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1:200 Bismarck - coming soon!


James H

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I also received a very polite e-mail from Cornwall saying that they had forwarded my missing parts list to Amati and that Amati would be sending the missing/damaged parts directly. 

It'll be interesting to see how this works out.

 

For prospective purchasers:  Note that both STUGLO and I have similar problems, so this may be indicative of the early factory run.  If you can hold off, I'd suggest you do so until STUGLO and I see how Amati resolves the problems.  Of course, I suspect that Amati did a batch run of these kits and the inventory of them may stick around for a while.  Hopefully, if all the problems are similar, Amati will do a "recall-like" action and proactively ship parts to the retailers already having inventory.

 

Will keep this forum advised of what happens with my missing parts.

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20 hours ago, stuglo said:

Hi Ted 99

The fittings were in a small box with the rigging cords and copper nails etc.. The Large view is mentioned above the 6 plans.

UPS express saver- but the company here takes advantage as price only quoted after arrives at local customs. (Called customs, as it is the custom to screw us, the private buyers.) 

I guess USA buyers are really fortunate.  The Customs invoice that Cornwall included showed that the kit went to the USA as "reduced size scale model kits & accessories for assembly" with country of origin Italy and full retail price listed.  Evidently, this combination is "duty free" into the USA and a direct ship to the USA is exempt from the UK VAT, so all I paid was the Cornwall pre-VAT price plus the bargain shipping that arrived in only 3 days.

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Thought members might be interested:

 

The largest model of Bismarck that I ever saw was in the late 70's. She was built by an ex-crewman and a local mall in Bramalea, which contained my favourite hobby shop (YAY, "Vivian's Hobbies" !!!) as a model-building teenager, had her on display. I don't know the exact length, and it's a long time ago for recollection, but let's say 20-25 ft. To actually cruise on the water this gentleman sat inside it with his head and shoulders inside the forward superstructure, looking out I suppose the bridge windows.

 

This model was on a tour of sorts and he had a signing book for any ex-crew members. I was surprised by how many signatures it contained.

 

Just did a quick google search for it but nothing found as yet.

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3 hours ago, Ian_Grant said:

Just did a quick google search for it but nothing found as yet.

I recall seeing a video of a battleship that could be driven about a lake.   Might have been that one.  He towed on a special trailer and also lent it out to places for promotional reasons, etc.   Might have been that ship.

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On 10/2/2021 at 12:14 PM, stuglo said:

Jumping way ahead , what glue do you recommend for the plastic to plastic parts? It's been 30 years since I built a plastic kit.

Usually depends on type of plastic.  Almost any of the liquid types work with the most common styrene.  ABS needs a different solvent.  The key is to use one of the bottles of thin clear liquid, not anything that is thickened and in a tube.  Hold the pieces to be fastened together after trial fitting and use a VERY small brush (not the one that comes in the bottle) to apply a very small amount to the joining line and let capillary action pull the "glue" into the crack.  It's really not glue, it's a solvent that softens the plastic part at the joining line and the two parts "weld" together.  Usually best if you are able to keep pressure on the join line until the styrene at the join line re-solidifies when the solvent evaporates.

 

CA glue can be used for plastic to wood or metal.  In looking ahead at the instructions for our kit, there are some PE brass facing sheets to be glued to both plastic and ply.  The instructions say to use CA for these joins, but they have a lot of surface area and I'm going to approach this carefully.  One of the things I'm going to experiment with is using a high-quality contact cement (like Barge) that has been thinned and apply it with a flat brush to the back of the PE brass sheet and to the plastic or ply surface.  I'll try this on some scrap first and report on it in my build log.  I also see that there are some small PE detail parts that are to be attached to PE brass bulkhead sheets.  Instructions seem to use CA glue, but I'm going to investigate soldering these parts.

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23 hours ago, ted99 said:

Usually depends on type of plastic.  Almost any of the liquid types work with the most common styrene.  ABS needs a different solvent.  The key is to use one of the bottles of thin clear liquid, not anything that is thickened and in a tube.  Hold the pieces to be fastened together after trial fitting and use a VERY small brush (not the one that comes in the bottle) to apply a very small amount to the joining line and let capillary action pull the "glue" into the crack.  It's really not glue, it's a solvent that softens the plastic part at the joining line and the two parts "weld" together.  Usually best if you are able to keep pressure on the join line until the styrene at the join line re-solidifies when the solvent evaporates.

 

CA glue can be used for plastic to wood or metal.  In looking ahead at the instructions for our kit, there are some PE brass facing sheets to be glued to both plastic and ply.  The instructions say to use CA for these joins, but they have a lot of surface area and I'm going to approach this carefully.  One of the things I'm going to experiment with is using a high-quality contact cement (like Barge) that has been thinned and apply it with a flat brush to the back of the PE brass sheet and to the plastic or ply surface.  I'll try this on some scrap first and report on it in my build log.  I also see that there are some small PE detail parts that are to be attached to PE brass bulkhead sheets.  Instructions seem to use CA glue, but I'm going to investigate soldering these parts.

Never heard of ABS before. If you mention this I assume you know this is the stuff used in the kit. ? similar to plexiglass, which I "glue" with chloroform?

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22 hours ago, stuglo said:

Never heard of ABS before. If you mention this I assume you know this is the stuff used in the kit. ? similar to plexiglass, which I "glue" with chloroform?

No, so far as I can tell, the Bismarck kit uses the usual kind of plastic.  I mentioned the ABS because some Model RR applications for it and it needs a different solvent.  Used in plumbing fittings, too.

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9 hours ago, ted99 said:

No, so far as I can tell, the Bismarck kit uses the usual kind of plastic.  I mentioned the ABS because some Model RR applications for it and it needs a different solvent.  Used in plumbing fittings, too.


It is also a relatively common FDM 3d printing filament (after PLA it is probably the most commonly seen).

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PE is new to me and I need to do a lot of looking at U-tube "how-to" videos.  I also need to get some tools for PE, as well.  For those interested in this 1:200 kit, I've been studying the PE parts and the Building Manual to decide what tools I will need.  I want to have them in advance.  It looks like the widest bends will be slightly less than an inch.  This suggests that a bending tool as large as the Small Shop Hold&Fold SMS 004 or the Paragraphix Hold and Fold will be overkill.  All indications are that the Tamiya folding pliers at $25 on Amazon will be adequate.  There are a lot of very small parts to receive 90 deg bends (and some 90 deg twisted 90 deg bends).  The blunt end of the Tamiya pliers looks OK for this.  But, the pliers do not allow you to bend with a backing sheet so I suspect that a very sharp 90 deg bend will be out of reach.  I'm going to take a look at the smaller Small Shop bending tool to see if it can accommodate a 1" width.

 

The U-tube videos are promoting a specialized CA glue known as "Flexy 5K PE".  This might be simpler than soldering or contact cement.  Does anyone have any experience with this?

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Hi Ted,

 

I too haven't built a plastic model in over 35 years.  On my Bismarck the best technique with both photo etch and plastic parts if using  medium CA.  I apply it with a pin vise and a dressmakers needle inserted (you can buy 40 of them at any store for under 4 dollars).  

 

Hope this helps !

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