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Cutter before 1780 // Old Rig - 4 yards // Truss Pendants?

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At the moment I am puzzling over the Truss pendants. Which yards were equipped with one for a cutter with this "older" rig?

 

On the rare contemporary models and drawings I almost never see ANY rack. I am quite sure the Cross Jack Yard should had one but what about the Spread and Topsail Yard?

 

I would guess that at least the Spread Yard should have Truss pendants... any insight would be helpful and very much appreciated. 

 

Gallant Yard I guess were "flying".cutter_yards.jpg

 

My Cross Jack Yard:

 

bb3b30513756218046c32f90f6bf3982.jpg

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I am not very familiar with the cutter rig.  Is it normal to have a cross jack yard and an additional lower "spread yard" set at the same time?  Seems like an error there.  Wouldn't the lower sail be blanketing the wind from the topsail?

 

Regards,

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8 hours ago, popeye2sea said:

Wouldn't the lower sail be blanketing the wind from the topsail?

The topsail is deeply roached, so the lower sail does not actually block much of it. The spread yard merely serves as a place for tacking the topsail's corners.

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It all looks very complicated to me Dirk.

 

I've had a look at Steel in relation to cutter rig and I can't see a specific reference to a truss pendent or for that matter parrels.

The narrative in the Alert book says that 'contemporary sources indicate that the Square-sail yard (Crossjack) and T'gallant yard were normally set 'flying'

 

It sort of makes some sense if the Square-sail yard (Crossjack) is rigged from the deck and runs up and down in front of the Spread- yard on a horse.

In that case the Spread - yard may well have had a  truss for it to be kept in place the serve the Topsail. I think it would be reasonable to fit the Topsail yard with a parrel in the usual way.

 

Marquardt, (Eighteenth-century Rigs and rigging) shows drawings of the arrangement for rigging the Square-sail yard which is hauled up over the Spread-yard to sit below the hounds, but I have to admit I haven't really got my head around as yet.

 

Cheers,

 

B.E.

 

 

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For clarity, are cutter yards referred to in terms different than other square rig spars? To me a crossjack or crojack yard has always meant exclusively the course yard on a full rigged ship’s mizzenmast alone. In other words the course yards on the fore and main are not cro’jacks. Only the Mizen Course is called crojack.

And the other yards are named after their sails, so a Topsail is bent on a Topsail yard, ect. 

Of course some cutters do have that odd Spreader Yard so maybe the inclusion of this spar throws off the nomenclature a bit? 

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It seems to be the case, altho' the Topsail and T'gallant yards are the same as on three masted square riggers.

The spread- yard  which holds the foot of the deeply roached Topsail would be better described as a Crossjack as it performs the same task as the Crossjack on a three master in relation to the  Mizzen Topsail.

The Crossjack yard on a cutter is really equivalent to the Fore yard  but it is a rather strange yard, narrower than the Topsail yard, which it sits below.

 

Cheers,

 

B.E.

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The cutter yard terms are from the original Sherbourne plan though:

IMG_6401 - Kopie.JPG

Yes it is complicated and I still have no clue ...haha. To have the big square sail yard flying is still resisting me at the moment. Same for the spread, especially this yard is hanging deep down from it's block and could swing a lot (sorry for my non perfect english here ;-)).

 

Maybe we get more input here until I have to finally decide.

 

Dirk 

 

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The Top Sail, Spread and Cross Jack Yards on Cutters have had two pair of brasses - ona pair run to bowsprit and other to stern. Was this probably the tirck to hold the Yard in position without a Truss Pendant?

 

Regards

Alex

Edited by Alex M

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Thanks Alex, not every yard had these brasses unfortunately (according to AOTS Alert and contemporary models and drawings) 😞 I now have made a fixed truss for every yard (I had to do to get the rig in Position ...)

 

Dirk

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