly completely shaped with just one dampening (30 mins in warm water) and lots of elastic bands ! It will probbaly need one more pass . But I would suggest its easiest to do it this way.

Just as a footnote - because the hull sits together so well - I did this first shaping without gluing the hull keel or bulk heads  - just a few extra clamps and rubber bands to safeguard delicate bits

Edited by SpyGlass

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6 hours ago, AlanDavison said:

 I trace the outline of half the ship (from above view) from the plans, transfer that to a piece of 1x4 inch lumber, cut out the half hull profile with a scroll saw, cut a few notches into opposite side, soak the gunport patterns a few hours then clamp and rubber band it to dry on my board.  

 

Can I ask, why did you not use the kit provided patterns or am I missing something?

I am not sure why u got that impression. I used them, see my earlier posts.

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4 hours ago, AlanDavison said:

Your method seems an unnecessary exercise.

 

 

It is good practice and one I follow. Pre-forming on a firm board, rather than the somewhat fragile frame prevents breakage and is far less a struggle. The board, properly prepared provides firm and easy to access clamping points that also allow me to ease the pattern into the right shape. The ply on a gun port pattern is very stiff, and it is ply, too much soaking it will warp as it dries and possibly even delaminate. Scoring is not something I’d do.
 

Using this process actually saves me time, saves me from the struggle of fighting alignment on the boat frame, and provides a smooth unwavering pattern. You can put the patterns on it lots of ways, but this method works and works well. While the Speedy may be easier given it’s shape, I’d not managed to get the patterns on either Pegasus or Vanguard without it. 
 

While I’m sure there are many methods, this one has made my building easier.  I was just sharing what I do.

Edited by glbarlow

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Glenn is right - many methods . But one cannot argue with his results!!

I still prefer my own soak and clamp method but he does highlight a relevant problem - drying and shaping on the hull and clamping can cause mishaps to the BH tops etc. Especially as in this case with MDF . So whatever method - be careful .

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Post #19 in my Vanguard log is where I described fitting the patterns, it was a far bigger deal than the Speedy. I was more clever back then.  Sorry Vane, no more hijacking your log.  

 

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I cant really follow the discussion… people seam to mix up my buildlog with others. Regarding the gunpatterns, I used the ones supplied and soaked them in hot water for a while and then glued them in place. It was a very easy process and they fitted very good. Chris design made this much easier than on my Snake or Granado. One thing that helps is the rabbit line so you basically just need to place it there and bend it in position. It is also great that the pattern is divided in two.

When it comes to the deck, I didnt use the supplied pattern but are working with my own maple deck instead.   

20191129_230036_jpg_5c24122e7cfb3bc3584d0e9c21f8c295.jpg

20191130_143806_thumb_jpg_f4949480e2f94264f7143da47e557353.jpg

Edited by Vane

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Yes, that’s how I did mine. The fit is so good and the ply is so bendible(?) that apart from a little wetting there no need for building a separate jig (in my humble opinion). I did score the back of the lower transom piece as this aided in forming the concave surface and I think this helped as it reduces the tension on the glued surfaces. I also left off the transom pieces until I had fixed the rear gun port pattern to avoid the possibility of breaking them, and it worked fine.

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I’m sure having the slots at the bow and a stockier frame with additional bulkheads make my process unnecessary on the Speedy. Chris designed a great model. Sorry I brought it up.

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Finally done laying my "scratchbuilt" maple deck! 

 

Once it has been cleaned up i will post some comparison photos with the engraved. I think i took the right decision but the engraved would had saved me alot of time. But i want it to go better with my other builds so maple it is.

 

A couple of tips if you want to do it yourself is that you try to get hold of better quality wood that you dont have to sand on the sides. Also having a disksander for the tips is extremily helpful. 

20200225_225822.jpg

Edited by Vane

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Looks nice. I'm undecided with my build, but I'm more inclined toward the laser cut deck at the moment but I'm tempted to try replicate the laser cut deck with actual deck planking.

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Hi Vane, catching up a bit here.  I think you absolutely made the right decision, personal opinion of course.   I feel even a less than perfect deck gives a better look than a 'perfect' laser etched version, nothing like doing it yourself.  And I can relate to your concern for Diana, most definitely is time consuming.  'Jason' is on hiatus right now as I'm struggling to find some decent maple wood for the quarterdeck and fo'c'sl - my experience was the same as you - the maple I had to use for the upper deck required sanding pretty much every strip, and even when that worked out, there was some odd pitting on the deck surface that I just couldn't eradicate completely.  BTW - she's looking great!

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Thanks Jason, I been missing your updates. Hope it sorts it out soon. Every plank i dont spend enough time on stands out.

 

I am not completely happy but here is the result after scraping. 

20200227_085856.thumb.jpg.c39ae9b13071dfb7394420f6a650fd97.jpg20200226_210228.thumb.jpg.98b2a8331dc2b9854581f028ada61b5e.jpg20200226_210251.thumb.jpg.68b81458c6da56bd85e3569629265c30.jpg

20200226_210247.jpg

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For me it’s the etched deck every time, but I hope you enjoyed the exercise! Well done.Moving further on in the build, I’ve been pondering the anchor cable would be weighed. From the plans the anchor cable descends into the cable tier via the square holes in the foremost grating. To me this seems too soon, as the opening is very close to the bow and a long way from the capstan, so how would the messenger cable be fixed and used. Any advice from you knowledgeable folk out there would be fantastic.

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