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EricWilliamMarshall

Chesapeake Bay Flattie by EricWilliamMarshall - FINISHED - Midwest - Scale 1:32 - SMALL

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The last build was plastic, so this build will tempt the fates by being wood. Following ccoyle’s advice, this isn’t a 1/2 scale model of HMS Victory towing the Vasa, but a small kit described as ‘near fool proof’. I won’t discuss how close to fool I may be, but, as they say, the proof is in the doing.

 

There is a brief section in Chappelle’s American Small Sailing Craft (yes, gentle readers, I’ve bought some books recently!) but I haven’t found much else. A casual perusal of internet searches finds mostly images of Midwest’s kit! :)  

 

If others have information about flatties, please jump in. Same for sage advice, sarcastic insights and flashing of the ‘please flasten your seltbelt’ sign. All are welcome.

 

Here are some photo’s of Midwest’s Chesapeake Bay Flattie Kit’s bits and pieces.

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This was my first build; I hope you enjoy it (I did)! One thing that I would consider is replacing the PE cleats with some wooden ones and get rope to replace the thread. I don't mind the PE ones, but I didn't know about blackening at the time so my flattie has nice flashy brass fittings 🙂.

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Quote

described as ‘near fool proof’

Don't prove me wrong here!

 

I'm not an expert on endemic Chesapeake Bay designs, but I believe that there is some overlap between the terms flattie and sharpie. Googling the latter term will bring up some images of very much flattie-like boats. 

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17 minutes ago, EricWilliamMarshall said:

Thanks VTHokiEE for the advice! (I hope my build will look as nice as yours does!) Silly question: what size rope(s) would you suggest ordering for this kit? 

I'm no expert by any means so please take this with a grain of salt, but I would probably use 0.012" rope (for some reason when I order replacement rope for my Sharpie I ordered 0.012" for running rigging and 0.008" for standing rigging, but now I can't for the life of me remember why I ordered different sizes). I've only purchased rope from Syren (https://www.syrenshipmodelcompany.com/miniature-rope.php) which is thought of pretty highly on this forum (and you can get replacement cleats there if it interests you). His store is closed at the moment while he is on vacation, but should be online Thursday/Friday this week.

 

If you decide to get a little fancy with the sails and include a bolt rope I would consider purchasing a larger size rope as well (you can see my current status on my Sharpie log). I'm certain you'll build a wonderful ship! Thankfully it is a very straight forward build which I thought was perfect to dip my toes in the water.

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11 hours ago, ccoyle said:
Quote

described as ‘near fool proof’

Don't prove me wrong here!

Hahaha! I’ll see what I can do - but no promises!

 

Searching for sharpies does, indeed, present less of the Midwest products and more actual boats. 

 

Thanks VTHokiEE for the rope suggestions! I hadn’t thought how ‘fancy’ the sails may be at this point it depends on what I can pull off. :)

Edited by EricWilliamMarshall
Be foolish!

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I rushed along with CA glue and trusty X-acto knife without too many problems. The instructions are very clear and straightforward. I didn’t find any interesting detail online, so at this point, I think I’ll be building the kit ‘as is’. Which I’m sure will be interesting and challenging enough. Apologies for the ‘missing’ photos; I was phone-less for a bit.

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Mostly clean up and shaping areas I missed first pass. I started shaping the vertical bow piece as well and will attach it shortly. I couldn't untangle the slightly off transom, but it is very slight (and will wear it as the 'newbie badge of hindsight').

 

I got a bit of glue on the deck also. I did some scraping but to no avail; the glue remains. 

The rest are easy to deal with. I find raking (or oblique) lighting is very useful for checking for missed or flawed areas. How do folks minimize CA glue stains/leak over?  As usual, I'm open to comments, suggestions, criticism and great wisdom!

Next step is prepping the mahogany hatch covers. 

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I had a bit of time in ‘ye olde shipyard’ (actually a new location for me). Hatches and the start of the mast, gaff and boom.

 

I had to retry the hatch placement, as they shifted, after my initial placement (as shown in the photo below).For the mast, I puzzled over plans which show slightly different shapes for the mast and other bits (the side view not matching the top-down view). Also my mast didn’t as deep as seems the instructions believed it ought to.

 

I used a block plane to trim the dowels and then 120 grit sandpaper. The dowels had seams! I haven’t seen that before. I trimmed down four faces first, and then eight and then the sandpaper  In hindsight, I should have drilled the required holes at this stage before continuing. That would have guaranteed the proper exit of my holes. Next time! I was very close but it could be better. 

 

I mixed a bit of saw dust with white glue together to fill the gaps in my tramson with some success. Little by little!

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Edited by EricWilliamMarshall

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17 hours ago, EricWilliamMarshall said:

Any suggestions for the metal work to attach the rudder? What thickness of brass and what favorite tools or methods? 

You might want to take a look at these posts for some ideas:

The above log mentions a book which may have more details for rudders on similar style boats.

 

Here is a picture of a hinge one a different flattie build:

You can follow this third one through for yet another idea for a potential hinge:

I'm sorry that I can't help much with what hinge would typically have been used though, but hopefully those links give you an idea.

 

I grabbed a thin sheet of brass stock (I believe it was a 4"x5"x0.01" thick sheet) from Lowes (which according to the website doesn't sell it anymore) for the metalwork on my Sharpie. I have seen some sheets in HobbyLobby though that would probably work as well (as well as many other places online. I then (using a metal ruler as a guide) scour lines of whatever width I need and break the piece off with a pair of pliers (I should caveat this with an "I'm still learning as I go and there may be much better ways to do this" but now you've been warned). Now I cut the strip down to size and bend it to whatever shape I need (and silver solder if necessary). Finally I blacken and CA glue the part in place. Good luck!

Edited by VTHokiEE

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If you're not particularly into metal work, iron work can often be simulated quite nicely by using strips of of black card stock. Bolt heads can be simulated by daubs of white glue applied with a toothpick.

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Having chewed on the info dump from VTHokiEE, I figured I just try. I couldn’t find any brass strips but I did I find thin rod. I hammered it flat and and used small needle nose pliers to bend it. I found the order of bends is important- you can find yourself “painted into a corner” and not be able to continue (at least with my large tools). I also discover that after hammering the brass, the metal needs to be annealed or the bends will break the metal.  For annealing, I used the flames of our gas stove and then a cup of water - that worked well.

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I couldn’t get the gap between the rudder and transom as close as I like, so I’m passing on the brass hinge (this time). I may try ccoyle’s suggestion or just follow the instructions- this model is an ‘idealized’ renderingalready.; i.e. light on details.

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Stained with water soluble stain and coated the masts with the aforementioned  polyurethane. 
 

The cloudiness of the polyurethane isn’t an issue if you aren’t trying to fill the pores of the wood grain. So out of efficiency, and desire for a common look (and laziness), I’m sticking with the polyurethane on this build.

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I scraped away the red from the above tape line. More paint and stain! The middle black stripe bled terribly, so I scraped it with exacto blade back until it looked reasonable. Then I applied water based stain to the hull.

 

And added two more stripes - masked with tape and applied by brush. The bright red took several coats. I had made hatch covers in mahogany and applied polyurethane. But the bass wood hatches looked just as good, so no change there.

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