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Hank

Converting a Backyard Shed into a Model Workshop

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Ron,

Yes, they are particle board sides. However, when I screwed the 1x3 frames along each side, I used construction adhesive and 1 1/4" sharp point lathe screws. The worksurface will be glued to the frame - I had thought about using screws, but this construction adhesive won't come apart, so with clamps in place, I think this will be sufficient to tie the worksurface down. The frame is mainly to give horizontal strength - the surface actually sits on each of the cabinets so they really carry the "load", so to speak. But....I understand what you are saying about the particle board sides. FYI - The 2x3 along the wall is screwed into the wall studs and only had a couple lathe screws on the ends to hold the cabinets in place - I also glued the backs of the cabinets to the wall in addition to lathe screws. Thanks for the advice, always welcomed!!!

Hank

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Hank,

Check Lowe's online.  If the local is out, they'll ship it to your store for pick-up....usually.  Last time I used them, there was disclaimer about  it.  Home Depot might have what you need also if there's one close.

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5 hours ago, mtaylor said:

Hank,

Check Lowe's online.  If the local is out, they'll ship it to your store for pick-up....usually.  Last time I used them, there was disclaimer about  it.  Home Depot might have what you need also if there's one close.

Mark, I appreciate the advice. The only thing about Lowe's is that you end of paying shipping if they ship it to your house. And right now I'm not sure about how long it would take to order the lumber vs going to another store near by and getting it myself.

 

I did make a local run and picked up one of the 4 edge-glued boards I'll need - the short, 4' long board which will be shortened by about 5" or so. Tonight I got the backsplashes stained, cut to fit, and installed. During the Lowe's trip I also picked up (3) 12" W. Pine boards (they were cheaper than the shelves that were for sale!) - sanded, and installed them along the back, left wall. Then, finished the primer on the windows and touch up all around. Lastly, I brought the center work surface out from the garage and positioned it for install tomorrow. So, here's where we're at:

Shelves_1.thumb.jpg.8f4255314d1c6c5cb2e7c4077f2257e8.jpg1039290472_CenterWorkbench_1.thumb.jpg.5c4121dc78660dfc80846471bff6aa7d.jpg

Somewhere I have a bag of new receptacle covers and I can't find them in all this "stuff"!!!!🥵 I'd hate to have to go spend money on items I know are around somewhere!!! IT'S KILLIN' ME!!!!!

 

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A light colored vinyl tile flooring, that is peel and stick should be quick, easy for rolling stools and machine stands,  and give a better chance of recovering dropped or jumping parts,  as well as helping with the lighting.  Wet swabbing or a ruff leak - a blue million seams would not be good for the subfloor.

By using Liquid Nails, it seems that you do not share Moriarty's philosophy  of having a reverse gear faster than the forward gears.

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Dr. Per, Dean (Jaager):

Flooring - well, when we had our house renovated in 2018, I had the existing dk. bwn. laminate flooring removed and stored in the shed by the contractors. My plan was to re-use it in the shop - at least in the back or shop area (behind the partition). I also had them roll up & stow the best of the existing Berber carpeting for use in the front of the shop. I also planned to make a small entrance area in front of the dbl doors using alternate black/white 12" vinyl tiles (as Jaager suggested) - sort of a throw back to Nelson's flooring in his cabin, etc. So, that's the plan - we'll see how things progress!!

Hank

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Did get some work done today/tonight - one small surface board to go and then I'll be finished installing the workbench. I've been polyurethaning as I go, and will sand and then put a final coat on once all the pieces are in place. Also, did a bit more touch up on the wall/trim primer. So, here's where we stand:

WB_1.thumb.jpg.046016ab16e1d501ebc01ceab453fa66.jpgWB_2.thumb.jpg.b81c6afed0e2c83aa277ada30c2c4fce.jpg

After some conversation with another forum modeler re. the flooring and my stated plans, I'm doing a re-think on this - haven't come to a conclusion yet but looking at various options at this point. 

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Hank,

 

If the spacing and thickness of the floor joists leave something to be desired,  perhaps another layer of subflooring - with staggered seams., first?

If you use long countersink drywall screws,  it can be undone, or later repurposed.

Under the bottom shelf on the left and under the cabinets on the right,  at first I thought, under the cabinet lights,  but they look long enough that a full on 4 foot LED ceiling fixture would fit.  They are so light weight and pull so little current that a couple of big boys should work.

And a large, wall mounted, battery powered clock.  Some of them "talk" to the Bureau  of Standards everyday a self correct-  who knows, maybe they work for the NSA too?

 

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Jaager,

The spacing on the floor joists is satisfactory; and, with a couple very small exceptions, the plywood shed floor doesn't need any attention (in front at the doors I intend to fill some pitted areas with Durham's Hard as Rock wood filler and then sanding smooth prior to putting down the final flooring. I intend to go thru and make sure all the original nails are pounded down as flat as possible.

The LED under cabinet lights are a good suggestion - right now, the workbench gets fairly good light at night and in the sunny daytime it's really quite good. I may add some additional lighting on the right where bench top tools will be located. We'll see - once I've actually started using things and see how the present lighting works or doesn't work. And - I have one of those Atomic Powered Clocks which will be moved from garage to shop - I've noticed the lack of a wall clock!

Thanks for the great suggestions!!

Hank

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OK, so tonight I got all the worksurface pieces cut to size, fitted, and installed. Then, did a complete coat of polyurethane. Will sand tomorrow, and repeat. Also, installed one 36" receptacle strip below the side window and bought a 4' LED under counter fixture at Lowe's but that's going back - no installed wiring (110v AC w/plug) - not that I can't, but I would rather purchase a unit that's all there (plug & play, if you will!).

Looked into the vinyl floor tiles - 12x12 would be extremely busy - I laid out a pattern of black/white diamonds 12x12 and that's just too extreme. But, 16x16 might work better and even 24x24 might work, as well. I know I can get the 16x16, but haven't researched the larger ones yet.

So, here's where I'm at:

1806334094_workbenchpolyed_1.thumb.jpg.0b0f6e006c25ff7bf2e33691637a98a9.jpg1338045297_workbenchpolyed_2.thumb.jpg.df4bfc5a5dd39d2ebb52dc22f14e272f.jpg915003688_workbenchpolyed_3.thumb.jpg.a5fe02445d756a48891ba2792d5eb3b0.jpg

With all the rain we've gotten in the last 2 days, I now have a leak somewhere up front and that will be tomorrow's Job #1 - finding and sealing it up. I think I know where there may be a problem, but day light will tell. Rain expected again tomorrow, but if I get a chance to explore, I need to correct this ASAP.

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Mark, Dr. Per, & Jack12477 -

Thanks All for the nice remarks!!! The back half of the bldg. (the shop area) is a lot further along than the front half (sitting/books/etc.) - but, all in good time, I guess! If I don't find this damn leak, I may be having a Titanic moment!!!!🥵 Still raining here and forecast for tomorrow, again. So, this things really messing things up. I hope to get out today and maybe put a tarp over the front porch roof where it joins the front of the shop and see if that doesn't at least divert the water leaking in until I can make permanent repairs. That is, if what I think is causing this leak is the correct answer. Was out a little while ago just to check on things.

Today's work inside would be to sand and re-poly the worksurfaces again. Three good coats ought to do it.

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On 5/19/2020 at 9:53 PM, Hank said:

Did get some work done today/tonight - one small surface board to go and then I'll be finished installing the workbench. I've been polyurethaning as I go, and will sand and then put a final coat on once all the pieces are in place. Also, did a bit more touch up on the wall/trim primer. So, here's where we stand:

WB_1.thumb.jpg.046016ab16e1d501ebc01ceab453fa66.jpgWB_2.thumb.jpg.b81c6afed0e2c83aa277ada30c2c4fce.jpg

After some conversation with another forum modeler re. the flooring and my stated plans, I'm doing a re-think on this - haven't come to a conclusion yet but looking at various options at this point. 

You're doing a really nice job, Hank.  So nice you may have to put in a Murphy bed because I don't see you wanting to leave for a while after it's done. ;)

 

As to the floor, is it well insulated?  What about a vapor barrier?  Is the plywood fir or SYP? 

 

My SO is in flooring and recommends wood planking. 

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7 minutes ago, Julie Mo said:

You're doing a really nice job, Hank.  So nice you may have to put in a Murphy bed because I don't see you wanting to leave for a while after it's done. ;)

 

As to the floor, is it well insulated?  What about a vapor barrier?  Is the plywood fir or SYP? 

 

My SO is in flooring and recommends wood planking. 

Julie,

Thanks for the nice comments! This is a 20+ year old shed that has typical shed features - it has 4 skid beams with joists @ 90°, 16" OC. Then either 1/2" or 3/4" exterior plywood flooring (don't know the variety). That's it - it is what it is!! The shed sits too low to the ground to get under to do anything in the way of repairs. I guess the time to have thought about replacing or insulating would have been prior to any renovations when it was basically empty. Didn't give much thought to it then. The plan (if you want to call it a "plan") was to use the old laminate floor out of the house as a finished shop floor - but, as my recent posts have indicated, that just at this point probably won't work out. I'm leaning towards 16" (or 24") square black/white vinyl tile in the shop (back) and using the salvaged Berber carpeting in the front. I did a CAD layout of the floor using 12" squares and as I noted, it was just way too busy for this size area. For the most part, the existing plywood is fairly flat - only a couple places where nails will have to be hammered down. The floor is not 100% level all around, but "acceptable" - most of the joints are fairly even between the sheets of plywood. The other factor is cost - I'm trying to do this with available materials and not spend a fortune on this building; hence, buying tiles, etc. is not fitting into this plan very well.

What does "SO" mean? Not familiar with that abbreviation.

 

Hank

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2 hours ago, Hank said:

 

What does "SO" mean? Not familiar with that abbreviation.

 

Hank

SO means Special Officer, can be used in many areas both military and civil.

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Roger,

Thanks so much - it's always nice to know I'm making progress - esp. in others' eyes!

 

Dr. Per, Henry - Thanks - I think the Sig. Other is probably correct.

OK, I reversed course with the 1 lamp LED fixture I had purchased yesterday - took most of the morning, but it's assembled and wired with an on/off switch under the cabinet. I also added an extension of the cabinet face to cover the fixture. Here it is prior to painting to match the cabinet:

1475354365_ResizedWBlighting_1.jpg.dec1bcb1a21c24b1de64a25fd706b308.jpg

Thanks to Jaager for the great suggestion. I'm mulling over whether or not to add one on the left side also (under the bottom shelf - I may sleep on it while thinking about the shelf height and whether or not to adjust it before proceeding with a light fixture.

_After lunch I then sanded the entire worksurface and put on another coat of polyurethane. It's been "dry" for the last hour or so (well, not really raining, mainly light mist) so I may try to get the ladder put up and see if I can put some temp. cover over where I think the leak is occurring until it's dry enough to effect a permanent repair. Besides, I didn't want to disturb the wet poly as it sets. 

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One thing I have noticed as I am getting older: I also need more light from the front onto thing that I am working on. The under-cabinet lights (as in the kitchen) are good, but somehow they put shadows from behind onto objects you are working on. Perhaps not so much an issue when you are standing and looking down onto the bench, but irritating when you are, like me, work seated.

 

Not sure, what the ideal solution would be. Perhaps some LED-panels somewhere above the head where the chair is, so that one does not oneself cast a shadow onto the workbench.

 

I am in the process of designing a workshop in our new apartment, so I am watching this space ...

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   When learning drafting we were taught that while natural north light is the easiest on the eyes, for drafting it must be supplemented by artificial light due to its inconsistent nature.  Direct sunlight should never fall on the drawing board because it is usually too intense and produces blind spots or highlights on either the paper or your instruments.  Soft natural light from the upper left is the most effective for you if you are right-handed and vice versa if you are a lefty.

    Overhead fluorescent lighting is well-diffused when it falls on your drafting board and produces few shadows when properly installed.  The light intensity should be somewhere between 60 and 100 footcandles on your drawing surface.  One effective source of light would be one of those adjustable floating arm drafting lamps with two 15-watt straight fluorescent tubes in the reflector head with a base that can be clamped to the edge of your drawing board.  Similar fixtures come with a single incandescent bulb or a combination of a 60 watt incandescent bulb in the center of the fixture with a round fluorescent bulb surrounding it. Some of these fixtures even have illuminated magnifiers attached to them which would be a great advantage for doing very detailed work on our modeling projects especially for those of us with failing eyesight.  If you use the fixture with two straight fluorescent bulbs, having one daylight bulb in combination with a white bulb would give the best results.  

    One caution with fluorescent bulbs is that they produce a stroboscopic effect when shiney tools are used under this light.  This can be annoying, but can be reduced by using a light with a higher wattage or by using a combination of fluorescent and incandescent bulbs.  I am not familiar with effects that the newer LED bulbs would have, but as long as confusing shadows are eliminated and the light intensity is sufficient you should be happy with the results.

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Fluorescent tubes become slowly obsolete and are replaced by LEDs. The jury is still out as to their relative environmental impact and resources requirement, but one thing is for sure, they only need a fraction of the operating energy.

 

The stroboscopic effect is only relevant in conjunction with rotating machinery or (old-time) computer screens that have a refreshment cycle near the 50Hz/60Hz or multiples thereof.

 

As with all lamps, they have to be designed to diffuse the light in order to avoid too stark shadows.

 

I am currently using an 'architects' lamp for a single bulb, but replaced the bulb with a high-power (100W equivalent) LED-globe. The fluorescent tube in the illuminate magnifier stays until it burns out and will then be replaced by LEDs. These days you can get LEDs with virtually any socket that is used for traditional incandescent bulbs, halogen bulbs, or fluorescent tubes.

 

The architects lamp is good for draughting and working on flat pieces, but still does not illuminate surfaces very well that are turned towards you and it is not always possible to orient parts you are working on with the respective surface up. So I am looking for a light source that comes from my back, but without throwing my shadow onto the table.

 

I have put my writing desk perpendicular in front of the window, so that it is to my left. That's a good arrangement for hand-writing and -draughting (both of which I rarely do anymore), but when manipulating parts, we are typically working with both hands. So this needs to be considered as well.

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This sort of lamp allows for light to be adjusted.932128053_clamponlamp.jpg.1951d94f1d51c28f19fb122ded682543.jpgthat clamp along my work bench.

LED bulbs reduce the weight and heat.  I found a deal somewhere for a pack on edge clamps that are more substantial and allow me to pull up and move the actual lamp PRN.

I have one that I removed the final lamp bonnet and use cable ties to hold a crevice tool and flex hose attached to a portable vacuum to suck up saw dust with small machines with no vac attachment.  it gets the inlet close to the action and keeps it there.

 

1640414928_walllamp.jpg.c197fa48770fec21b31dfff482edbe75.jpgI have one - not this brand - but a back wall clamp.   It can seem like a scene from a wildlife documentary showing a pack of hyenas at a fresh kill to get my head into the action, if they are positioned too close.

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Thanks Wefalk, Dave, & Jaager for the lighting suggestions, etc.! When I had everything going down east prior to retirement, I had an assortment of clamp-on, adjustable lamps, both circular, u-tube, and linear flourescents and incandescent bulbed lamps. All those are in the loft, piled up on each other - they will be resurrected and brought out of mothballs for Ship-check and evaluation :Whew:!

It was actually a sunny day and I was able to get the ladder up and put caulking & new flashing on where I think the leak was located. We did get an evening shower and more is on the way, but so far not enough to count. We'll see if my repairs worked or we go to Plan J :default_wallbash:. I also picked up some nice 3" wide x 1/4" thk poplar at Lowe's and have begun work on a 4'x4' shelf box for all the bottled & cans of model paints, etc. Nice for once to have everything in one place!

No pix tonight, but hopefully in a day or so. We'll see what the weekend brings in the way of further progress....

 

Hank

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1 minute ago, Hank said:

3" wide x 1/4" thk poplar

Ready made framing stock for  a 1st rate @ 1:60  ( 15" in scale ).  Depending on the piece, it may want planking over.  It is better Basswood than Basswood, except for the color ...  often good to ugly on the same piece.   A shame about it as display wood, because the bf price for even 10x4 and 12x4 is a lot less than the other domestic species that suitable.  I wonder what a cherry or walnut dye in it would look like?   

 

Hank,

Worse comes to worst, you could always fix your leak using the liquid rubber stuff that the goof on cable keeps hawking.  He seems to think  that you could coat your shed with it,  turn it upside down and paddle it down the PeeDee.

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Jaager,

You know, you're right about the poplar being both pretty & ugly on the same piece of wood. However, for it's intended use, I don't care at this point - a lot more cost effective than the same size red oak (despite the looks!). I'll have to see what a walnut stain does on it - I've got that on hand. I may just put conditioner and a coat of poly and let it go at that!

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7 hours ago, Nirvana said:

Hank,

Aren't you looking forward to start creating some dust in that beautiful area?

 

Dr. Per - Well, YES!!! I'm actually making this paint shelf box IN the workshop, so there is a bit of dust being created, however not model dust at this point!🙄

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Does anyone make a LED replacement lamp for the circular fluorecent bulbs in the lamps with the center magniifer lens? I live by my magnifier lamp, it is much needed now that I am older.

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