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KrisWood

Oseberg Ship by KrisWood - 1:25 - Wood

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9 minutes ago, KrisWood said:

At this point I've decided to call it a learning experience and start over.

Been there done that! welcome to the club Kris.

 

Michael

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5 hours ago, KrisWood said:

At this point I've decided to call it a learning experience and start over.

You're not alone! All part of the wonderful world of ship modelling.:dancetl6:

 

Steven

Edited by Louie da fly

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I'm in the process of cutting out my keel, stem, and stern parts again, and doing it by hand with a coping saw / chisels takes FOREVER and I can't get a straight line for the life od me. I tried using a rotary tool but that thing has a mind of its own and the cutting discs only like to go in a straight line.

 

What tools do you use for cutting out parts? Do you have any links handy for how to cut out parts that are not videos? (I learn best by reading)

Edited by KrisWood

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2 hours ago, KrisWood said:

doing it by hand with a scroll saw /

Hello Kris perhaps a library book on fretwork what type of scroll saw are you using? Pictures please.

 

michael

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Try this.... put a strong light shining down on your penciled lines on the board.  Now for the tricky part.  Use the coping saw (rotate the work piece if you have to) such that the shadow of the blade is inline with your pencil mark.  I've done that more than once and also use the shadow method on my scroll saw.

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How do you know if your coping saw is straight up and down / cutting at the right angle? I don't really have a good strong light other than my phone's flash, and that's hard to hold steady while cutting. I've been working on the front porch so I don't get sawdust all over the house. This also means I don't have a stable work surface. :(

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Ok, the light will be a problem.  What you're looking for when using the shadow is for the shadow and blade to be a straight line.  If the blade is off, it the shadow will be off to one side or the other of the line.  Actually hard to explain and my drawing skills stink.  

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I did some more work on the keel parts last night and figured out this is more a problem of skill with the tools I have than a problem with the tools I have available. When I first cut out the pieces yesterday with the coping saw (and chisels when I got frustrated with how slow the coping saw was at cutting out the long part of the keel) I ended up with a ragged, lumpy chunk of wood.

 

A couple hours of careful work with an x-acto knife, a plane, a sanding block, and a file cleaned them right up. While doing so I realized several mistakes I'd made on my last attempt, the foremost being, how do you tell if both sides of the keel are the same? This morning I realized all I need is a right angle to compare it against. I think I'll be ok.

 

I'm still going to try to get a scroll saw though. ;)

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Hang in there, Kris. You're actually making progress and finding out what works and what doesn't.

 

Even if it may be a little frustrating for the time being it will stand you in good stead in the future. We've all been there and you'll find that as you gain more experience you'll cast aside what doesn't work and spend more of you time doing what does. I still make a hash of cutting out and have to cut everything rather too big and then trim down with knife and sandpaper (or more often a file in my case - I just feel more comfortable with a fine file than with sandpaper).

 

Steven

Edited by Louie da fly

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Minor updates and a question.

 

I'm still in the process of remaking the keel, stem, and stern parts. It's a slow going process with the tools I have available. I've decided to make all the scarfs before gluing and before shaping the cross sections of the parts this time, so that if any specific part gets ruined I only have to remake that part instead of all of them.

 

Meanwhile I've decided to get a scroll saw or equivalent. Currently I'm leaning toward the Rockwell Bladerunner X2 because it also includes a fence to function as a mini table saw. I know it's not the best tool for the job, but it's inexpensive and versatile and even if it's terrible it can't be any worse than my skill level with the coping saw.

 

Has anyone used this saw? Is it worth getting? What blades would you use for cutting basswood? Most reviews say to use Bosch jigsaw blades, but I don't know which ones to get. I already have some laying around so I'm hoping those will work, but at least they're not expensive if I need to get more.

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https://www.amazon.com/Rockwell-BladeRunner-Portable-Tabletop-Accessories/dp/B00L47FZ8A

 

It's basically an upside down jigsaw mounted on a small table. I like that it does multiple types of cutting without needing to buy multiple tools I can't afford. I also like that it's portable since I work on my front porch. I worry a little that it may not be up to accurately cutting out the curvy parts, but it can't do any worse than I'm doing by hand. The only things I'll need are the right T-shank jigsaw blades.

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I have no experience with this particular machine ,but as an Engineer my experience with tools is that the cheap 'all-round' tools are usually they are not good at any of the tasks they are advertised to do.  However, for the hobbyist level of working this machine might do the trick, as long as you let the saw do the work: never push your wood through the thing, just guide it to where it needs to cut.

Edited by Landrotten Highlander

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I took a break from painstakingly copying lines onto my keel/stem/stern parts to work on drawing bulkhead templates for planking the first 9 strakes (10-12 go on after the frames are in place). Does anyone have tips for building a jig for planking a lapstrake ship? I've never built one before and am at a bit of a loss as to how it's done. Ideally I'd like to be able to re-use the parts that keep the keel in place when I switch from bulkheads to frames. Thanks!

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Ok I've got a problem. I've drawn all my planking bulkheads and they need to be approximately 9"x7". As I've said earlier in this thread, I'm having a hard time finding sheets of wood wider than 4" locally, which would mean the bow and stern would need to hang over the ends of the work surface if I want to do the planking upside down as shown on this site:

 

https://www.arbeitskreis-historischer-schiffbau.de/mitglieder/modelle/oseberg/

 

Does anyone have any suggestions of how to either build upright, or to work with smaller wooden bulkheads or other materials for larger ones upside down?

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I may have found a solution. The hardware store may not have wood suitable for modeling, but it does have sheets of 1/4" x 2'x2' MDF that might work for the planking bulkheads. I'm going to give it a try. 🙂

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I'm not sure where you are but usually big box (Lowes, Home Depot) carry sheets of ply down to 1/8" and sometimes 1/16" in 4X8, 4X4 and sometimes 4X2.   It can also be purchased on line like that.   I've used this place which also sells "Lite" ply http://www.nationalbalsa.com/birch_plywood_s/58.htm

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Model aircraft plywood available at hobby shops and online and cheaper craft plywood widely available at home improvement and craft stores is available in larger dimensioned sheets with fractional thicknesses of 1/4,  1/8, 1/16,1/32, and 1/64in.

 

Roger

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Does plywood work better than MDF? I was afraid the ply would be harder to cut because of the crossed grains. I was also thinking I'd need to stick pins in the bulkheads to hold the planks in place and thought the pins would split the layers in the ply.

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Kris,

You'll find that plywood is a lot easier to work with than MDF and not as toxic.  When cutting and sanding the plywood, just make sure you wear a dust mask as with any wood.  

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